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Workshop Development #77: Very busy Saturday... Got the paint on!

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 179 days ago 643 reads 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 76: Getting ready for the weekend... Part 77 of Workshop Development series Part 78: Not much done, and it felt so good to not do it! What to do with surplus tools? »

Well it’s been an eventful day. First off, I installed the 9 bulb chandelier that LOML wanted for Christmas in the dining room. I have filled it with 28 watt screw in Halogen screw in bulbs. Even with the muted globes this thing puts out enough light with these bulbs to make me feel like a 747 is landing on my head!

Next we took my Father in Law out to Thai food for lunch. He had never experienced Thai and liked it! Woo Hoo!

We ran a couple of errands and came back home. I finished what I was going to do with sanding, and painted the wall in the garage / shop. THe first coat when it was wet looked bad. But now with a couple of hours of dry time on it, the bleed through seems to be stopped…

The last big thing I was planning for today was installation of the cold air intake tube on the truck. The stock intake tube narrows down VERY far to around 2” diameter, choking the engine, and making it work like crazy to make power…

The install required some massaging on the edges with my sander though. The plastic molding wasn’t exactly neatly trimmed. But installed the throttle without a doubt responds a bunch quicker. Hopefully this will translate to better mileage if I keep my foot out of it…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



13 comments so far

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3256 posts in 1095 days


#1 posted 178 days ago

I hate hanging sheet rock.

DB here is the picture of that tree I mentioned, I said straight lined but to me that’s pretty straight for a Mesquite :)

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1747 days


#2 posted 178 days ago

We have an old chandelier that has a pile of glass crystals, and a bunch of little bulbs, just old incandescent, but it too throws out a lot of light.

That shop is beginning to look like something. Pretty soon, when it is done, you will get a reclining lawn chair, pop the top on a cold one, and sit in the middle of it and just smile for a couple of hours….......(-:

Well, got to buy a little wood, and get going on the out feed table…............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1815 days


#3 posted 177 days ago

Blackie_

Yeah, for a Mesquite that is pretty straight. Nice looking tree too… Do you get a lot of the pods shedding off of that?

Jim,

A cold one sounds like a good plan!

I want to get a second coat of paint on that wall, and get at least the tool cabinets / french cleats installed. I have a bad feeling I won’t have much space between the top of the cabs and the bottom of the door track. I know it will clear, but not by as much as I was thinking…

Once the cabs are installed, I can move the tool stacker, do a bit more cleanup, and take a break. At that point it will be move tools back where they go, plumb the dust collection and I am done!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1747 days


#4 posted 177 days ago

I want to see the lawn chair and the cold one…...........(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1815 days


#5 posted 176 days ago

No lawn chair. I have shop stools… Sort of regular padded bar stools, but with the Woodcraft logo! Right now heavily encrusted with drywall dust, but that is a different story…

I was not happy once the paint went on with some very visible low spots in the mud work I did. Most noticeable and annoying were around the sub panel, and the main seam where things just weren’t lining up. I took the Tammy Faye Bakker method of makeup application and slapped on liberal amounts of mud to level up the area around the panel, and then skim coated the seam to get rid of the bubbles and depression.

While I was at it, I got kind of carried away, and installed the french cleats for the tool cabinets. I moved the cabs closer together due to a measurement problem. Simply put, I was willing to sacrifice the bridge between the cabinets to move the tool stacker to this wall, closer to where I will actually use it…

I will probably paint the front half of the wall tonight, get that second coat on there, but the area around that sub panel has to wait until it fully dries and I can get it sanded smooth. THEN I can paint, and repaint it…

I am going to grab a second gallon of this cheapie white paint for the weekend. My plan at this point is to…

Tonight. Paint front half of wall, up to the RO tank.

Tomorrow or thurs… Install outlet covers on fully painted wall segment. Move tool cabinets in place and reload them.

Friday. Pick up second gallon of cheap paint. Sand mud around sub panel, smooth it out completely. Paint remainder of new wall, paint the niche common walls behind the tool box as they look NASTY.

Saturday. Second coat of paint on old wall segment, and possibly around where the skimming I did last night was…

Sunday. Take the day off…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1747 days


#6 posted 176 days ago

It is nice to see your projects finally coming to completion. Your shop, and to some extent your house, has been a war zone or a work farm, depending how you look at it.

In La Conner, I didn’t have to do any major house jobs, to speak of. Just a little deck repair and put in some flashing to better direct rain water and to keep it going from one deck to the next. We have a couple of high balconies for two of the bedrooms, and then have elevated wooden walkway leading to another deck, down below.

Most of my work in La Conner has been setting up the shop, starting with absolutely nothing. Finally I have enough of a shop that I can build the rest of the shop!...............and a few doodads for the living areas. I don’t know about you, but if I don’t have a shop, I feel like I am living in a hotel, or just visiting someplace. I have to buy or build a stool/chair for that shop, just have to find out what is available around there.

Well, yesterday was mostly making a living, today I will have a little shop time in the morning. Tomorrow and Thursday I should have a little shop time in the afternoons. I am on call this weekend, but I actually have been getting some time in the shop on the call weekends. We will see what happens.

Later…........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1815 days


#7 posted 176 days ago

Well I see a little bit of skim coating needing to be done on that seam to the right of the panel. I am not liking how unlevel it looks… But I can fix that quickly…

I have a LONG way to go on the house, but it is getting there. The shop getting done means I can start on the flooring, Flooring getting done means the living room, dining room, front hallway and laundry room are done.

I have so much left to do after that, I would just give up and cry if I though to tackle it all at once. But I am handling this one bit sized piece at a time. The shop build supports the cabinet rebuild for the kitchen and bath, and of course finalizing the sheathing the ridge beam in wood etc…

So while yes, the shop has taken quite a bit of my attention, there actually is a madness to my method… I would very much like for things to be more like they were in my 20s, where my friends all helped each other knock out projects, then go have a beer. I am at the point now where I am mostly working solo, with rare, but helpful when I get it help from LOML… I mentioned this before, but don’t get me wrong, I am NOT faulting guys for doing the family thing… Just commenting on the eventual track life takes. This particular birthday just past I guess bugged me more than most. I am further down the road than I should be without having kids, and this house still isn’t done yet… I just kind of felt like the home repairs I should be doing at this point in my life is fixing what kids break, not what years of being single and having a lousy roomate did…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1815 days


#8 posted 176 days ago

Okay, got the second coat on the wall all the way back to the RO tank, and I pulled the mechanics tools out and painted the back wall and some of the side wall. I am now out of that gallon of junktastic Speedwall semi gloss basic white.

My BIL is supposed to be coming over tomorrow night, and we are going to spend some time with extended family, so it looks like my evenings are taken up until at least Friday, so I guess the plan at this point is…

#1. Let the mud dry bu the sub panel. It should be fine by Friday. If I get a few minutes in the shop prior, reinstall outlet covers on areas where paint is finished. #2. Sand down the high spots, smooth it out on Friday. Wipe the wall down, then paint the second coat. Okay first over the mud, but that covers MUCH easier than actual drywall apparently… #3. Finish the paint on the side wall. Then apply second coat to back wall. Clean painting supplies. #4. Move tool / parts cabs onto the french cleats.

Wait until Saturday then… #1. Move Mechanics toolbox and tools back into position. #2. Move dust collector, dust collector, and separator back into position. #3. Move unattached drywall sheet out of the way temporarily. #4. Move lathe, band saw, and drill press back into position. Arrange any accessories related close to device that uses them except drill press… Those accessories / storage is another project. they are temporarily housed in the library cabinet. #5. Move tool stacker system to segment on wall. #6. Finish un-burying table saw, and size a mount board for the scroll saw. Mount scroll saw. And place on Tool Stacker (Door track on current location are what keep the scroll saw off of the tool stacker!).

Take a break, and when I am done there, take another break… This one should be for several weeks. I need time to recover, and I have heavy transmission work to do on the truck… But once I get back…

#1. Re-plumb dust collection system to the tools…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1747 days


#9 posted 175 days ago

I put French cleat up for my parts cabinets….....meaning the plastic things that hold screws, nuts, bolts, etc…....in La Conner. I just used some 3/4” ply for the cleats…....but of course it was a light weight application. I hope to do a similar thing here in Anchorage, but I have no distinct project plans at this time. The cleats make hanging easy, and allow rearrangement and reorganization flexibility.

Hope to get a little time in the shop today, but it is uncertain,

..........have a good one…....

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1747 days


#10 posted 175 days ago

.......and re your earlier post…......getting older just slips on by you, and finally you are ancient like me. It is amazing to think how many years I have lived here an how fast they went by. But as I tell my wife, we were having too much fun to think about it….....and we are still having fun…................

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5377 posts in 1815 days


#11 posted 175 days ago

The tool cabs I have are from I think a Wood magazine plan, more or less anyway. I have my parts bins in one of them. Those 39 drawer units. Sadly one of them presently is 38 drawer. No clue where I put that last one! But I digress. The cleat is 3/4” ply, and is more than sturdy enough to hold the load. I am still chewing on how to store my lathe tools until I get the cabinet built… Probably keep using the shelf I have been on the stand. I hate stooping to pick up a different chisel…

It was actually nice when I went into the shop this morning to see if the drying paint gave me the coverage I wanted. The whole thing just stank of drying latex paint… Sort of like the new car smell I guess. Without a doubt gave me the feeling of accomplishment. They should sell drying latex paint air fresheners!

I actually did just sit on the stool watching the paint dry some last night. Not cold beer time yet, but I just wanted to appreciate the work I have been putting in…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1747 days


#12 posted 175 days ago

I find the plastic parts cabs work pretty good, especially the new vinyl stuff that doesn’t break, rather than the acrylic. I have some vinyl bins that are over 30 years old that I store large bolts and associated hardware, as well as nails. Those bins might as well be new. The old acrylic stuff, again in the 30 year age range, is slowly getting broken and cracked. With the new parts cabinets they don’t include dividers, you actually have to buy them on line. So in La Conner, I actually mass produced some dividers from hardboard and that worked well.

The La Conner shop I am keeping neat and orderly, and keeping up the plaster and paint as I go along. I need to run another circuit at some distance from the panel. I will probably use conduit for appearance. Here in Anchorage, the shop is a calamity in terms of appearance. I may start working my way through it, painting and upgrading as needed. I actually need to make some mobile cabinets for the smaller power tools, just like I am doing in La Conner.

This morning prior to work I finally got my outfeed interface to the TS adjusted to the correct height, and should be able to build the outfeed table rapidly. It is designed to attach to the TS and contains the dust control box for the hanging motor. Bunch of tricky work, but is nearly done. The dust control is the most important part, but it will be nice to have a real outfeed table as well. I just used one of my folding project tables in the past, but they required adjusting frequently. It appears I will be able to hang my super sled off of the side of the saw + outfeed table. The panel sled will fit on the wall where the band saw will go. It will be nice to have those permanently housed as well.

Later…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3256 posts in 1095 days


#13 posted 174 days ago

DB tons of pods, I have a hard time keeping my dog from eating them.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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