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Bass / Guitar Players pedalboard build #7: Pedal Board for bass done. Some mistakes, some success.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 11-08-2015 08:10 AM 985 reads 0 times favorited 4 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: Sticky gooey. Part 7 of Bass / Guitar Players pedalboard build series no next part

Well, I finished up the pedal board, more or less, and here it is in its matte black glory!

Construction is 1/2” reclaimed plywood that was from Hurricane Ike wreckage (Still going through that stuff). It is butt jointed, glued, and screwed. The finish is matte black high temp barbecue paint (I had it, and I didn’t want gloss as this will be on stage so it needed to kind of hide…)

It helps me arrange my cables to where I am not kicking them when I try to activate to deactivate an effect, or use the tuner.

I managed to somwhere between Sketchup, and actually building mess things up. They are…

#1. Length across the top, is 2” too long. #2. Width side to side is ~ 6” too wide. Particularly since I am considering putting the Snark tuner onto a board for guitar.

I can live with the too long across the top thing, although it means I have the slats toward the back spaced WAY differently than I had designed. And the width, that is the problem. Especially since after I started using the big red effects pedal, realized it had a VERY good tuner built in to it.

So long story short, I will be building another one, and getting a proper can of matte black latex mixed up for that one!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



4 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile (online now)

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#1 posted 11-08-2015 04:45 PM

Building one off projects to handle specific pieces of hardware is one of the most difficult things to do, in my experience. And when you are done, it may become obsolete if you change your hardware (inevitable, probably). So putting in some flexibility is important, such as using Velcro, modular parts attached with screws or bolts, and so forth, is advisable. You have thought of some of these things, but as you use it, you will probably think up more.

One of my more recent shop projects is a case in point, and was my nemesis for years. It controls sawdust for my TS, and doubles as an outfeed table and a storage area. It will be documented sometime in the near future by a project or blog entry. (I am retiring as of 12-31-15, so I should be able to catch up on a lot LJ stuff starting next year.) The project was way too difficult, even considering the utility of the beast.

So don’t be too critical of yourself, because I think it goes with the territory. Keep it flexible, and it may have a very long and useful life.

Nice to see you back in here. You contribute in a very unique fashion, and tend to truly blog, not just present isolated projects and happenings…..................

Just got back from vacation, so I am a little disorganized. The next 8 weeks will take a lot of focus on work to wind up a nearly 50 year career, so expect me to be a erratic with my commentary…......

Later…........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5607 posts in 2697 days


#2 posted 11-08-2015 06:55 PM

Yeah, it’s been kind of bad to be away so long. Just being pulled too many differnt directions.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile (online now)

Jim Bertelson

3964 posts in 2630 days


#3 posted 11-09-2015 12:06 AM

.........and the older we get, the less energy we have to handle diverse responsibilities.

It’s why I am retiring at this time. Just don’t have the stress tolerance I used to have, and that is probably a product of less energy.

Stress tolerance is a down hill slope throughout much of life. You can ameliorate the decline, but you can’t eliminate it.

I learned to stop doing any activities other than work and taking care of me and family. I quit volunteering for things, and controlled work as much as possible. But I can no longer work comfortably, and there is no more paring back left to do. So it is time to give it up.

I always said I would retire as a matter of circumstance, in other words, because of events or declining abilities. It’s not a choice, but the best, if not the only, response to my situation. At least we are reasonably prepared for it, because we knew it would happen. I guessed right within a 6 months margin of error.

So even if life treats you with kindness, and nothing serious unexpectedly happens, you will still have to control what you do and adjust to the circumstances of aging. Somewhere in the 50’s is a common place for it to catch up to people unexpectedly, and they flounder around bewildered about what is going on. But it even happens to people in their 40’s, depending upon various circumstances.

Happy to see you’re back, nothing to apologize for….......we all have to regroup and adjust at times…......

Later…..........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5607 posts in 2697 days


#4 posted 11-09-2015 04:38 AM

Well, at my age, being kidless, I honestly can’t find any legitimate excuse to not get everything I need to done… Other than my body keeps reminding me I am not in my 20s any more…

I remember when my parents were my age, and I am just NOT ready to slow down yet.

It’s sad, when you are young, and have time and energy to do all the cool stuff you want to, you don’t have the money. When you are older, and have the money, you have neither time, nor energy to do all the cool stuff either…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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