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Workshop Development #15: Router table fence V3.0 is underway!

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 01-24-2011 05:41 PM 1028 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 14: Camcorder is charged up, tripod is ready, need to shoot and edit... Part 15 of Workshop Development series Part 16: Finally, the video shop tour. »

The Ryobi router fence clamps leave a LOT to be desired in the way of stability, so I found myself staring at a pile of 3/4” plywood cutoffs and thinking. I know that’s dangerous, but I was doing it… It finally hit me how to build the sliding faces (I have all this T track and it took me this long?).... So I got busy, not really with a plan of any sort sketched out, but rather, with it all in my head. 24” wide x 6” tall, faces adjust on T tracks, and a fixed face that will have T track (For feather boards etc…). The faces will again be tempered hardboard. And as this is a quick and dirty slap together sort of thing, the joinery is nothing fancy at all, simply glue and screws. A “box” surrounding the bit will be fitted with a 4” dust port from Peachtree (been sitting in my parts bins for a couple of years…).

I have the main body of the fence assembled, I need to cut out for the bit opening, and drill for the T-bolt holes. The faces are in clamps with the hardboard glued on. I need to trim the hardboard flush, and run the dados for the T tracks. The box still needs to be assembled, and some trimming on the braces needs to be completed. So I have a little ways to go.

I do need to hurry up and get this particular project done. I have some pending projects that are being held up for a proper router table fence.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



12 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#1 posted 01-24-2011 06:34 PM

Pictures….......where are the pictures….....oh well, back to the comics page…............(-:

This morning I ripped a slightly warped 2by4, construction grade, using two feather boards, the default guard and splitter (default except that I have modified it for quick removal and placement, under 30 sec), and the Vega “Finger Saver”, which slides along the top of the fence and provides downward and forward pressure. I measured the result, and was on target within less than one hundreth of an inch…......except at one point where the other side of the board narrowed (I am not jointing these). I did this with complete safety. I think I could have done this on my super sled as well, but the setup would have taken more time.

I sometimes wonder if building up the shop has been worth it, but it is at times like this that I realize that I not only am markedly safer, but markedly more accurate. In other words, building shop stuff has been my learning project, and I have become familiar with my saws and other equipment.

I am building a new base for my project table. Made from construction fir and cheap plywood. Nails and glue, and a few screws here and there. It will house the compressor in an enclosed compartment for noise control, and have a place for the nail guns. Just used nail guns for the first time yesterday. Boy is that going to speed me up. I was surprised at the strength of the joints.

Got the new sanders installed and aligned, with DC and power attached. Same for the drill press on its new stand. It is now at the proper height, and is mobile. Got a lot done in the shop this weekend.

Vacation next week, this week will probably be busy….....

Later…....

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1889 days


#2 posted 01-24-2011 11:50 PM

Funny thing is, the Shop Projects are not just skill builders (I am not really learning anything new on this, but rather using established skills), but for me at least, they can be stress relievers. After my experience, and what I have learned building my table saw extension table and my drill press table, i am actually planning on rebuilding both of them so that I can end up with final products with the features I wanted, without the hiccups I had making the current ones…

Just from a me-time perspective, building the shop has been well worth it… It’s a great way to get and keep my head screwed on straight.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View patron's profile

patron

13034 posts in 1998 days


#3 posted 01-25-2011 12:33 AM

pictures of head screwed on straight please

i could use that too

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1889 days


#4 posted 01-25-2011 03:50 AM

There you go, sorry, no head screwed on straight photos….

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#5 posted 01-25-2011 04:59 AM

OK, now I have to see the T-Track, Having trouble visualizing this….......but….......the DC looks robust. By the way, I love this stuff, I think you know, so give me anything you got.

I am going to suddenly come out with a flurry of shop projects and blogs, but I am working to get them done, so am neglecting my LJ duty. My base for the project table is being built, of course, on detailed Sketchup diagrams. It got complicated when I realized I wanted the compressor and the nail guns in the base. But, I think it will be a cool deal. I put a 4 plug box on the drill press stand, so that I could plug lights and stuff into it. I will do the same for the project table base. Think I will drop 12 or 14 gauge wire dropdowns ending above head height in my main area so I don’t have cords on the floor. You know me, I don’t hesitate to run wire around. Gotta be plugged in….....its the modern way.

So this construction lumber and plywood project base should be fun. I gotta work around the warped stuff, but there are only a few critical areas, like with a door or two. I like to do this kinda thing. Your router fence looks like it is the same caliber of plywood I use…...big box. You know, even if it has some warp, the small pieces don’t reveal it…......(-:

Now you are going to tell me it was some expensive select plywood or something…..............doubt it.

Keep the pictures coming, I am following. You beat out the comics page for the day….........(-:

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1889 days


#6 posted 01-25-2011 05:18 AM

LOL…

No pics of where the T track goes yet. That will come tomorrow when I cut the dadoes… Just picture if you will, the back side of the piece laminated with hardboard having a T track dadoed in so the center of it is 1.5” from the bottom. The star knobs will be inside the frame of the fence, 2 on each side, allowing the fence faces to slide. Then the faces ripped 2.35” from the bottom to make the fixed piece…

It will make a LOT more sense once it is done…

Yeah, expensive plywood sure… This isn’t even cheap sanded ply… This is decking grade stuff that I am spending quality time with elmers wood filler and my sander to get somewhat smoothish…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#7 posted 01-25-2011 07:54 AM

I use a lot of sand paper and a lot of elmer’s wood filler as well…...............

Jim

PS
Yup, need more pictures…...........(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1889 days


#8 posted 01-25-2011 04:39 PM

Of course you do :-D….

I need to figure out a glue problem with the extension wing I noticed last night. The hardboard is delaminating along the back rail of the saw… Ugh…

I am only going to sand sliding surfaces smooth, and then coat them with beeswax to lubricate them and make moving them easier…

I just noticed that my workbench top is getting somewhat nasty looking. A far cry from the freshly BLO-ed top of a year and a half ago! This proves 2 things… #1. I have had a lot of projects on this thing, and #2, I need to figure out a way to protect the bench top.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#9 posted 01-25-2011 05:45 PM

You know, I bought a piece of melamine and contact cement a number of months ago, for a jointing jig for the TS I never built. Have you thought of trying that? I will probably build a new top for my router table, but not for another 6 months or more. I thought I might try my hand at laminating. It doesn’t look terribly difficult, although it would be a new skill to learn. Then I would probably use some combination of MDF, plywood, and hardboard for the substance of the board. Haven’t got that far yet…............

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#10 posted 01-25-2011 05:46 PM

PS
The cement and the melamine weren’t dirt cheap, but I got a 4×8 sheet that should be good for a number of projects. Bought the stuff at Lowe’s.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1889 days


#11 posted 01-25-2011 05:56 PM

I have always used Titebond II and Titebond III for hardboard laminations with great success. This is the first delamination I have had. I should be able to inject the gap with glue, and clamp it with some cauls and call it good. The big problem is that the thing is a real bear to remove…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#12 posted 01-25-2011 07:26 PM

I haven’t done much with hardboard in terms of laminations, although I have been tempted. Sooner or later, I will have to try the melamine.

Would you believe I am making a new handle for my portable computer case out of wood? It is a two pieces coming together to make a handle and one half broke. I really only use the handle to toss it up in the airplane overhead, and put it on or off of my carry-on. I always use the strap for longer hauls, but usually it just rides on top of my carry-on. So I am making it simply out of 1/2” dowel, with some solid oak ends, gluing with Titebond III. I have to make two of them, however, so it is a pain. But the case is good, except for the handle. Don’t want to get the handle replaced, it would probably break again. We’ll see how my goofy handle works. Should look alright, I’ll just Watco it with something dark to match the black case. Got to thinking about it since we are going on vacation on Friday for a week.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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