LumberJocks

Workshop Development #81: Big object 3D Tetris... And finding some things I need to redo...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 01-27-2014 03:20 PM 558 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 80: Walls done. Moving tools back into place! Part 81 of Workshop Development series Part 82: More cleanup, more drywall work. Fixing some mistakes, and discovering a HUGE mistake. »

Okay I am pretty sure all but the most uh, seasoned among us is familiar with Tetris right? That block stacking video game where you have to slide certain shape objects into certain shape holes by spinning and sliding them etc…

If you are somehow not familiar with Tetris, HERE is the wikipedia entry on it.

I was only able to spend a couple of hours this weekend working on the shop, mostly due to other around the house obligations, but I did spend about 2 or 3 hours playing “Tetris” by moving pretty much all the junk that was on the “other” side of the shop from the one worked. I now have all the dust collection ducting staged in one area waiting to be installed. I also have the lawn & garden stuff, about 90% on, around, and in the lawn and garden rack.

I have managed to get the painting and drywall supplies stashed under my workbench. Not an ideal situation, but it is what it is, and not a lot I can do about it for now. Just live with it. They will leave eventually once the painting is all done anyway.

And I discovered when casually looking at gaps by the drawers, I have a cabinet, the big one, the miter saw cab, that is quite not square. Sad thing is it was square when I glued and screwed it together. Oh well… I had design problems with it anyway… Time to build another one!

I am also finding the french cleat that is holding the library cabinet is under, well a bit too much stress. I am going to add a second cleat to both it and the wall to help support the weight. Either that, or mount the cab itself directly to the wall studs… Yeah, not gonna happen… Cleat #2 here I come! Ugh…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



10 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3666 posts in 1831 days


#1 posted 01-27-2014 04:44 PM

I haven’t tried to use French cleats with real heavy stuff, just the relatively light parts cabinets in La Conner. I do screw them into the studs, but I am sure you do as well. For heavy stuff, I would probably use lag screws in bigger cleats.

Can’t say I was overly productive this weekend, but I did work quite a few hours in the shop yesterday. Had to run the TS switch wire from the motor through the cabinet and out. That required unwiring the switch first, which is slightly complex because of my modified TS switch. I also put in a grommet in the cabinet where it exited. Just plugging along.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5385 posts in 1899 days


#2 posted 01-27-2014 07:00 PM

I know with say like a sagging gate, I can use eye bolts, cable and a turnbuckle to pull it back into square. I am wondering if there is anything I can do to bring that existing miter saw cabinet back into square, and more importantly, figure out why the dang thing racked in the first place..

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3666 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 01-28-2014 05:27 AM

If you have a reasonably thick back piece, then I think it shouldn’t be able to move. I usually build things from my own plans, well, essentially always. I try to visualize the forces they we be subject to, and then build them so they won’t collapse or sag in any direction. But I have a classic example, from early on, when I just used some cheap left over fiber material for shelves for a rack for bolt boxes, and in spite of dadoed plywood for everything else, those flimsy shelves sagged. Still in use, but ugly. Now it would be plywood all the way, with some supporting dividers and there wouldn’t be a problem. I am much more careful, and much neater than I used to be, meaning 25 years ago.

Pull it apart….....you will probably learn a lot.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5385 posts in 1899 days


#4 posted 01-28-2014 05:32 PM

I am actually somewhat stumped on this one. Yeah I think I need to pull it apart, not sure how to do that though. Used Titebond II glue to build it, so I don’t think steam would do much to it… Any suggestions?

As I have continued to dig and clean, not to mention slear off walls from storage no longer used, I have found items that I have been looking for, most notably my Campbell Hausfeld blow guns. I was gifted a CH basic compressor starter set, not the one with the coil hose, but the one with the couplers, tire gauge, tire chuck, and a couple of cheapie blow guns. I misplaced the guns…

In all honesty, I kind of wish they had stayed misplaced so I could go get better ones. The quality of these is just so cheap that I want to replace them, and may still, keeping the CH pieces for spare duty or donating. I really do dislike these and wouldn’t have purchased them on my own as I am familiar with CH stuff and for the most part find Harbor Freight pieces to be of superior quality…

It is now freezing here, with sleet / freezing rain. Being coastal Texas there is no road salt etc… available, so there is a thick coating of ice buidling up on everything. We are off at home today because of that. LOML wants me to help her with laundry today. Will try to get shop time, don’t think it is going to happen though.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3666 posts in 1831 days


#5 posted 01-28-2014 06:11 PM

I don’t know exactly what you are looking at, but even unloading it and looking at all sides might give you a clue. If it was a glued piece, those joints should not have moved, unless there was a total failure of a joint some place.

If the wood thickness was inadequate, then it could obviously warp and bend and then multiple pieces would have to do the same thing. If it was just under engineered, meaning, the cabinet received more stress than you planned for, then bending and warping could occur. You could clamp it straight and then add additional wood where needed.

It’s a little like buying something relatively cheap, knowing that you would immediately revamp it. I bought a rolling charger-starter like that, and immediately replaced the cables, clamps, power cord and handle. Ended up with a very robust item that has lasted about 20 years. Did the same thing with a scroll stand that came with the saw. I didn’t need the stand for the scroll saw, so I beefed it up and now my drill press uses it.

But I think the first thing to do is unload it, turn it backwards and upside down and figure out what happened. If you used glue and metal fasteners, then the joints are probably fine.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5385 posts in 1899 days


#6 posted 01-29-2014 03:31 AM

Jim, from the looks of things, it is looking like the glue failed. I popped a couple of the screws out, and tugged a corner and sure enough I was able to easily separate at the joint..

I am not exactly thrilled with the way this thing came together anyway, so odds are I am going to at least redo some parts of it that made me less than thrilled, not to mention toss out the bottle of Titebond II I have. Apparently there is a problem with this batch…

I am now completely tired of working on the shop for this week. Probably won’t mess with it until Monday at the soonest. I have to really push to get the truck done, and I am not really sure where what remains in the shop is going to live. I REALLY need to figure out some nook and cranny type storage here soon!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3666 posts in 1831 days


#7 posted 01-29-2014 06:08 AM

Gad Zooks, a glue failure is the last thing I would have imagined. I put things together with the yellow Elmer’s stuff for years, with no failures. Now, after reading the article in FWW a couple of years ago, where they glued transparent plastic to wood…...I do things differently. Inadequate glue was the biggest problem. They said apply glue to both surfaces, and brush it over them evenly….....which I have done now for…....a couple of years I think. But I remember just throwing some glue in joints, and they always seemed to hold.

Hmmmm….....some environmental change affecting the glue? That is weird.

Well, more detail might be useful, so others don’t duplicate your problem. From what I have read, even clamping isn’t that important. So a screwed joint should be overkill. I glue and nail a lot of stuff, have for many decades, and have seen no failures. The glue is suspect.

Well, give it all some time, and do some thinking on the storage. And do some thinking on throwing things away….......

Well, off to bed….....

Later…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Jim Bertelson

3666 posts in 1831 days


#8 posted 01-29-2014 06:13 AM

.......and by the way, I use Titebond III here in Anchorage, but have used some Titebond II in La Conner, just to see how it works. I don’t have any tales to tell yet, but the Titebond III projects are extremely strong, and show no signs of problems. I will check on the Titebond II stuff in La Conner, a wetter climate perhaps than Anchorage, but not as humid as your climate.

.......zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz….....

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5385 posts in 1899 days


#9 posted 02-03-2014 06:04 PM

I have mentioned this elsewhere, but I don’t think the problem is necessarily the glue itself, but rather I think the plywood more or less drank up the glue and starved the joint. I will be pulling this apart soon, exactly when I can’t say, but soon… Once it is solid, and of course square, I will finish building the drawers, and finally, get the table saw & router accessories out of the tote they are in, and into the cabinet.

LOML doesn’t seem to understand what I am doing in here, but she does like the fact that the house projects are getting done. I guess since she isn’t seeing many wood projects completed she can’t grasp why I spend so much time out there. She forgets time to build skills… I guess I should throw the knitting thing she is doing as an example…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3666 posts in 1831 days


#10 posted 02-05-2014 04:18 PM

My wife doesn’t complain about my shop time or expenses, because she is into quilting, and she has much more money into her machines than I do in mine….........(-:

I agree that the more likely problem is insufficient glue. The issue is to get adequate glue there, and then put the joint together before it disappears. I like the nail gun because it is much easier to get the joint together quickly than with screws. I still use a screws in many places, with or without glue, just less often than I used to.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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