LumberJocks

Workshop Development #99: Problem found with compressed air plumbing!

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by dbhost posted 133 days ago 958 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 98: Improvising air hose retaining clamps. Part 99 of Workshop Development series Part 100: Might have solved the compressor plumbing problem... »

As you may know if you are following along, I have been putting up a compressed air plumbing system based on rubber air hoses, 2 compressors, a regulator / filter and an overhead air hose reel…

I came across a popped open drain valve on the filter yesterday afternoon (good thing I turned the compressors off!).

Come to find out, the pressure rating of my Central Pnuematic 3/8” inline air filter / water separator / regulator with the 160 PSI gauge, that goes into the warning range at 150 PSI, is actually rated to only 100 PSI!

Ugh… And I thought I read the specs and the manual online before I paid for the dumb thing…

So for now, I throttle back the regulators at the compressors so that we are just a shave under 100 PSI. No biggie really. All of my air tools require 90 PSI or below.

As is typical, my in depth writeup is on my blog page at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com/2014/04/very-little-shop-time-and-problem-found.html

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



10 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3640 posts in 1789 days


#1 posted 133 days ago

I beginning to think that my basic compressor systems are throw away things….......(-: You know, the 6 gallon PC pancake things. They work fine, no problems, and are not expensive, and don’t take up much room. But no way have I put the mental effort and research into my stuff that you have. However, I am only running nail guns and a blower. Nearly duplicate systems at the two shops, but the one back home is much better set up, with all the guns and the blower constantly connected, and the compressor in a sound deadening space in my multipurpose bench. I hope to have a similar system here, but with the little time I get in the shop each vacation, that is a long way off.

Today I hooked up a little portable Grizzly G1163P dust collection system to my table saw. (Everything else I run using the Festool dust extractor). I assembled it today also, easy, except for some strange bolts that mount the motor/fan to the wheeled base. They were non-standard 1/4”-20 bolts, with a flanged head, that took a 10mm socket.

Buttttttttttttttttt….......the heads were too shallow, widened out at the bottom, and wrenches tended to slip off of them. And they were in tight places to reach…...meaning, couldn’t use a ratchet on them easily. I wonder who was the brainiac that selected those for this application. I finally cut down some too long hex head 1/4”- 20 bolts to fit, and was able to get those in. I probably would have been able to use the original bolts with a ratcheting metric box wrench, but I don’t even have the metric version of that in Anchorage. Fortunately, a non-critical issue solved with a hack saw and some available bolts.

The motor is a 1 hp induction motor, will run either 120 or 240, and the amps fits the stated hp. Very solid, heavy construction. A simple device with a cloth bag to connect and disconnect…......adequate for a TS that doesn’t generate fine dust. It worked extremely well, connected direct to the TS with a short connection of 4” hose. Nice machine, actually, and just right for this shop, that must be put away each evening. Just roll it back to the wall. It will actually hang on the wall as well.

Running in the low 50’s here, but with blue sky and sunshine who’s complaining.

Later…...................

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Callum's profile

Callum

3 posts in 156 days


#2 posted 132 days ago

Do you have any photo’s of your setup? I’m doing a similar setup for my larger (3 head, about 15 cfm) compressor in my workshop and I’d love to see what you’ve done.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1856 days


#3 posted 132 days ago

My blog at http:// daves-workshop.blogspot.com has the photos. ..

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Callum's profile

Callum

3 posts in 156 days


#4 posted 132 days ago

Ahh ok, I found them. I just had to click to a different post.
I’m doing something similar in my workshop but my main reason is that I had a humidity issue. Even with the water trap on there it can’t get all the water out (I run a three head 12 – 15cfm compressor) so I’m going old school on it.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1856 days


#5 posted 132 days ago

How much humidity are you dealing with? I am in coastal Texas and frequently get 90% RH days. I do run a separate water / oil separator at the tool when using my spray guns, but for just driving tools like nailers etc… a couple of drops of air tool oil before use, and what little moisture that gets through doesn’t matter in the least.

Honestly, if budget, and space allowed, and with patience I can squeeze it into the budget, but space is the bigger problem, I would LOVE to get my hands on a Maxair C5160V 60 gallon 5HP compressor. 18.5 CFM at 100 PSI sounds like a real winner to me!

I would have to give up, or at least move up my shop library cabinet, and the storage that provides me is pretty vital. I may eventually move it up the wall to give me the headroom I need for a big 60 gallon compressor, but for now, I am going with machines that fit better in my space.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3640 posts in 1789 days


#6 posted 132 days ago

......a single phase 5hp, wonder how many amps and what size wire would be needed…...........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1856 days


#7 posted 132 days ago

Specs show it as 23 amps.

The outlet is already wired for 230 / 115 30 amps using 10 ga wire. I had that done with future growth in mind when I had power pulled to the shop. Same goes for the main tool circuit. I have wire sufficient to carry 100 amps from the main panel to the sub, just need to swap breakers and I am ready to go at 100 amps… That would be the max rating of the sub panel, but within comfortable headroom for the wire involved as well as the main panel.

Yeah, I overbuilt for a reason…

My long term plan was a big compressor once I figured out how to get it in there, a 3 HP SawStop PCS, and a true cyclone. However with as well as my HF rig is working, might not do a cylcone after all… The 2HP HF DC / Thien / Wynn filter combo has been a very pleasant performer thus far. The only place I find myself frustrated even now is the miter saw. The dust hood contains the dust , keeps it out of my breathing air, but I get a LOT of shavings left behind… No dust above the hood though.

I AM concerned about having to physically attach such a large compressor to the floor.I don’t really want to anchor it. Not sure why that is done other than tipover protection, in my shop it would have ti tip through a wall, or cabinets on 3 sides, and the remaining side is a 24” squeeze before you hit the Thien separator… No quake activity to worry about, so except for a tank rupture / launch event, I just don’t see why…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3640 posts in 1789 days


#8 posted 132 days ago

I thought one would have to exceed the 12 gauge wire to power it. I run my own circuits, so I could do such a thing, but a device needing that kind of HP is not in my plans. Probably ever.

You are a lot younger, and are more diverse in your needs. I have wired double ovens before, and other big amperage requirements, but not likely to do that ever again. Nowadays, I just call the electrician, unless it is shop stuff.

Nice day here in La Conner, sun shining, in the mid 50’s. Tomorrow is clean up day, then home to balmy Anchorage…...............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Callum's profile

Callum

3 posts in 156 days


#9 posted 131 days ago

Mine’s similar along the size of that Maxair unit but it’s some Chinese brand. I went with that one because it was one of the few horizontal tanks I could find. So far I’ve had it for eight months and it spends the whole week working (I use pneumatic sanders and such quite a lot) and it hasn’t let me down yet. It is an industrial unit, cost me just a shade under $600 and the build quality is there. It is 230V, not sure about the power output. Even with the trap I’ve never been able to get rid of all the water. I did notice that the air was still coming out kinda warm, so I did a bit of research and according to what I found the hotter the air the more moisture it carries, so I built a copper radiator out of A/C pipe with dropper valves at the low points, then that runs into the water trap. Since then I’ve had no problems, but I do have a slow leak somewhere in that copper pipe system which is frustrating as all hell. Unfortunately when I was doing it I couldn’t get a flaring tool so I had to go with olive joints. I used to work with brakes a fair bit and even back then getting olive joints to seal properly was a pain in the butt. I sealed all the joints up with epoxy putty (which is ugly as sin but works pretty well) but I’m not happy with it so I’ll probably track down a flaring tool and redo it at some point.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3640 posts in 1789 days


#10 posted 131 days ago

$600 huh, Dave is gonna want the brand and where you got it, so you might as well get that stuff figured out…............(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase