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Hot Rodding a Harbor Freight Bandsaw. #5: Carter Clean Sweep and MLCS Safety switch installed, mostly..

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 02-01-2011 06:00 AM 3919 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Dust port mods, mostly complete... Part 5 of Hot Rodding a Harbor Freight Bandsaw. series Part 6: The MLCS Safety switch pics... »

My MLCS Safety switch came in today, and mind you, the OEM switches on these band saws have been a point of contention, mostly due to location for me, since day one… So at the very least, I installed the switch mechanically, if not quite yet electrically… The electrical connections will have to wait, there isn’t enough cable attached to the motor to make the run out and back around to the upper post. Yes part of my reason for this install is to get the switch in roughly the same location as the Grizzly G0555 band saws, but with the giant STOP paddle arrangement. I figure sometime this weekend I may carve enough time out to rewire this and install a blank electrical cover plate where the OEM switch goes…

While I was in to the saw, I finally got up off my backside and installed the Carter Clean Sweep as well, as part of the install I gave the tires both a good cleaning… Hopefully this works as well as it looks like it should…

About the only things left to do to this band saw is urethane tires, but the OE ones are holding up well, so no need yet, and a magnetic work lamp, that I can move over to the lathe or drill press when needed…

This band saw has been a fun project in itself.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



10 comments so far

View lilredweldingrod's profile

lilredweldingrod

2495 posts in 1861 days


#1 posted 02-01-2011 07:02 AM

That MLCS switch is a sweety. I have another for my router table. The Carter clean sweep works very well, but I still want to add a DC port. What hp motor do you have on yours?

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1928 days


#2 posted 02-01-2011 07:03 AM

It’s just …. fun to give your power tools the love and attention they deserve :-)

-- -- Neil

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1986 days


#3 posted 02-01-2011 05:05 PM

My band saw has the OEM 1HP motor, I am hoping to swap it out this summer for a Dayton 1.5 HP motor I dug up from a friend and had rebuilt.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3686 posts in 1918 days


#4 posted 02-02-2011 07:35 AM

Neil
Re love and attention, your miter saw may be a swinger, but don’t plant a kiss on the moving parts…......in an impassioned moment…......(-:

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1986 days


#5 posted 02-02-2011 02:25 PM

OUCH! That’s just a mean thought Jim!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1928 days


#6 posted 02-02-2011 03:49 PM

Is the Dayton a one-for-one swap, far as you know ? Switch, RPM, etc., etc., etc.

Jim ? I hope you can understand my typing. Like our President, I recently suffered a fairly nasty cut to my lip … that … um …. I’d rather NOT talk about ;-)

-- -- Neil

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1986 days


#7 posted 02-02-2011 04:30 PM

Neil,

The MLCS switch is configurable for 110 / 220, the frame size is the same, and the RPM on both I believe is 1750, I know the Dayton is 1750, and I THINK the HF bandsaw is 1750… If not, the Dayton will make one whopper of a motor for my as yet to be built wide drum sander…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3686 posts in 1918 days


#8 posted 02-02-2011 07:49 PM

I don’t know what that motor cost you, but the 1.5 hp motors in my shop, the Delta TS and the Delta DC sure are good. But there is definitely a difference between the two, with the DC motor probably being the more powerful. That DC was an issue until I put it on 240V. So, even between induction motors with the same HP rating, there are apparently power differences, which I equate with amperage draw. As I recall, the DC had more stringent requirements than the TS for the breaker, etc. Not at home, so I can’t check it out. But the effects were noticeable around the house (had an electrician go through things since then).

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1986 days


#9 posted 02-02-2011 08:17 PM

Yeah, not sure if I mentioned it anywhere, but I do want to run 220V to the shop, and convert the band saw, well honestly, convert as much as I can to 220V. The HF DC and air conditioner won’t go, so I will still need the 3 @ 20 amp 110V circuits to keep everything humming along nicely, but long term goals are…

#1. Cabinet style table saw with 3HP 220V, MUST HAVE A RIVING KNIFE. I am big time sold on these. I have had kickback with regular splitter equipped saws, where similar situations with my cheapo Ryobi riving knife saw easily dealt with… Money being no issue I would love a Saw Stop 3HP PCS, but I might end up in divorce court over that one… I have a few bills get taken care of, maybe as soon as debt is gone, and a few bucks are in the bank… The other, and more likely candidate is the Grizzly G0691… Perhaps an older U.S. built Unisaw if I can fit a BORK to it…

#2. Convert my HF Bandsaw to 1.5 HP 220V.

With these upgrades, that means I will have the lathe, drill press, and dust collector on 110V, as well as the bench top tools.

I need to run the added power anyway before I can complete the band saw conversion… I have no 220V in the shop yet… And not anywhere near enough 110V…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3686 posts in 1918 days


#10 posted 02-02-2011 09:22 PM

I have done away with kickback on my TS, mostly with feather boards and my Vega finger saver (essentially a fence mounted sliding push block that delivers downward and forward force). And I use the stock guard/splitter whenever it is possible, and it has pawls. Haven’t seen a hint of kickback since I hot rodded the saw, with new fence and all, and started planning every cut with safety in mind. A rapid on/off guard is essential to safety, I think, and as I recall your shark guard meets that requirement. My guard goes on and off in less than 30 seconds, with just simple common sense mods. And I use the super sled a lot, and of course the RAS does most crosscut. This old contractor’s saw has been a good saw to learn on, and right now it performs well. Just needs better dust control which is already in process.

We are looking at buying a second house here in La Conner, a town we have haunted for years. Real estate prices have bottomed out here, so there are good values. But if I had a house here I would want a shop in it of some sort. If I buy another saw, it would indeed have a riving knife, and the SawStop might be my choice. But a Grizzly show room is down in Everett, isn’t it? Be tempting to buy Grizzly. But, I am not there yet.

Any place you can use 220 I would do it. Especially important since your DC is 110 only. Another thing you might research is upgrading the motor on your DC…... time, money, and mechanics allowing. Is that DC drawing 20 amps? Then you could use the old DC motor for some other home built tool. Since I put the big saws and the DC on 220 haven’t seen any signs of overload. Leaves the 110 for other tools.

Since Sherie is out doing a little laundry…...I am just sitting around being overly verbose….......oh well.

Later….....

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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