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Workshop Development #66: Been out for a while, getting back to finishing the shop...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 12-17-2013 04:37 PM 850 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 65: Back to the wall after the LONG wait! Part 66 of Workshop Development series Part 67: Weekend project list. Prepping for Christmas and a happy new year too! »

The shop has been dismantled for far too long. My weekend plan includes shop time. Specifically trimming and mounting the lower drywall segments along the north wall. The east / door wall segment needs to have the blow in insulation, well blown in. Once all buttoned up, and the drywall taped / mudded and at least one if not two coats of paint, the following has to take place.

#1. Clean, clean clean. Get everything staged to install and move.

#2. Install the french cleat system, and tool cabinets. Include installing the “bridge” between the cabs, and the tack on shelves for small jars / sanding media etc..

#3. Move the tool stacker system to the other side of the room. I will place it roughly at the same spot that the table saw ends… This is by design and measurement…

#4. Clean up and dispose of any waste material. Any scrap that I am not going to use within the next year needs to go into the kindling bucket to go to the deer lease…

#5. Re-arrange my large tools.

#6. Complete the miter saw cabinet / drawer assemblies. Get the cabinet 100% functional.

Once everything is back up in place, I move on to the last phase of the project…

#1. Clear out south wall, remove damaged (which is pretty much all) sheet rock.

#2. Install insulation.

#3. Install fresh sheet rock, tape, texture, paint, reinstall lumber rack.

#4. Build rolling clamp / safety equipment rack.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



6 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#1 posted 12-17-2013 04:57 PM

Hey David, glad to see you are organized and checking things off the list. I have been too busy at times, but it has finally slowed down to something more reasonable. I have this coming weekend off, but I am on call for Dec 24, 25, and 26. On the 27th, we go to La Conner, and will actually celebrate New Years there. Can’t remember the last time I even acknowledged that New Years exists, since I was on call every year for New Years for about a decade.

I am tackling the project from hell, dustproofing my old contractor’s saw. I should have just bought a new saw. I have a Rigid TS at La Conner that handles the sawdust much better, and the saw itself works quite well. Off to get a little exercise, and then down to the shop, since this morning is quiet, and I don’t have to be to the office until noon on Tuesdays….....

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1884 days


#2 posted 12-17-2013 05:10 PM

Yeah, LOML and I went to Hot Springs, Little Rock, and Memphis for a vacation right before thanksgiving… I have been working on my truck which is now leaking tranny fluid. That puts it in the category of paying a shop to do that…

I have removed the carpet and tack strip from the living room. I am patching the divots from the tack strip and sanding the floor smooth while abusing the snot out of a HF 4×24 belt sander in the process. I managed to rig it to work with my shop vac cyclone so dust isn’t that much of a problem…

I have to hurry up and get the shop done though. Once the floor is level and smooth, I am going to be milling up plank flooring using plywood… I know it sounds funny, but I have seen it done on slab floors. Mine meters out dry enough it won’t be a problem… so for the cost of some cheap ply, quite a bit of leveling compound, a few sanding belts, some liquid nails and LOTS of labor, I should end up with a good wooden floor…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#3 posted 12-18-2013 04:17 PM

Your wood floor plans sound interesting. I assume you cut up the plywood into planks to allow for movement, and probably for appearance. Can’t see any reason it wouldn’t work. Would you finish all sides of each plank, or just do the exposed surface? I also assume you use 3/4” underlayment plywood, or some such.

The transmission fluid thing is the pits. From what little I know about transmission repairs, it is an arena full of scammers and incompetents. I always use the dealer for my repairs, and part of buying a car for me, is to pick a good dealer. You have one up because of your past experience, and you will be able to evaluate what is going on. Perhaps you know how to pick a good repair shop as well.

I don’t think I am going to ever put a wood floor in my shop area here. I seem to tolerate standing on the concrete quite well, but that isn’t true for many people.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1884 days


#4 posted 12-18-2013 05:45 PM

The assumption of the plywood underlayment is the only part where you are off…

I am slab on grade, I would have to remove every bit of flooring and molding to accomodate 3/4” underlayment AND flooring. The idea is simply to do the following…

#1. Rip 1/2” ply into planks and T&G the ends sort of mimicking laminate. #2. Finish all exposed surfaces except the bottom. This means sanding, sanding sealer, stain, and several coats of urethane. #3. Bond an underlayment to the bottom of the ply using liquid nails. Such that the ply, and underlayment combined are no greater than 3/4” thick, again, slab on grade construction… #4. Install flooring just as I would a regular Pergo, or other laminate floor. Basically it would be installed as a floating floor over the slab. #5. Create and install any new transitions.

I have seen this done in several local commercial installations and it works actually quite well. I can get in around $.75 sq / ft installed by going this way, plus I can get wide planks that I just can’t do with laminate / hardwood. So if I wanted to go with say a 6” wide plank floor, I can…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#5 posted 12-19-2013 04:13 PM

Das a complex…........

T&G just for the ends?

What I meant, was to use underlayment plywood as the flooring, i.e. 3/4” thick. So what kind of plywood do you use for the top part?

I wonder if it would work to have a 3 layer board with the middle layer offset to form the tongue and groove on all 4 edges, thereby avoiding milling. Just brainstorming, this is kind of a fun scenario….......at least for me….......and I don’t have to do the work…......(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1884 days


#6 posted 12-20-2013 02:44 PM

Tongue on one side and one edge, groove opposing, just like the factory made flooring.

I was planning on using 1/2” cabinet grade plywood. And I am not wedded to the T&G idea. if I could get it to work right, biscuits would make for fast work on that flooring with minimal alignment hassles…

The tile / mastic I am transitioning to is a total of 5/8” from surface to slab. My idea here is that I know I will likely end up with a underlayment / plank / adhesive stack that totals just under 3/4” using 1/2” ply and 1/8” underlayment. Transition to tile should be fairly simple with that difference.

Again, the idea is to have the whole thing sort of stuck together, but floating off the concrete flooring. Same way that laminate does.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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