LumberJocks

Design work to keep the shop clean, and protect my canoes...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 161 days ago 657 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I don’t mention it here very often, but woodworking isn’t the only hobby I am passionate about. Those that have seen the early photos of my shop may recall the canoe that used to hang from my ceiling. The boat storage has since been relegated to the yard, another boat added, and well… storage is getting to be a problem. I decided to take to Sketchup to solve the design problem, and I think I came up with a winner. Mostly a copy of someone else’s idea, but with some modifications I would think would make the storage rack more stable…

Anyway, the blog entry is up on my Blogger, check it out if you would like to see the pics and more detail…

http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com/2014/02/design-work-to-keep-shop-clean-and.html

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



13 comments so far

View jim65's profile

jim65

347 posts in 537 days


#1 posted 161 days ago

I’d like to see the canoes! good luck with the stand.

-- Jim, Marostica Italy

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1836 days


#2 posted 161 days ago

Will do as soon as I get the stand built, and the canoes up on it… Or better yet, out on the water!

I am honestly no big fan of the Pelican. It has a big bow in the middle of the hull. When dry and empty it actually bows up, however when loaded and in the water, it flattens out…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#3 posted 160 days ago

Well, I have carried canoes on my back way too many miles in my life, fortunately in my younger years. I finally bought a fiberglass canoe, a Corecraft, a little heavy, but very rugged. It lasted many years, and got sold or left somewhere along the way….....in Fairbanks when I moved to Anchorage.

In my younger days I remember putting on a heavy pack, and then flipping up the canoe as well. Essentially all of that was in Minnesota where I grew up near the Quetico-Superior country. Then the trick was to jog across the portage so that the canoe would bounce ever so slightly and give your shoulders some relief from the pressure. The faster you got across the portage, the less your shoulders suffered, especially if you were also carrying a pack.

I have some great memories, but I am not interested in recreating the experience…......because if it wasn’t the rain it was the bears, and even snow in June.

Loved the loons, water so clear you weren’t sure if your paddle was in it our not, bathing in water falls, camaraderie, camp fires, exploration of rarely visited lakes and places…............

Teens and early twenties….......weren’t we all heroes then, invincible and immortal?

............dreaming…............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3638 posts in 1972 days


#4 posted 160 days ago

My brother in Montana, and one of my friends in Illinois, both had similar problems and asked me, as a woodworker (and probably offer to build it for them too) to design something for their Kayaks.

I did, but it was not wood, instead I designed it with plastic pipe since neither wanted to paint/stain it and they wanted it light enough for two people to move (DWV for indoor/outdoor, PVC for indoor)!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1836 days


#5 posted 160 days ago

I have given a DWV rig some thought as well… It has the appeal of lightness as well as extreme ease of assembly…

Jim,

I don’t portage much these days. Just from the truck to the water and back. Last trip I took was a few years ago, we joined a canoe club outing on the Neches river. Had to be watchful for gators…

The dry bags and cooler got brought to the boat after they were in the water, then we mounted up and took off. Nice slow paddle, 4 hours to the next stop, set up camp, and put in a line…

Part of my reason for wanting to build a cedar strip boat is, it simply HAS to be lighter than my Pelican. Not sure if you are familiar with RamXcel construction, but it is a plastic, foam, plastic sandwich construction. The thing is easily 85lbs…

Many of you know the back issues I have, caused by a traffic accident, injury and subsequent weight gain. I finally found a doctor willing to work with me on the issues and I have been making progress. I am down 8 lbs in the last month. Not a lot, but certainly beats going the other way! We have spent plenty of quality time in the gym, I am hopeful that this program will get me back into reasonable shape. Considering my grandfather was able to strap on one of those old wooden framed trapper packs and head out to the mountains for weeks at a time up into his 80s, I know it’s not an issue of age, but rather physical condition…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#6 posted 160 days ago

I think your Pelican is similar to the Corecraft in some ways, but it was basically 100% fiberglass. Weight about the same as your Pelican. Traditionally, the lightest canoes were the aluminum Grumman Quetico, coming in at about 67# as I recall for a 17 foot version. They were made of lighter gauge aluminum, so you had to treat them more like a wood and canvas canoe. Wood and canvas, unfortunately, were the heaviest, but handled the best in the water.

I can still paddle just fine, but I am not going to flip an canoe onto my back ever again even if I could, and I probably can. But everything is more brittle, and the reflexes are probably slower. Unless I was like your grandfather, who probably did his thing frequently, I would be setting myself up for an injury.

Part of aging gracefully, is constantly setting new limits on what is acceptable physically, considering one’s current physical capabilities…..........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1836 days


#7 posted 160 days ago

Actually Old Town, and Mad river make Kevlar resin canoes that weigh in on the high 40s… But they are expensive…

Paddling.net I believe had a plan for a DIY collapsible canoe cart. However there are plenty out there that are aluminum and should take all that pressure off your shoulders…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#8 posted 156 days ago

If I lived in Northern Minnesota, my brother still lives in Ely, Minnesota part of the year, I might think about some canoeing. In Alaska, lake canoeing is not the same. River canoeing on quiet rivers is pretty easy, and I have done that. But it is a different deal here. And there are greater risks for a number of reasons.

Alas, my portaging days are gone. But I relive them in my memories. It is amazing some of the detail that is still there in the depths of my brain. So, not looking for a new canoe, more interested in a new power tool….......(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3638 posts in 1972 days


#9 posted 156 days ago

Jim, I have been to Ely many many years ago when they still had hitching posts downtown!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#10 posted 156 days ago

I suspect the first time I went to Ely….....to go canoeing, was about 1955. If I saw hitching posts, I wouldn’t have thought they were remarkable…..........or maybe I would have…........(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1836 days


#11 posted 156 days ago

Well like I said, my longest portage in 20 years has been from the truck, to the put in, maybe 100 yards, and again, back from the take out, to the next truck. There is a REAL good reason I use outfitters…

My biggest usage for my canoe for the last I’d have to say 15 years or so, is slow water river / lake boating, usually hidden in a camo blind of some sort, waiting for the ducks to come in, or floating slowly waiting for the bass to take the bait… I’m not willing or able to afford a power boat, nor do I want one. Too noisy. Although a wooden Jon boat with an electric trolling motor has some appeal to me… I have been giving a LOT of thought to building a 12 to 16 foot jon boat with a 4 foot beam. I don’t need a lot of boat, just enough to get myself and a friend to where the fish are… I could buy an aluminum boat pretty cheap, but they are loud on the water, I don’t like that.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#12 posted 156 days ago

I have own an inflatable kayak, which was very useful, a canoe, and an Avon raft.

My Dad and I fished from a 14 foot aluminum boat with a 10 hp motor. We did need the motor to get to the fishing areas. That boat and motor were low maintenance, and the motor was an Evinrude with a low profile, meant for fishing. Great combo…........

Don’t own a boat of any sort anymore…...

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1836 days


#13 posted 156 days ago

I was looking at a 10HP Evenrude recently for the project. Yeah 10HP, I want a quiet motor though. The big boys make a bunch of noise and scare fish off. The last I knew, the Evenrde 2 stroke 10HP was one of the quiet engines out there…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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