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A journey into the workshop. #102: More consideration of back saving techniques and ideas... Workstation?

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 06-17-2016 03:15 PM 1153 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 101: Recent flare ups have convinced me... Part 102 of A journey into the workshop. series Part 103: An unplanned fathers day gift for my father in law, starting my shop reorganization. »

So I spent a brief period catching up on workshops last night and an idea came to me…

I’ve never seen a table saw workstation / bench with flip top tool stand integrated into it…

So new thought…

Keep the extended rails on the BT, but lose the legs, and build a cabinet.

This cabinet is to house the entire table saw, wide table kit, plus where the current workbench is, replace that with still more cabinet, so that it is double sided with a continuous workspace.

The side with the table saw will house the saw, and router table, plus storage for all my routers, bits, blades, table saw, and routing accessories.
The opposite sde will be laid out with flip top sections, to have on one end where the table saw is, the bench top jointer, the side where the router is, the bench top planer, and in the middle the oscillating sander.

Integrate dust collection for the lower end of the router table and table saw, and provide storage for spare blades, sanding belts and sleeves.

I have access to both MIG and Wire feed welders, and a brother in law that is willing to teach me to weld, so I am SERIOUSLY considering a 1.5” angle iron mobile base / frame for it. I have several fixed, and swivel casters that are ready to go.

That would leave the storage for drills, and drilling accessories. Yay fun!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



6 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#1 posted 06-17-2016 03:30 PM

This sounds very complex. I considered just using the TS extended table for a router, but realized that I would not have good enough access to that area to make it practical. Make sure you will have adequate access to everything, either because of floor space availability, or moving the whole apparatus. Make sure you factor in the connection to your DC system to account for any movement that will be necessary for access.

I have been delinquent in posting my table saw dust collection, outfeed table, and storage combo. It is fixed to the saw table, and the whole deal can be moved together, but I don’t have any need to do so. I’ll try to get it posted in case it might give you some ideas….....

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#2 posted 06-17-2016 03:34 PM

Another thing to consider…..........I find I like to arrange the big power tools to facilitate efficiency on a particular project. I do this in La Conner, because everything is on wheels there, or soon will be. In Anchorage I don’t have that luxury, it is just too crowded with fixed pieces. There are certain setups that seem to work with most projects, depending on what you like to do. Just prodding you to consider work flow in your design….........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5610 posts in 2700 days


#3 posted 06-17-2016 07:10 PM

Yeah, work flow was a consideration that smacked me after I typed up my post… I typically put the jointer, and planer in the middle of the bench to facilitate feed of long stock through the machine. I lose capacity if I put them on the ends. The way I was thinking of designing this, is to have with the blade lowered, and fence removed, one large flat surface more or less, where I can rotate my bench tools into place. I am in SKetchup now working the ideas, and failing… Still working it.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#4 posted 06-18-2016 04:56 PM

There may be one or two tools that would be best served by being on their own mobile cart. Make sure you have your goals clearly in mind. I assume they revolve around space use, enhanced function of individual tools, and logical storage. In other words, don’t make putting everything into one gigantic monolith your goal. It may be that certain tools could be on their own cart, perhaps in a flip arrangement. They could then rolled into an infeed-outfeed arrangement as needed.

The more tools you have in one fixed arrangement, the more vulnerable that arrangement is to the inevitable replacement of failing tools, or new tools with more or better function. And the new tool may not fit into the complex monolith.

When I made my outflow table for my table saw, my goals were to have an outfeed table that also contained dust control. Storage became an additional goal because unused cabinet space was generated under the outfeed table. Combining outfeed and dust control for a contractor’s saw is a common approach, nothing new there. Getting storage out of it as well is not so common. It was just a byproduct.

I solved my router issues by building a mobile cart with the router table on top, with drawers underneath. My table has a dedicated router, but the drawers actually store all my bits, a plunge router, and a palm router, with all their accessories. The normal storage area for the cart was to be alongside my RAS in the position where I had a long workpiece support for the RAS. So I made the router cart the precise height to take over the workpiece support job as well. So the router table serves another function when not in use. The point is, a mobile cart can serve a function when not in use so it is not just taking up storage room. And if you put drawers or shelves in your mobile carts, they also enhance storage.

Need to get those projects posted, just have to finish some accessories for the raised bed….................

Later….............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5610 posts in 2700 days


#5 posted 06-19-2016 01:10 AM

Call me weird but I actually like having my router table as part of the saw table I’m not sure why but it just feels right to me probably because it’s what I’ve always used even when I was a kid my dad had his router table as an extension of the table saw. I’m not wedded to the idea of a giant monolithic workstation. I just know I am unhappy with my current work bench arrangement and the oversized extension wing on my table saw that I never take advantage of. That space can be better used other integrated or with flip top tool benches at the same height 4 the planer and jointer. The oscillating sander is so like it’s not a problem at all. Same goes with the scroll saw. I’m working on a stand for the bench grinder sharpening station.

I have not got much for myself done this weekend since we have had some changes to my father-in-law’s living arrangements. He has moved into a new trailer and he needs an access ramp that my brother-in-law and I are

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#6 posted 06-19-2016 03:39 PM

If the situation works, I think the router in the TS extension is ideal. I just couldn’t make it work for me due to a pillar in the middle of my shop. I made a wood tray for my extension, and at this time I use the extension of the TS to keep things handy. Underneath it is my large cutoffs cart. It was designed to go there. So, it is not dead space, at least. I use the extension for its intended purpose from time to time, but not with any frequency.

I have a number of changes to make in my workshop, but the shop functions quite well at the moment so it is not a priority.

Today I have to finish a couple of details on the raised bed relating to the cover. But then it is finally finished. After that I have a never ending list of things that need doing in the shop, and even in my office. I seem to be getting more energy again after distressing for 6 months, a good sign.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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