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Workshop Development #49: Making adjustments on the fly... Mortiser bench...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 07-28-2012 08:28 PM 1443 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 48: Miter Saw bench, in glue and screws. Part 49 of Workshop Development series Part 50: More on the miter / mortiser workstation... »

Due to the depth needed to make the Mortiser fence line up with the miter saw fence, I need an inch and a half more depth than I had initially designed in. Not this isn’t a show stopper, HOWEVER, I will likely not build the enclosure for the compressor as I had initially planned. This is okay. The purpose was never committed to covering up the or cancelling out noise from the compressor, but rather keeping the compressor out of the way.

The clamping risers and dust hood for the miter saw remain yet to be done, without the front panel of the compressor enclosure, I need to decide on a different mounting location for the mortiser accessory rack. But that isn’t a huge deal…

Right now, the AC is trying to overcome the thermal load in my shop, once cooled off, I start the cuts for the mortiser cabinet. The side panels will get dadoes for the shelves. The back panel will be dadoed to match. This should make for a much more rigid structure overall, helping the shelves support the gallon cans of finishes and the myriad aerosol cans that will be stored there…

I still need to get the material for the drawers, but I am getting more and more convinced that I sould use pocket screw joinery on the drawers simply to make the assembly go faster….

I am enthusiastic about the pace this is going together, and am very glad that I will have this done. With this done, I can unmount the clamshells from the wall, get the plastic shelving moved and start ripping sheet rock down… Which means… SUBPANEL! Woo Hoo!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



6 comments so far

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1928 days


#1 posted 07-28-2012 10:43 PM

Okay I lied. No dadoes. I am just going to cleat and screw the shelves on…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3678 posts in 1861 days


#2 posted 07-28-2012 11:26 PM

I am waiting for your subpanel so that I can quit worrying about you burning down your house. Also remember, in general, motors with the highest voltage they are rigged for and a proper voltage (meaning no voltage drop) in general will run better and cooler, and last longer. Whew…....when did you say you were going to get that subpanel?.........(-:

Pocket screws…...I got the whole shebang…....and I haven’t used them once. But, they have got to be a better approach to getting up utilitarian shelves and cabinets in a timely manner. I will revisit them.

As you know, I am kinda like you, although not a purist for obvious reasons, and like to see how much I can do with a lot of nothing. My vacation house has a different approach, but still kinda minimalist because I will not do big projects down there. Maybe, just maybe, I will get a blog out soon on the developing shop…........totally offbeat in terms of approach from what you and I are doing now.

Later…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1928 days


#3 posted 07-29-2012 02:48 AM

The tenative Schedule is the weekend of September 14th for the electrical work…

I have very little presently that can be wired for 220V aside for the motor for my drum sander, which is in the build process… I am not 100% sure, but I think my band saw can be wired for 220V, need to check the manual…

It is entirely possible I might just butt joint / screw the drawer boxes. I need fast, and strong. I am totally not worried about pretty. The whole point here is to get the thing done so I can get storage into it… I have discovered more stuff than space on the bottom shelf than I had expected. Too many sanders, not enough shelf. But they will fit in a drawer…

The cubby created by the mortiser cab is perfect for the compressor. I did mess up on mounting the mortiser accessory rack but it works, so for now, it is what it is… And fixing the problem would be a MUCH bigger deal than I am wanting to deal with… A MUCH bigger counter sink would make quick work of the problem, but alas, the holes are way too big for my countersinks.

I am totally psyched for these projects to be done…

Once I am completed with my in progress shop projects I will have the following finally taken care of…

#1. Full depth proper miter saw station with built in clamping risers, and extended fence faces. #2. Proper mortiser stand, insuring the mortiser and miter saw do NOT interfere with the operation of the other. #3. Massively enhanced storage for handheld power tools, routing and table saw accessories, finishes, and my small electronic tools like the studfinder, caliper, moisture meter etc… #4. Total of 100 amps pulled into the shop. 60 amps in 3 circuits dedicated 110V, 40 amps in 2 circuits 220V. #5. Fully insulated, and re-rocked my shop. #6. Re-oriented shop arrangement to take better advantage of the wall / floor space available to me. Particularly re-orient the clamshell cabinets, and place the tool stacker such that the overhead door tracks to not interfere with it, and placement will be closer to the bench where the equipment is actually used.

The sacrifice I have to make to get all this done, the upright deep freeze moves from the kitchen, to the shop. I am less than thrilled about this, but I tend to agree, it sucks up critical space which should be for a breakfast table out of the kitchen.

LOML has already agreed to a shed, 12×16 if we can swing it by the HOA… Everything NOT shop related is going in there. Honestly, if I can swing it, I will figure out a way to put the deep freeze out there! I did size the bench I am working on so that any long stock would be completely clear of the deep freeze in the shop. But boy what a sacrifice!

I started this project out with full intent to go fancy with my joinery, but honestly. I am in a hurry to get this done. Schedule is kicking my backside, and I have to get this done. God willing I won’t regret the choices I made…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3678 posts in 1861 days


#4 posted 07-29-2012 01:55 PM

I have alluded to it before…......butt joints, nails, and glue are a much better joint than people realize. Don’t hesitate to use that nail gun. The trick is the glue combined with a metal fastener of almost any sort. In heavy use areas, dadoes and perhaps glue blocks. Dovetails are mostly an art form.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13822 posts in 1371 days


#5 posted 07-29-2012 02:08 PM

You didn’t lie, you just changed priorities! Utilitarian shop fixtures/fiurniture only needs to be functional. Build it fast, “down & dirty”, so as to get to building the “pretty” stuff sooner. I set out with grandiose plans regularly, but then when it comes down to the actal build, I realize that it is more important to just build it. I can always go back and make a pretty, upgraded version once I determine the originals limitations.

Keep plugging away, the end is near…....

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1928 days


#6 posted 07-30-2012 02:06 PM

I almost feel guilty about the quick and dirty construction methodology, mostly because it is very square, very solid, and will likely still be that way in 20 years, I most likely won’t have an excuse to redo this other than I want to…

Thankfully this bench is designed with this particular shop in mind, and God willing somebody else will be worrying about it in 20 years. I want to be in Oregon by then!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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