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Upcoming projects and designs. #15: Wide Drum Sander build, not much, but SOME progress...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 04-07-2011 06:45 PM 888 reads 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 14: Turned handle / block head walnut and red oak scrap mallet coming together... Part 15 of Upcoming projects and designs. series Part 16: Considering design requirements for planter boxes / cages. »

I hesitate to even mention this, what with the quality and thought that goes in to so many of the projects and blogs here, I just figure, this would be a waste of time and reading space, but then again, you never know. Maybe my ramblings can serve as a guide, or warning, whichever, to those wanting to duplicate what I am doing…

My intent is to use scrap material and cast offs to build the drum sander as much as possible. So in that vein, I have sourced (read dumpster dove) some 2×8 cutoffs from a reno site near me. Due to the capacity limits of my 6” bench top jointer, I ripped the lumber to 3.75” (ish) wide sections.

Next up was to run it through the jointer to get a flat surface. It appears there was a good, albeit twisted reason this lumber was pitched. Face jointing it got rid of the twist… Next up was the planer…

Simple quick passes made the top side parallel to the bottom side, and that is after all what a planer is for right? The results were smooth, and the lumber now usable, although somewhat thinner than the original 1.5” at 1” even, but that’s quite all right with me for free wood!

Next up will have to wait for a couple of days. It seems my cheapo Harbor Freight hole saw set only goes up to 2” diameter, and I want to build a 3” drum. A friend of mine has a nice Milwaukee hole saw set, that goes up to 4”, and he has offered to let me borrow the mandrel and cup for the 3” which is where I want to be with this…

I am hopeful that I can actually pull this off without any major problems. The eventual goal is going to be a 24” wide laminated 3” dia drum with a 1/2” center bore for the shaft. (actually I expect it to be slightly smaller than 3” as I will most likely have to even it up a hair after glue up…)

So far for this project, I have…

#1. Scrap lumber to build the drum. #2. Scrap 1/2” rod. Not sure what it came from, but it was being thrown out at my BIL’s auto body shop. The rod is 36” long smooth rod, no plating. #3. Scrap 3/4 Melamine for the table. #4. Scrap 2×4 lumber to build the stand. #5. Not scrap, but will be before it goes to this project, Harbor Freight 1 HP band saw motor. As soon as I get 220V in my shop, I am going to swap the 1.5 HP 220V Dayton motor into my HF band saw… #6. Scrap 4” S&D PVC for dust port. #7. 4’ of AccuLink link belt from Harbor Freight…

Materials left needed to be either found, donated to me, or purchased… #1. 1/2” ID pillow block bearings. #2. 1/2” ID and figure out the diameter pulleys. Not sure what RPM this thing should turn at. Suggestions? #3. Proper switch / box. (I don’t really want to re-use the HF switch even though I am upgrading the HF saw to a much nicer 220V capable safety switch, this is a want, but I want a 110V safety switch / box for this…) #4. Wire to wire it up. #5. Sandpaper / hook & loop setup to finish the drum.

This is going to be a painfully slow build as it isn’t exactly a high priority, but it at least is moving forward!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



5 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1854 days


#1 posted 04-08-2011 03:43 AM

Now this is a project that David Craig will enjoy!!!.........(-:

Fellow dumpster divers.

I will watch with interest…......I who built his safety switch for his table saw….....understands…..(-:

Now the issue is, I don’t have a great reason to do this type of stuff…......but let’s admit it….....this type of thing draws me to the hobby. No, I am not going to build a drum sander. But I watch with great interest. Because I love to design things, and build them. Frustrated engineer…......well, not frustrated, but a career choice closely considered and discarded…....with a little grief.

So carry on. I will be watching and reading…........

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1921 days


#2 posted 04-08-2011 04:51 AM

Funny you should mention it. I started out as a mechanical engineering major in college before differential equations ate my lunch…

The practice wife was an engineer. I am actually VERY happy I didn’t end up in that field. I would probably be up on murder charges if I were with all the B.S. they have to deal with…

Honestly, I want to be building a cantilevered wide drum sander with a 24” drum so it would be 24/48 capacity, I doubt that a wood frame would put up with that sort of abuse. I am VERY tempted to scrounge through my BIL’s scrap steel pile and gather enough scrap metal to fab a proper cantilever frame… I can design it, if I can get the in laws to help with the welding, I might just be able to build it… Another one of the reasons I am taking my sweet slow time to get this together…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1854 days


#3 posted 04-08-2011 06:50 AM

Yes, I too, do not regret my choice. I enjoy my mission, and have many more opportunities in life, where I am.

But, I miss the creativity thing…..so my hobbies fill a small void.

In my profession, I do some unusual and novel things, but on a daily basis, there is not much creativity. At work, I design, and invent things, in a more constrained, but very significant environment. But not on a regular basis. Medicine demands strict discipline, critical review of results, and only incremental changes. Way too much at stake.

Woodworking is a good outlet for me….........and apparently for you.

....but in this matter, I will be the voyeur….......a drum sander is something I would best buy, with my limited time and age.

................I envy your opportunity to do this…........so I will watch….........comment and enjoy…......

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1921 days


#4 posted 04-08-2011 03:33 PM

I encourage you to be very patient on this one then. It’s not a high priority project, but something I can do more or less between projects as a shop upgrade.

Professionally speaking, I tripped into my career entirely by accident. I was studying for a completely different field which I earned a degree, but ended up with a company that more or less loaned me out to the IT manager, who saw I had a knack for fixing computers, and the rest is more or less history. With experience, and more professional training than I can shake several sticks at I am now competing for jobs with guys in India. Thank God that what I do frequently requires I actually TOUCH servers, or I would be in deep doo doo…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3674 posts in 1854 days


#5 posted 04-08-2011 04:57 PM

It probably won’t take any more time than my project table…......mini workbench…...whatever it is. It si approaching the end game. Fortunately, I know it will get a lot of use, since it is just a souped up version of my old project tables that I have used for decades. It will be a good blog item, I think.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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