LumberJocks

Not quite in the workshop... #28: Been a busy bugger.... Progress on the lumber wagon, and in the house...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 316 days ago 810 reads 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 27: If I use a Japanese hand saw to cut wood, must I bow to the wood first? Part 28 of Not quite in the workshop... series no next part

I am not sure where I left of with y’all but I have been slammed kind of busy, not much woodworking, but sort of related to woodworking… My recent projects have been..

#1. Upgrade and repair the lumber wagon. My truck is a 2004 Ford F150 4×4 that suffered from some design flaws, and need for improvement to meet my needs better. Specifically the design flaw which is common to all full size pickups built since about the 1980s, suspension components built with “lifetime lubrication”, meaning no grease fittings. Which took out the upper ball joints prematurely. So upgrade time…
—Front end was rebuilt using “Moog Problem Solver” upper control arm assembly, and lower ball joint with greaseable fittings. Synthetic lube used.
—Original leveling kit spacer, and factory shocks and coil springs were replaced with Rancho QuickLift Loaded 2.5” lift shock / springs. They don’t give the full 2.5” of lift after adding weight listed below, but the ride is fantastic, and the lift is about 2” now… Like I said, the ride is MUCH better than stock.
—Trashed front tires removed. Rear 35×12.50/17 mud tire took the best and put it on the spare, about 50 – 60% tread left. Installed new set of Hercules Trail Digger MT 35×12.50/17.
—Rebuilt the brake system with upgraded drilled / slotted rotors, and Extreme duty pads. I needed extra stopping power with the big rubber, and big loads. So far it has worked exceptionally well.
—Due to the lower ride height than I had with the prior spacer, I had some rubbing issues. “clearanced” the rear inner fender liner, and removed some metal from the back of the inner fender. I now have no less than 1/2” space between the tire and any part of the body work.
—Removed my original brush guard, that managed to get salty sand and water inside the lower tube causing it to rust through. Replaced it with a Go Rhino winch mount brush guard. Looks are very clean, good lines to it. And the winch support has already gotten me out of trouble once, and about 4 other drivers in a dirt parking lot during a rain storm out… I do need to fine tune the adjustment on the headlight hoop parts, but aside from that, I am VERY happy with my Go Rhino!
—Installed my Engo E9000 winch that has been in my shop for about a year. Finally got it installed, and the space in my shop reclaimed!
—Installed a fresh set of Pro Comp 130 watt stainless steel 6” off road lights. I left the covers off of my old ones, and caught a rock in the non replaceable lens… Ugh..
—Installed a set of “Pacer Performance” 2.5” rubber lip fender flares to cover the tires. I hated having gravel spewed up on the side of the truck. They don’t keep ALL of the junk off, but the gravel and junk is no longer hitting the body, but rather hitting the step bars, which I am planning on stripping down and coating with truck bed liner material.
—Ordered the items to complete my vehicle recovery kit. I looked at buying a pre made winch accessory kit, which would be great for a Jeep, but everything was sized too small for the 9K lb winch and my truck. Instead I opted to… Kick the B&D router that I hate out of it’s 19” ballistics nylon tool bag and in that bag keep the following items.
—> Keeper brand vehicle recovery strap. Have had this for years. 30K LB capacity. This is my 2nd one, my first was stolen out of my old Jeep.
—> 20K lb snatch block. The heaviest capacity I could find in any pre made kit was 16K lbs. A snatch block should DOUBLE the pull capacity of your winch, so at a minimum I needed 18K.
—> Keeper brand 20K lb capacity 6’ tree trunk saver strap.
—> Smittybuilt receiver hitch D ring shackle and mount. No pre made kits came with these…
—> Generic logging / choker chain, 3/8” chain and hooks. Useful for using sharp anchor points that would shred the trunk saver strap. Harbor Freight cheap, but well made so what the heck…
—> 2 spare 3/4" D rings for connecting straps to snatch blocks, other vehicles etc... Not included in any standard pre made kit.
--> 2
spare winch clevis hooks. I have broken these in use in the past. Need to make sure I have extras out in the sticks with me! Not included in any pre made kit.
—> Jumper cables in a heavy duty canvas bag. I know this sounds funny, but I hang the bag handles over the winch cable to act as a cable dampener in case it breaks… Old trick I learned from my late uncle when we were woodccutting when I was a kid. Not included in any pre made kit, although Rugged Ridge does include a specially made cable dampener in their fancy kit…
—> Pair of Wells Lamont X Large pigskin roping gloves. Standard kits come with effectively large gardening gloves. I can BARELY fit my hands into the X large. And I honestly prefer a roping glove. Moves better with the hands. Even if I bought a pre made kit, I would have to replace the gloves.

#2. Work inside the house.
—Repair drywall in, and paint ceilings, walls and trimwork in the dining room, front hallway, and living room. (Living room about 80% complete, the other rooms are 100% complete).
—Built IT training infrastructure lab, and perform complete structured wiring project based on computer relay rack and a mount board for telephone 110 punchdown block and satelite coaxial cable.

I am next moving on to finishing the living room, then doing the kitchen, followed by some siding repair, and finish the drywall / reconfiguration of the shop.

I think I know why I am tired!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



11 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3645 posts in 1798 days


#1 posted 316 days ago

Looks good from here, but can’t say I understand all the automotive, or the electronic, stuff. But I bet it feels to good to get all those things done…....

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1865 days


#2 posted 316 days ago

Eh, Electronics / IT is my line of work, and automotive was my first career… I must admit though, I am getting kind of old to be ripping the suspension out from under a 4×4 truck any more…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View stefang's profile

stefang

12945 posts in 1967 days


#3 posted 316 days ago

If you had a pickup where I live it could also be used as a portable swimming pool. That said, I envy anyone with a nice pickup like yours (and I guess they are designed to drain off the water).

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1865 days


#4 posted 315 days ago

Actually yes, the beds of pickup trucks are designed to drain. I would think the pickup truck is an American thing, but I have been to Mexico plenty to know they have them there too. They just call the Ford F150 the Lobo down there… There are also a lot of car / pickup hybrids down south. The last similar seen in the states was the Dodge Rampage and Chevrolet El Camino back in the mid 1980s.

I know they sell pickups in Europe. There are members of the Ford Truck forum with my year and model in Germany, Spain, and Portugal… I gather they aren’t exactly popular on that side of the pond though…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3645 posts in 1798 days


#5 posted 315 days ago

My solution to the pickup thing, is to have a van. That works good for me both in Anchorage and at my vacation home where we also have a van. You can haul big items, or piles of grandkids, and it fits my body size and infirmities well. They are a good solution for an old man like me, who doesn’t get off the road any more, and doesn’t haul fire wood, or go camping.

But when I lived in Fairbanks, and quite a bit younger, and did the things I did there, a van just wouldn’t cut it. Too much gravel road, off the road, and general craziness of youth. I usually had a pickup and an SUV in the garage, 4×4 of course. In Alaska, as you might imagine, trucks are a big deal, and four wheel drive anything is common. A number of the younger docs drive a pickup as their personal car, or even a Hummer, and I mean the big original things. It is hard to find a car driven by a physician that isn’t all wheel drive. When it makes good sense to avoid the snow and ice, and just stay home…...we don’t have that as an option.

Well, this weekend I have a little home electronics stuff to do. Sherie needs a new computer, she hangs on to computers until they are obsolete, her current one is a Gateway that is 10 years old. I have to put in a new main router/wireless, I have a temporary in there as an emergency replacement for the one that died. I have to figure out if moving the main phone, a 2 line thing with multiple wireless handsets around the house, will improve the reception throughout the house. Its performance has steadily degraded as every device around it, going through normal replacement cycles, now wants to be broadcast something and be connected to the internet.

So, off to the shop and the honey-do’s….............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1865 days


#6 posted 312 days ago

Yeah, kind of hard to toss a camper in a van one weekend. And a full size freezer the next… But I get the point. Actually I have owned a lot of vans. Mostly the classic split window VW Westfalia… My last one was a 65 with Safari Windows, and BFG All Terrain TA tires…. Yeah I actually USED my VW camper for, well.. a camper… But that was a long time ago now. I have gotten to like being able to pass a guy on horseback…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3645 posts in 1798 days


#7 posted 311 days ago

I never got into the VW stuff, although I looked at them. I had a low end model Dodge Caravan for my son to drive when he was in high school. It was slow and safe, and hauled his skis. It had seats that unfolded into a bed, and I did use that feature a couple of times. The van I have been driving for the last 11 years is a Honda Odyssey. One of the things that clinched the deal for me was the engine. It has 260 HP, and was clocked in the reviews at 7.8 seconds zero to sixty. It really has a lot of zip, and I appreciate that. The Sienna we have in La Conner is not as fast, as I recall, but does get pretty good gas mileage for a big vehicle.

Did move my phone, and that improved the reception range. There was a bank of computers, between it and the rest of the house, and I have a receiver in the shelf over it that has Airplay. And I had two wireless routers at times above it, now only one. I did get the wife’s computer backed up, and the new router installed as well. Now just have to find the time to get a new computer for Sherie, and then the electronics end will be caught up.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1865 days


#8 posted 311 days ago

Those Honda Odysseys are nice vans. But boy are they expensive! My brother and his wife had one. Sold it for a Benz. The Benz was cheaper!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3645 posts in 1798 days


#9 posted 311 days ago

As I recall, they actually added cost to the sticker price at the time I bought mine. There were a lot of them sold in Anchorage. Mine is 11 years old, and hasn’t even hiccupped. The Sienna we bought for La Conner was actually purchased in Anchorage, where we bought Sherie’s car. It was much more expensive than the Honda, but it has a lot more gizmos, because we bought it loaded with every option possible. The Anchorage dealer had dealerships in the Pacific Northwest, and we had it delivered to Eugene, Oregon. We flew down there, visited friends we have known for years, and then went to Portland for some medical stuff. We love the Sienna, and I will probably replace the Honda with a Sienna….....if the Honda ever becomes unreliable. But I am not holding my breath, because that Honda has only 42,000 miles on it. Usually, even if you don’t drive a car too hard, age will finally bring it down, but this one acts like it will last forever.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3645 posts in 1798 days


#10 posted 311 days ago

Oh, another interesting thing about the Odyssey. When Edmund’s test vans that year, the Odyssey easily was the best van. A lot of people in the field said the comparison wasn’t fair, that they were underpriced! So Edmunds pretended they cost $5000 more, redid all the calculations, and they still came out the best deal.

Every once in a while a manufacturer hits a home run, and the product just really works well. Looking at the tests on dust collectors, Delta did the same with their 50-760 dust collector. I bought one in the most na├»ve manner possible. It was before I was an LJ member, never looked on line for reviews, didn’t know a damn thing about them, and bought it because it was the only make and model on the display floor of the local dominant industrial hardware dealer. A couple years later I looked it up, after reading some comments here, and just laughed. Being lucky still is the most important attribute to have in life….......(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1865 days


#11 posted 311 days ago

You hit it square on… Actually. I really did like the Odyssey that my brother and sister in law had. Big, roomy, and silky smooth..

Have had Toyotas in the past, at least the old ones were fantastic vehicles. I had a 76 Celica liftback that I honestly abused through college. Got 458,000 miles on the odometer before I sold it to a friend, who put on another couple hundred. I rebuilt the top end due to a screw that fell off the air cleaner, and put one clutch, and several sets of brakes. Aside from that, not much else… And it was fast as all get out to boot…

On the Delta, I don’t know, but I doubt they make that one any more… If I were to replace my HF 2HP DC, I would either get a full on 3+ HP cyclone though. Or if a regular DC, it would have to be a 50-760…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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