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Woodworking projects under way. #21: Not exactly fine woodworking. The water heater stand.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 10-14-2011 03:59 PM 893 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 20: Attempted router inlay fail. Retry, fail again, get a cup of tea... Part 21 of Woodworking projects under way. series Part 22: More work on the water heater stand... »

I while back I had replaced my TALL 50 gallon water heater, with a Whirlpool 50 gallon heater from Lowes, upon installation I found it was substantially shorter, and thus, much larger in diameter. No problem on the height, but the diameter has posed a quandry as the new heater overlaps the original stand base. In the time since installing the heater, I have ripped out and replaced the sheetrock that got soaked, and in turn molded. and killed all the mold in the studs, re-rocked almost everything (that was my priority). In the mean time there was a quick and dirty stand extension built, and while functional, is far from permanent, and even further from attractive… But what to do? Oh well it’s holding up and no one sees it except us so no biggie…

Fast forward to LOML fussing the other day about the heater still sitting there the way it has been for 3 years… I guess I need to do something about it finally…

Now mind you, this thing is completely 2×4 construction, just some of it is ripped to 1.5×1.5”. The extension is 8.5” deep x 23.75” tall and 24” wide. A right triangle addition to that with a rise / run of 8.5” completes it and smoothly transitions to the original wall work.

The construction is a basic 2×4 frame, with some ripped to 2×2 bracing, and a solid 2x top to support the weight of the water heater exactly like the original. Attachment to the original framing will be done with pocket screws, and mending plates giving good, SOLID connections that decades shouldn’t be able to shake off.

As of this writing, the gaps between the 2×4 stock that make up the top / deck surface are caulked up and waiting to dry.

This weekend, I am planning on priming, then painting the top as it has to be installed literally UNDER the existing, in use water heater, I don’t want to have to un-install that to paint… Then comes the easy part, sheet rock, and trim…

I have recently gotten several inquiries from folks about my Chicago Electric 12” SCMS and its accuracy. Just for fun, I chopped up some scrap left over with the 45 deg cut I used for my triangle extension and checked with multiple squares… Dead on… I did discover one problem though. If you are using the factory hold down to secure stock on the right side of the table, and cutting a 45 deg angle to the right, the motor WILL hit the hold down… Spring clamps solved that problem for me though…

Photos will be pending once the caulk is dry and paint is on… Right now it’s FUGLY, but the basics of what I am trying to do are there, and it WILL need trim…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



5 comments so far

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3663 posts in 1264 days


#1 posted 10-14-2011 04:52 PM

I was eagerly waiting after reading this in hopes to find something at the end leading towards building a stand alone shop. LOL

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1984 days


#2 posted 10-14-2011 05:04 PM

Hey, I’ll always accept donations toward that project!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2135 posts in 1861 days


#3 posted 10-14-2011 08:30 PM

I feel your pain in regards to the water heater. I replaced mine about 4 years ago. It was an old one and original to the house when I bought it. Rust did it in and the mineral deposit was so bad it felt like only half the tank drained. Moving it up the stairs was a real PIA. Sounds like you put your ingenuity to work. Fine woodworking or not, these projects help remind us why we have all these big toys.

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1916 days


#4 posted 10-14-2011 10:39 PM

We replaced the hot water tank in La Conner a couple months ago. I didn’t even touch the thing. They put in a new iron stand, redid the strangely amateurish plumbing over it, and carted off the old one, in a few hours. I am not into that type of stuff anymore, although I could have done it all.

I made a deliberate decision that La Conner would not be a work farm for me. Only relaxation. I am not sure how much those stands cost, but I suspect they are fairly inexpensive.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1984 days


#5 posted 10-14-2011 11:22 PM

Nope. Mine is sheet rock and wood… Honestly, if I could find one that actually worked the way it is supposed to, I would love to replace this dumb thing with a tankless, but again, I am in an all electric home…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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