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Woodworking projects under way. #13: Wood Magazine clamshell cabinet part deaux. dadoes cut, now on to the rabbets...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 06-07-2011 04:39 AM 1085 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: Wood Magazine Clamshell Cabinet #2 progress continues, already thinking about my next projects. Part 13 of Woodworking projects under way. series Part 14: Wood Magazine clamshell cabinet part deaux. Case done. On to the doors. »

The parts are cut do width, and the dadoes are cut. I have the door sides and case tops / bottoms cut to width, I now need to cut the rabbets, and cut the door tops / bottoms to size. Progress is going much quicker on cabinet #2 when I am actually working on it, I have learned from my mistakes I believe. The overall height has been reduced 1/8” by my error, but at least I will be able to make up for that error…

I will have to wait until the weekend to get the peg board and hinges to finish up, too stinking busy to run to Home Depot in the evenings until then…

I look forward to getting this one done, and loaded, then I can stuff it with the rest of my peg boarded goodies, and free up the back wall of the shop!

I am happy about this as things are really coming together…

Oh yeah, no pics didn’t happen, so here’s the pics…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



9 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#1 posted 06-07-2011 03:16 PM

Pave the way for me buddy, I am going to be leaning on you. I just can’t see any reason not to make these myself, they are just what I need. Hopefully will get the woodwork done on the minibench before the weekend, then I should be in shape to finish and electrify it.

My BIL from Dallas left this morning, so it is quieting down. Goto do some chores, then down to the shop for some sanding, and making some adjustable shelves. The holes for the gizmos are in, fortunately drilled before I put the pieces into position. So all I have to do it cut the shelves. TS work. And I will edge them with pine strips, already cut out.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1979 days


#2 posted 06-07-2011 04:27 PM

I’ll be happy to give answers where I can…

These projects are going a long way to build up the confidence I need to tackle my own kitchen / bathroom cabinets. The fear I have is the total cost there, I don’t want to cheap out with the lousy particle board cabinets I see so many of my neighbors using, but I am also afraid that I will never recoup the cost of building first class cabinets for this house. It’s not like I am in a $400K + neighborhood here. The last stick of new construction barring the few rebuilds (there have been a couple of houses that burned in my neighborhood due to residents that smoke…) was put in by 1988. And while there is a LOT of remodeling that has been going on in the neighborhood, it is obvious that this is getting to be a mature neighborhood.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#3 posted 06-07-2011 05:12 PM

You would think that birch or oak ply could be used in kitchen cabinets, without busting the budget. I would think the trick is to find cabinet grade material that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg. If painted cabinets would be appropriate, then you could do with lesser grades of material, and patch and fill. Then paint. Or could you just reface your present cabinets?

How about a combination of ply and hardwood, such as oak? Red oak or maple should be reasonably priced and you could dry it good, then mill out any warp. If you could keep the runs of plywood small, interrupted by hardwood pieces, then you could probably build from cheap plywood, and just cull the worst of the warped stuff, and/or cut it into small enough pieces that the warp isn’t significant. I have some warped plywood in my minibench, but I cut it into small enough pieces, and culled the worst of it to make it do.

Guess what I am saying, design the cabinets to make use of slight inferior materials in appearance without sacrificing the structural integrity.

Actually, I am not in an expensive neighborhood either, but there are remodelled and rebuilt homes that are more expensive than the average. Our house is definitely overbuilt for the area, especially the interior, but we are living in it and using it and have no intent to sell it. At least not for many years.

I collected a bunch of HD gift cards for my birthday, so I am edging up on my number to buy a TS for La Conner which will probably be a Rigid. That should be a good compromise on quality and price for a secondary shop. Everybody got me a HD gift card…...no other gifts…....(-:

Sherie did a good job a marketing. Now if only a could get a few more gift cards for Father’s day…...........(-:
Sherie has more invested in her quilting room in La Conner already, than I will end up with in the shop, so I am in a good negotiating position.

Got the bird palace twice a month cleanup done this morning, and now after a little more coffee, down to the shop with the sander and router.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1979 days


#4 posted 06-07-2011 05:51 PM

Painted cabinets would be a lot easier on the materials budget for sure. I have something specific in mind for my cabinets / counter tops… And while refacing is an option, I see no point in refacing builder grade junk cabinets. I actually have something in mind for the kitchen / bath remodel. 3/4” cabinet grade casework, with pecan face frames, and mitered raised panel doors, the frames of Mesquite, and the panels of Pecan. I haven’t decided on the specific color / pattern yet, but I know we want granite counter tops all the way around to replace the laminate junk that is there now…

The good thing is I have access to Pecan trees, and I can every now and again come across millable sized logs gratis on Craigslist. I am sure hiring a sawyer will involve paying some sort of deposit on blades in case of any metals etc… And then there is the kiln drying time. (a friend of mine has space, and a desire to build a kiln, some help with drying / stickering should yield me plenty of lumber, but time is always a problem…)

It’s scary, by the time we get done with all the upgrades we want to do to the house, if it were in a different neighborhood, the house would be worth double what it is now… But due to location… Not so much. But that’s okay. IF we can get lucky enough to find work in the northwest and be able to relocate, I will keep this house as a rental / income property. I don’t really expect job situations out west to get positive until the housing market gets better, and I expect it to get strong here first… (Oregon’s economy has been having fits and starts for the last 40 years that I know of… I don’t figure they are going to even bother leading the country in anything…)

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#5 posted 06-07-2011 06:04 PM

With the wood you are talking about, you may be able to keep it a pretty low budget item, relative to the final product. Even doing the work yourself can incure substantial expenses in kitchen upgrades. I haven’t done any work in the house on purpose, it is just too difficult for me to do it on a schedule. I did a fair amount of work on the first remodel of this house before we moved in. My son could help some, I had a little more time since I was just starting the practice here in Anchorage, and I had a lot more energy. Sherie painted all the ceilings. But the current woodwork is at such a quality level, that it is not realistic for me to help, and I am too busy at work. I may do some stuff in La Conner, however, that is not going to be as fancy.

Oh well, time to get away from the computer….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1979 days


#6 posted 06-08-2011 05:49 AM

I have all of the pieces cut except for the peg board. I have a couple of busy days ahead. Hopefully I can get to finish the cabinet this weekend.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#7 posted 06-08-2011 06:56 AM

Just wait till you are older…......everything will take three times longer…...(-:

When I say this weekend, that means three weeks from now…......

.........anyway, you are doing a good job and steadily improving that shop, it’s really looking good.

Little tired this week, had a lot of call, some unusual work stress…....and I need another weekend off…...

Tomorrow should be easy…....the spirits willing….........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1979 days


#8 posted 06-08-2011 05:13 PM

I am halfway to older now I guess… So does that mean it takes 1.5 times as long for me to get stuff done?

Okay seriously though. Yeah, I kind of noticed it isn’t as easy to do things, get projects done as it was when I was in my 20s, but I also have over time learned to work smarter. Setting up and doing repeated cuts, like my dadoes, and THEN setting up and cutting for the next sizes. Using stop blocks and making my own jigs to do certain tasks. It just makes getting the job done that much quicker.

There is an overall design to my shop, I must admit I have wandered off of it in a couple of places, but for the most part, I am dead on… To get right with my design, lathe, band saw, and drill press need to move… And I need to build a storage cabinet for my drilling accessories… And of course there is the electrical and insulation…

The shop has been a fun project / series of projects itself. I have a long way to go, but boy have I come a very long way… I started out with a Circ saw, a beat up jig saw, a router and cheap table, and a few misc bits and pieces in the beginning of 2008… The fact I got this far is honestly something I am proud of. The fact I got this far while having our household income slashed in half, and the added financial hit of having to take care of a disabled family member is downright astonishing to me… I am still not sure how I am accomplishing this…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#9 posted 06-09-2011 04:31 PM

I know how you are accomplishing this, and you have had a few migraine headaches as evidence….......(-:

You have been pushing yourself. I had to quit doing that a couple of decades ago. If I am tired, I take a nap, drink some coffee, and then go to the shop. So I lose half an afternoon that way. I finally got to the point that I realized that I could no longer handle the stress of work without pacing and rest. That was not my pattern earlier in life. I was pretty much like you….....

So now is the time for you to get things done, because I think the average person loses that ability later in life…better put, we become less productive. I am definitely more efficient than I used to be, but it doesn’t make up for the limits on energy.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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