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Workshop Development #46: Miter Saw / Mortiser station / Compressor enclosure / Storage bench work came to a grinding halt.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 771 days ago 1907 reads 1 time favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 45: Cleaning up my shop in preparation for the miter / mortising / storage station build. Part 46 of Workshop Development series Part 47: Miter Saw / Mortiser getting done... Dry fit of the miter saw segment. »

Due to a sudden, unexpected, and very unpleasant go round with pnuemonia. I am back on my feet, but know better than to push myself too hard for the next couple of weeks, so instead I got back to Sketchup, and tinkered around with the design some more.

The main section is still going to be 48” wide x 34.75” tall x 36” deep. There will be a partial divider down the middle of this carcass, extending from the front of the case back 24” to provide separation between the lowest part where the router cases will be stored, and to provide drawer support.

There will be 2 rows of 3 6” high 24” deep drawers, with the faces inset into the carcass such that it creates a simply cube look. I am not practicing face frame construction at this time, don’t really want it on this particular cab anyway… (I do have it designed for the drill press cab though!). I also wanted to have the drawers flush with the face of the cab.

I need to double, triple, and quadruple check my measurements, but I will build a dust hood for the miter saw, 24” deep x 48” wide x ? high… Like I said, quadruple check that hieght measurement. The top piece will be shared with the cover for the compressor enclosure, and the right panel will act as the compressor enclosures left side wall.

The mortiser station will be built as a separate box, 12.75” deep x 30” wide x 34.75” high, and will be glued and scewed directly to the Miter saw station right panel. I am planning on 3/4 shelves on this simple cab, to hold various finishes, perhaps I might end up building some totes to organize things like spray cans. Again like the miter saw dust hood component, total height of the back wall of this cab will be dependent on my final measurements, but sized to match the dust hood, and all of it to fit snugly under the workshop library cabinet.

Additional organizers include a 1.5” high x 8” wide x 2.25” deep mortiser accessory tool holder. (already built). Simple 2×4 milled and drilled to my needs.

That’s as far as I have gotten with the planning. I need to finish up 2 sides of the compressor cab. I am seriously considering just piano hinging a piece of ply to the upright front panel to create a door, and hasp that sucker directly to the wall behind it. Doesn’t really need to lock. Just needs to stay closed.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



11 comments so far

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Jim Bertelson

3641 posts in 1790 days


#1 posted 771 days ago

OK, this is late at night, time for bed….......will read it in the morning. Compressor enclosure….....watch the heat, make sure it is accessible. Been there.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1857 days


#2 posted 771 days ago

Enclosure is probably the wrong word.. Compressor protector is more like it. The “enclosure” will be vented GENEROUSLY with a 4” hole saw. I am merely trying to provide a niche to store the compressor where it won’t be prone to having stuff bang into the regulator, or fall into the belt guard etc… It’s a bit on the short side, and I didn’t want to have just any old thing stored over it for fear of having junk fall or smash into it in a moment of klutzery…

And honestly, I couldn’t think of a better use for the space behind the mortiser, which is all but wasted otherwise.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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Jim Bertelson

3641 posts in 1790 days


#3 posted 770 days ago

Yup, I have large 4” hole under the compressor and a slot of similar area on top. good ventilation, but with excellent sound abatement. I am having some trouble visualizing…......meaning graphic conception….......maybe pictures or plans would help (-: (-:

........but I understand the protection idea. Compressors should be seen, but not heard, don’t you think? ......hmmmmmmmm. Sound is an issue, although oil based ones are probably the solution.

Got a sound problem at the vacation house. Gotta work on that….........

Never got around to the vacation house shop pictures…....maybe this weekend when I am not on call.

But I can say one thing. Festool controls dust well for some tools, but not for all…...the miter saw still scatters some chips and dust…....

Later…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1857 days


#4 posted 770 days ago

I don’t have a copy separate from my workshop model handy… But here it is…

http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=445324d0a6c1ea2d16b88961dfc5f0c2

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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Jim Bertelson

3641 posts in 1790 days


#5 posted 769 days ago

Yes, that helps. Behind the mortiser you have a blank area. You need access to drain any water from the tank, which has got to be a problem down there. It looks like you would have access to the right of the mortiser.

By the time I get back in the shop, I am going to have to reinvent my cuttoffs cart, can barely remember what I was doing. But I think the end is in sight, at least with the programming part. Then it is just templates, most of which will be similar structures, just different data (meaning words).

Later…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1857 days


#6 posted 769 days ago

You got it right. That blank area, in the model I just knocked out a black box to represent the compressor space, it’s access is to the right side of the bench. Bleed off of water is a problem, but not as much as you’d think. I can bleed the tank, have bone dry air coming out, and the tank will still be at 120+ PSI… The drain is at the dead bottom of the tank.

The idea is to make the thing easy to service. The door piece to this rig will have the vent holes in it. I figure pointed that direction shouldn’t be a problem as I am going to go out that way with the air hose anyway.

Since I haven’t mentioned it yet, that space between the clamshell cabs is going to be another cab, this one sized to height to the clamshell cabs, but all plywood, and it will have shelves on it for gallons of paint, and stains. Some simple plywood doors with tool holders and spring clips will hold my turning tools.

The idea here is, to get rid of the (not pictured here) 48” wide x 18” deep x 6.5 foot tall plastic shelving units that are there now. I have a LOT of redundant supplies in there, like 6 or 7 bottles of wheel cleaner, 4 or 5 containers of tire dressing, 2 or 3 bottles of car wash soap etc… In this model, non shop storage is assumed to be out in a shed in the back yard. Everything big is mobile except for the lumber rack. There is enough space in there if I were to wheel the table saw to the right side, I could pull LOMLs car in on the left if I had to, for example in weather like we have had all week this week would be a good time to do that!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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Jim Bertelson

3641 posts in 1790 days


#7 posted 765 days ago

Read your post yesterday, but finally got around to replying to stuff today. In my home shop, at least I don’t have to deal with cars, although I admit I store lumber in the garage section forward of the shop. At the vacation home I have to put everything away to allow both cars in. And of course there, having the cars inside is important.

This shop here really needs an space utilization makeover, but at least I have a functioning shop with plenty of room.

The vacation shop will be shoehorned in. I meant to do a blog on the shop, but never got to it this weekend. I am slogging my way through the macro processor for my program, and it is slow go. I haven’t done anything to this extent in the macro type area before, so it takes some real thinking. Fortunately, it just takes general programming skills, and I have brushed on the area before, but mostly command line stuff, and some totally unrelated stuff in flightsim. Fortunately, the macro language only needs variables, basic arithmetic, simple IF statemensts, a CHOOSE facility, and an odd ball RANGE function that can decide which of a set of ranges a value lies in. I guess familiarity with batch files and html stuff adds a little support to my beleagured mind. I remember doing some extremely complex stuff with DOS batch files many years ago. My wife had a yarn store for 7 years. It was run on a simple point of sale program, which included inventory stuff, and every day a backup was run onto tape from a batch file that started the boot and ended the day on the main computer which served as the point of sale register as well. It could even handle an interrupted backup.

But, all that as an apology for my tardy responses and absence from the blogging realm here at LJ’s. I actually have a decent band saw, 14” Grizzly, down in Washington. I plan to get a much more robust one for home.

So looking good there, you have been very disciplined in making a shop that is affordable and competant. My shop at home is closer to your principal than my vacation shop. But there I have a small space, limited time, and stringent restrictions for dust collection and general footprint.

OK, will try to squeeze in a blog sometime this week….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1857 days


#8 posted 765 days ago

I am good for now. The after effects of the pneumonia are mostly gone. Not something I want to go through again. I am still in the take it easy mode though so as to not trip it back into another visit…

I have some detail work to do on the living room trim as paint came off along with the tape, so I have to get there with an artists brush, and redo the seam between wall and trim. No big deal, just tedious…

LOML has decreed that I shall remove the A/C return air vents, strip them, and spray them. She was FAR less than happy with the results from brushing the paint on. I can’t say as I can blame her. I am actually considering replacing the return air vents as they are two different door styles. The one on top has swing catches and is hinged at the bottom, the one on the bottom has retaining thumb screws, and is hinged on the left side. I would prefer the latte as the former is a PAIN to get latched when I replace my filters… Which it is close to time to do… So if I can find them, maybe this upcoming weekend I will be replacing return air assemblies with some better ones. Still going to strip and repaint my originals, maybe donate them to Habitat for Humanity. I know of a few of their houses that could use these…

I have to hurry up and get the miter saw / mortiser station done, and NOW because I need to move storage off of my right wall, once that is done, sheet rock comes down, wiring goes in, inspections get done, then insulate and drywall goes back up. I will be more than happy to be done with that side. Once the goodies are mounted in their final homes, the lumber rack etc… from the other side comes down, rock on that side comes down, insulation and new rock go up, and I will end up with a heated / cooled / insulated / fully powered workspace… This whole shebang will probably end up done by the time I need heat this winter. Even if I had all the cash in the world, I would be happier moving my own stuff around. No matter how much you pay someone else, they don’t care about your equipment as much as you do you know?

I’ve got to get to HF this weekend and grab my own HVLP gun, actually since they are going for $14.99 right now I am going to grab a couple of them. My compressor drives the borrowed HF HVLP just fine, but borrowing the neighbors spray gun all the time probably won’t go over too well, and I like the idea of HVLP to minimize overspray. That ceiling needs to be finished and soon! Especially in the kitchen…

Back to the shop thing. I am not sure I am wanting to repaint the inside of the shop, but if I am going to, I better do it while I have the walls empty. so more spraying for me! Probably pick up a 5 gallon bucket of Glidden bright white semi gloss on the cheap and shoot that. I have a few 2 gallon buckets that are empty now. Just need to thoroughly clean them, and I can use them to mix up the paint / floetrol and get busy with painting that garage…

Long term, I need to reframe the attic stairs out there as well, meaning I will need to rerock the ceiling. NOT something I am looking forward to. But if you saw the way they framed in the opening for the stairs, you’d KNOW why I need to redo it… My city inspector should be ashamed that they let this through like this. Heck my bank inspector should have pointed it out when I bought the house, I would have insisted that get fixed! But oh well… Nothing some 2×12, nails and proper hurricane straps won’t fix…

The neighbor across the way, a younger fellow who has a pair of labs that like to play with our pup, offered to let me temporarily rent his garage while I do the floor in my shop. I know he has an ulterior motive, but I am good with it… He has mostly gutted the inside of his house out, and is working on the trim work now. The rent will be my old Firestorm miter saw. No big loss, and I will be more than happy to help him our where I can. Heck I’d be happy to swap some labor. A LOT of my jobs would go MUCH easier with a second person with some lifting ability to them (my lovely bride is a wee bit short…).

I am definately getting excited about the progress. I am seeing some light at the end of my construction tunnel. My front hallway is 90+ % done, the living room is over 50% done as is the main bathroom. Things are coming together very quickly now, and my old house, well isn’t looking quite so 1984 any more… It certainly looks 2012 and under construction, but I am good with that!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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Jim Bertelson

3641 posts in 1790 days


#9 posted 762 days ago

Tardy, again, same excuse…....working hard at work and at home, so things are done late. Actually, I am commenting only about half as often on LJ’s, and only about half as much. I just have to push through on the programming thing.

You must really be excited about getting the house together, and the shop…........simultaneously yet!!

Re the shop. Paint. Paint it while you can, I wish I had known what I know now, in 1985. I would have painted those walls bright white before I started mounting things on them. One of these years I will paint the shop, but it wil take a lot of work, and I will probably rerun some electrical in conduit just to make it pretty.

Do not miss this opportunity…....paint the shop.

Re the paint. Flat or semi. I guess I would go with the semi-gloss, but you don’t want glare. Once you have the whole thing going, you will have a lot more light. The floor will shine, the walls will shine…....hmmmm.

Look at Dave Owen’s shop….....http://lumberjocks.com/LakelandDave/workshop.

I don’t know whether he used flat or semi, but he was an architect. I notice he has not been active lately on LJ’s, but you might message him and see if he is around. He could give you a professional opinion.

Air vents. Here in Anchorage we have hot water baseboard, and in some of the house we have some pretty extravagant jatoba radiator covers. But at the vacation house, we have air vents. I pull those suckers out of the floor and clean them. We like to make that house sparkle the day before we leave, and clean the place up. Then we come back it is kind of magical. Re the vents, I would think spray is the way to go. Looks good, attracts less dust, cleans off easily. Brushing will leave grooves for dust to collect, and there is a lot of air going by those things.

I don’t think I would allow anyone to move my shop equipment unless it was me, or I was supervising. Agree one hundred percent. Some of our equipment has some critical and almost delicate parts. The alignment and adjustment issues could cost days of work, if handled by people without proper knowledge.

Re having some help…....with my friend Brad down in Washington, I got much done, and with much less risk, when we were installing things in the shop. Yup…...take on the friends offer, and get him to help you with some things. Bet that will be a win-win situation.

You are definitely gonna have a sense of accomplishmet after everything is done. The only thing I have to say is….....do the paint job…..and do the floor. In Washington, the floor and the walls have been done. I don’t know if it will ever get done here at home in Anchorage. Now is the time to do it right. You will love it, and if you sell it, you will get your money back…........

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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dbhost

5378 posts in 1857 days


#10 posted 762 days ago

Actually, not sure if you ever caught on to this, but I have some vision issues. Not as bad as say nbeener’s, but I will take anything that will help visibility. Semi Gloss paint, at least for me, does NOT cause glare that will bother me. On the contrary it will help with my visibility. Dave Owens shop that you linked is part of my inspiration…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3641 posts in 1790 days


#11 posted 762 days ago

Experience, and your own needs trumps all. I would say on average a semi-gloss product would shed sawdust better, but I don’t know that. I have so much of my wall space covered that I could probably get by with a high gloss product. Owen’s shop almost glows, but it doesn’t overpower, at least looking at the pictures.

Have a good weekend, I should be around the internet some, I am just catching up with the week’s emails…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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