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Workshop Development #71: The drywall is up!

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 207 days ago 881 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 70: Cleaning heavily under way. Finding evidence of shop visitors that need to be removed... Part 71 of Workshop Development series Part 72: Building tools in the shop to build the shop... »

Sorry the photos aren’t the best. The lends was dirty due to drywall dust… I have since cleaned it…

But here it is in all its unfinished glory, hung drywall!

Yeah I hate doing this part…

Due to some framing oddities in my shop, some of the joints ended up being over air. and I had to trim some plywood pieces to allow the panels to pull together correctly. The gaps around the sub panel have been patched and all is now in the first coat of mud to close up the gaps. Next comes sand it back smoothe, and tape it, second coat of mud then smoothe it, paint it and mount up my goodies…

I am not sure I can weasel time in the shop tonight, but if so, I am going to try to spend some more time mudding and sanding. Yeah I REALLY want this done…

I am not sure if the Black Cat bait station to delete the shop visitors is a failure, or if the shop visitors have been scared off due to the amount of activity in the environment, but nothing is taking the bait yet…

I did find where they were getting in though, at the bottom of the doors, there is a gap where the framing isn’t super square, that they gnawed through the door gasket and have given themselves a way to get in… I will fix / replace the gasket, but I am not sure how permanent of a fix that is… We will see…

I still need to clean the junk off the workbench, and table saw, put things back where they belong. Once the walls are done, the cabinets go up, wall stacker gets moved, DC plumbing gets re-run, and then equipment gets moved…

Due to the high space consumption of the items, I am particularly anxious to get the dust collector, dust collector stand, 55 gallon Thien separator, and 8 gallon air compressor stowed back in the corner.

I am giving SERIOUS consideration to getting rid of the 55 gallon separator, and going back to a Thien separator in the inlet ring of my dust collector. I need to be more space efficient, and that 55 gallon drum takes up WAY too much floor space…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



14 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#1 posted 207 days ago

OK, you caught me at a bad moment….......meaning, I will comment tomorrow morning. So glad to see you got it up though, now it is just puzzin around with the tape and mud. And speaking of dust collection, gotta get better for here in La Conner….........

Listening to Elton John, probably not your favorite…....yes/no???

The real problem is that we are listening to Mad Man Across the Water, mixed in with the Diving Board….......over 40 years difference. Just stuff on Sherie’s iPhone….............

.........in the morning…......

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#2 posted 207 days ago

Uh. Not a big Sir Elton fan… don’t hate it, just never got into it…

Got the corner by the door mudded…

Most of the screws are mudded too. Good stuff so far!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#3 posted 206 days ago

I should mention HOW I got the corner mudded. I have had this idea for quite some time. I am not certain if I am doing this right but I am going to try anyway. You see I have never done drywall before other than patching and such. My intent here is to fill any gaps / irregularities between the panels and at the corners FIRST, sand it smoothe, and THEN apply tape / more mud. Well in order to clear the new 5/8” fire code drywall, which is NOT what my builder put in, again how this house passed inspection I will never know, but I had to cut out some material, from the adjoining walls, not a huge amount, but that left an uneven edge, and once the drywall was up and settled, the corners needed to be filled in…

Now just how to do that without driving myself insane?

Caulk tube / gun!

Sadly, it seems nobody sells drywall mud / spackling in caulk tubes. So more DIY was in order…

Step #1. Grab a caulk tube that is almost done for.
Step #2. Remove all the excess caulk, Just pump it into a trash bag and let it cure.
Step #3. Using compressed air / blow gun, carefully insert blow gun into tip of tube, and while making sure the bottom of the tube is where you don’t mind getting messy like a utility sink, blow the plunger part out of the tube.
Step #4. Thoroughly wash your caulk tube, plunger, and if necessary your caulk gun.
Step #5. Cut caulk tube tip bigger to allow for the thicker wall board compound, and fill tube from bottom, Insert plunger and install in gun.
Step #6. Jam wall board compound into the crevices and pump away.
Step #7. With putty knife smooth the compound, recovering excess.

Repeat filling / cleaning out as necessary… I have a LOT more to do over the weekend, but I am making good progress on this wall for sure!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#4 posted 206 days ago

It has been so long since I did anything other than a patch, I don’t even know enough to comment. However, when you are dealing with irregular spaced studs, the only thing I can even think of is to add studs at appropriate positions. I suspect the pros would remove more of the old wall board, and then add studs, etc. But that implies that the whole house isn’t goofy, and that the budget is more substantial. As long as there is decent backing for the wallboard, whatever works and looks good in the end is all that is required.

Your caulking gun trick is interesting, and again, whatever works is the criteria. This project probably comes under the heading of “repairs to wallboard”, and there are a zillion products out there to make the job easy and cheap. Basically, wallboard is not a structural item, nor is it a hazard issue, unless you bought some of the cheap stuff that China sold to Lowes a number of years ago.

My biggest beef in houses is the lack of sound suppression. The difference in sound suppression between an outside wall and a standard inside wall is amazing. We have a master bedroom at home that was built out over the garage (actually my shop), and you go up there and close the door and you don’t hear anything….....well perhaps I exaggerate, but it is really quiet. Its walls adjoining the rest of the house are all old exterior walls. The only issue, is that shop noise does go up, so I can’t be working in the shop while Sherie is asleep. I have the identical situation here in La Conner, master bedroom over the garage/shop. Didn’t you say you added insulation for sound suppression? I think that is correct, and that is a good move.

I got the basics of my second pedestal done yesterday. the pedestals need to have their levelers put on them today, and then the torsion box bench will be totally functional. I think I will do a little work to the tops of the pedestals, because they can be used as work surfaces. Otherwise, they shall remain unpainted until they can dry outside, and that may be possible our next trip to here, in early April. Unless someone knows of a water based product that has the resilience of Watco, I will finish the bench parts like I do all shop construction. I am going to do my best to post the bench this week. It is different enough that others might get some ideas from it. Hopefully, I will beef up the stationary bench to take a woodworking vise this trip as well.

Later…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#5 posted 206 days ago

I added insulation for HVAC purposes. It gets unbearably hot in the shop in the summer without it. The common wall was previously insulated. Noise is there, but somewhat minimal…

My father in law will be staying with us for a few days so this project might have to wait. But then again, he might want to come out to the shop and help out! That would be kind of cool..

I was really hoping to close up the gap at the ceiling and the common wall (the calk gun trick about 3 more full tubes…) and smoothe it out. I also realized one of my upper panels isn’t screwed in fully, I need to finish running the screws in…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#6 posted 206 days ago

I do recall you moaning about the heat in the summer in the shop. My problem is never heat either in La Conner or Anchorage. Going out to a restaurant this evening, the one just a block away. We made reservations over a month ago, and still the earliest we could get was 2030 hrs. They also called us yesterday to make sure we would be there. It is a very popular place on New Years, I guess. Should be fun.

Well Sherie just got up, and is traveling to the nearest Starbucks, about 15 minutes away. Nothing stops her from getting her morning mocha…....actually, let’s face it, it is just chocolate milk with a little coffee flavor. She will drive for 30 minutes one way just to get to a Starbucks. I do not participate in those journeys, I happily make some sludge at home. Here in La Conner I use a French press, and make a very strong cup of coffee, nearly as strong as espresso. At home I have a computerized thing, and I actually do make espresso there.

Now that Sherie is up, I can get out in the shop and finish up the torsion box bench. I have been warming it up for a bit with the electric heater…......

It would be nice if your FIL helps out, would speed up the process I would think, if he knows what he is doing…...

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#7 posted 206 days ago

Actually, his help would likely slow me down. He is 82 and has some mobility issues. My thought process is more one of quality family time and including him on a project… There would be no rushing anything like we do with the brothers in law…

I have some work coming up very soon the BIL that runs an auto body / mechanics shop has offered some help with.

On the truck, prior to taking it to his shop, probably this weekend, I am going to install a set of coil spring pre load spacers to compensate for the weight of the winch, plus I am changing the restrictive stock intake tube off, and installing an aftermarket free flow cold air tube.
Reset custom tune on the truck for the new air tube so it doesn’t run lean.

At the shop (I need access to the lift, transmission jack etc…
Pull transmission and transfer case as a unit.
Inspect inside bell housing. Drain torque converter completely.
Replace whatever seals have decided to fail. Potentially replace the torque converter itself. This seal failed for a reason, most likely the converter became unbalanced and trashed it…
Reassemble transmission / transfer case onto truck, make all connections.
Drop transmission pan, replace filter, thoroughly clean pan, and install drain plug kit. Have the female thread part fully tig welded to the pan.
Fully reassemble with new filter, and pan gasket. Torque to specifications. Fill transmission per Ford procedure and verify.
Service Transfer case (change fluid). Verify
Fluid exchange on brake system per Ford procedure. Verify.
Fluid exchange on power steering per Ford procedure. Verify.
Fluid exchange on both differentials per Ford procedure. Verify.
Change fuel filter per Ford procedure. Verify.
Change serpentine belt and idler pulley. Verify.
Change upper and lower radiator hoses, change heater hoses.
Power flush & fill cooling system. Verify.
Road test truck. Return to clean pad, and verify no leaks.

The good thing is this will likely end up taking multiple trips. I am really mostly needing to get the transmission / transfer case and fuel filter service done. (Fuel filter is a mere 5 minutes more once the truck is on the lift…). The differentials, belts, hoses, diffs, brakes etc… should be left for another day…

I am trying to get the full 100K service done even though I am technically a few K short of that mark… I figure with proper maintenance, I shouldn’t need to replace this truck until it hits at least 200K, which at the rate I am going considering most of the mileage that is on there went on in 6 months of a nasty commute, well I might have to replace the truck after I am dead… Although I have a suspicion that parts availability might be somewhat limited long before then…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#8 posted 206 days ago

I just made a trip to the grocery store in our 2nd car here in La Conner, a 2002 Subaru Outback. Bought it from a friend when she moved out of Alaska 2 years ago. She is now down in Monterrey, where she had lived before. The car looks like it is 2 years old, and the odometer says about 37,000 miles. We bought it very cheap and have had a few unsolicited offers to buy it from us. But, it is excellent cheap transportation, and gets used very little. We mostly use the Sienna. But I do like driving the Outback, it is nimble and simple to operate.

I suspect you will get a lot of years out of that truck, especially if you are no longer using it to commute. I drive a 2002 Odyssey at home, and it only has about 40,000 miles. I will drive it until it becomes unreliable. I am just not into switching out cars frequently any more.

Well back to the shop. Got to get some stuff done before we go off to celebrate New Years….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#9 posted 206 days ago

LOL… Actually if it was up to me, I would replace our 2001 Saturn SL2 with a 2 or 3 year old Outback… However LOML REALLY wants a luxury car. She is thinking a Benz… Part of the reason we are pinching the pennies and getting debt dumped off is I told her we would buy her a Benz once the big debt was gone…

For the cost of say a new loaded Fusion, I can get a Mercedes Benz C320, okay maybe a couple grand more, but not so much to be a problem… Given decent care, that car too should outlast a series of cheap cars…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#10 posted 205 days ago

Well first coat of mud is done. Got to let it set up then I can sand it and start taping. Love making progress.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#11 posted 205 days ago

OK, tell me you don’t love it when you are just putting lipstick on the pig and it all turns out looking gorgeous. The bad part is hanging the board, the fun part is putting on the cosmetics. There’s art involved. You can be OCD and nobody is going to say anything about perfect drywall, because, well, it’s perfect. Smooth, invisible seams, perfect corners. You should have on your artists hat and smock, be smoking weed, and sipping absinthe.

Having some trouble visualizing you in that gig….........but you get the point. It’s all down hill now…..........

Have a good evening…...think I will turn in early….................

.........did you know the hardest thing about setting up a woodworking shop, is that you have to have a woodworking shop to set up a woodworking shop. Today I was about to put together my new (and very cheap) drill press, and I needed to have some bolts to fix it to a board. In Anchorage, I would only have to decide which length, size, type, etc. and reach into the appropriate spot and get it. Here I had to go to town and buy them. But, deciding to get a leg up, I bought a complete selection of bolts and nuts of all sorts in the most common range for this type of thing, 1/4” and 5/16”, the larger being appropriate for the task. At home, I would probably have used 3/8”, but here I know that I will not be needing that size of bolt, or larger, very often. And of course, at home, I have been collecting nuts, bolts, screws, etc. for about 40 years. And of course, I am putting the drill press together so that I can make the holes for the levelers for the torsion box bench pedestals. Gotta put together the shop so that I can build the shop!!!

I mentioned to my wife, that you don’t need a quilting room with all the machines, fabric, and other stuff to set up a quilting room. You just go out and buy the stuff.

We guys really have to suffer with our hobbies, and the gals ought to understand that and sympathize. Of course I am being a little male chauvinistic here, because some guys make quilts, and we have a lot of gal woodworkers.

.......but you get the point…....yawnnnnnnnn….............zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#12 posted 204 days ago

Interesting thinking about art in a wood shop… I was an art major in college, and ended up in a field that has not allowed me much in the way of creativity, this is part of why I got into woodworking in the first place…

I checked on it this morning, the mud was still somewhat wet. Go figure, arctic front blew through last night and our temps dropped. Nothing like you would deal with, but enough to slow down drying time on drywall compound…

I am somewhat doubtful I will have much of a chance to get out to the shop to continue before Saturday, and even then the truck needs help… Ugh.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3622 posts in 1763 days


#13 posted 204 days ago

Well, when it comes to drywall lipstick, you can have any color you want, as long as it is white. I don’t think the choices for transmission fluid and seals colors is much better. May the gods smile upon your transmission, and may they blow hot air in your shop. I suspect the smock, brush, and easel are going to have to wait a bit.

My shop is calling me….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1831 days


#14 posted 203 days ago

Well, got most of the drywall sanding done last night. The gaps are closed well enough. I need to get into the hard to get to corners. I am going to make a simple sanding block to hold 1/8 sheet and knock it down with coarse grit (40) paper, then we wipe the walls down to get the dust off, and I start with taping, and more taping… Need to go to HD to get some tape, more mud, and a taping tray.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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