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A journey into the workshop. #73: Testing out the dust collection, and the 4" port on the Shark Guard...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 11-10-2010 03:56 AM 3541 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 72: The air cleaner is installed, making teeny tiny progress as I heal up... Part 73 of A journey into the workshop. series Part 74: Drill press table V 2.0 is well under way! »

So the ducting is installed, the lathe is moved into its permanent position, and the hoses are run to everything shy of the workbench, and the drill press I was able to test the dust collection on the following…

Table Saw lower end and Shark Guard.
Band saw, lower and upper guide ports.
Lathe, dust hood attached to rails behind lathe…

The lathe dust hood disappoints. I have LOTS of strong suction at the hose, just but the hood is honestly too far away from the work. I need to look into this matter further…

The band saw dust collection worked great.

The table saw / shark guard worked better than I had planned for. I had LOTS of plastic dust from where I had sanded down the pipe ends to even them up without having any dust collection hooked up, that stuff was all over the table saw top. Not only did the dust collector keep the blade shroud, belly pan area clean, and kept any dust from coming out from under the Shark Guard, but it pulled the plastic dust from within 6” of the shark guard, over, and into the guard and on to the separator…

And while I still have tons of cleaning to do, I finally had the shop clean enough to be safe to…

#1. Cut the molding pieces to replace the door molding in the guest bath. That is now installed, just needs to be caulked, and painted.

#2. Cut the trim for the drill press table from scrap walnut. The front piece is in glue right now. I am only trimming 3 sides. The glue seems to be holding okay on the edge of the plywood, but without a doubt, I will be adding some dowels to keep things secure. I sure hope this looks, and works as good when its done, as it seems like it should on paper, and in my head…

My back is telling me enough is enough, so it’s time to call it a day. I will hit the shower, take the meds the Dr. gave me, and hopefully catch up with LOML before I drift off to sleep…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



7 comments so far

View hairy's profile

hairy

2108 posts in 2279 days


#1 posted 11-10-2010 04:26 PM

I have an old Delta bandsaw from the 1940’s, and a newer Jet. Both 14”, the Jet is 12” resaw, the Delta is 6”.

I don’t think dust collection was in the dictionary in the 1940’s, so I attach the hose close to the blade under the table with a bungee cord. The Jet has a dust port in roughly the same place. The d/c performs better on the Delta than it does on the Jet.

I try to use d/c on the lathe as much as possible, but it really only works good for sanding. Again, I use bungees to hold the hose in place. When I’m roughing out a blank, or just cutting down a piece, all the big stuff gets thrown on my side of the lathe.

If you get it figured out, please post it. I’m all about getting good dust collection.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1978 days


#2 posted 11-10-2010 04:42 PM

Hairy, you nailed it right there. The problem is that the shavings, and even the fines taken off with the chisel spew everywhere, it’s the sanding stuff, the stuff that I work from the bottom side of the work piece, that pulls back toward the dust hood that get sucked in… I am reasonably sure there has to be a solution, it’s just not obvious…

My HF 14” Band saw DC was pitiful from the factory. I took and ran a 4” hose / port (S&D cutoff) to just under the table by the blade guide, and then just ran a 2.5” hose to the upper blade guide attached with a zip tie. It works, far better than I expected…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#3 posted 11-11-2010 06:13 PM

I still have inadequate table saw DC. The RAS does pretty well, in fact I wouldn’t dream of using it without the DC. I have above and below table DC with the drill press, that works well also.

Have to do a recertification on neonatal resuscitation tomorrow, so have been studying. This occurs every two years. I will be scarce today and tomorrow morning. I have never used neonatal resuscitation in the last 25 years because we nearly always have neonatal intensive care people around. This is one of those redundant safeguards, just like in the airline industry. But it is a pain….......nonetheless.

Later…...............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1978 days


#4 posted 11-11-2010 10:38 PM

I’ll take your neonatal resuscitation if you take my RHCE for RHEL 5… I am close, but not quite ready to take that test… Then I start working on the RHCA (RHCE = Red Hat Certified Engineer, RHCA = Red Hat Certified Architect, MUCH harder to get than the RHCE)...

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#5 posted 11-12-2010 04:07 AM

Frankly the neonatal resuscitation thing isn’t that hard, probably about 30 hours of prep time. I’ll bet your Linux stuff is harder…...........and takes more time.

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5387 posts in 1978 days


#6 posted 11-12-2010 06:47 AM

LOL, I bet…

FWIW, I have been doing a LOT of router work tonight (trimming the walnut edging on the new drill press table) and with no dust collection for the router, found out just how much of a hazard sawdust in the air is… I managed to get dust in my eye. Talk about irritating! Now I need to do some research on how to collect dust while routing. I think it might be time to build a downdraft box.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3685 posts in 1911 days


#7 posted 11-12-2010 07:17 AM

I am going to see how DeDuster does, you know, the multi headed dust buster I just built. The problem with dust boxes, and of course my Dusty, the bench top downdraft table is one of them, they normally are not built with ways to secure or clamp things. Hence, DeDuster. He goes to the action. In my shop, the action is going to the project table.

I’ll keep you posted, I don’t know how this is all going to work out. A first class downdraft table with clamping abilities would be big, and I am afraid it would have too many duties and not do a first class job at any of them.

Dusty, the benchtop downdraft table is good for sanding, and not much else. My project table is good for clamping and as I build attachments is going to get better. I can attach DeDuster to the project table in many ways, and as I work with the thing, I will probably get insights.

I am certainly not recommending anything, I am just experimenting. But dust collection is a bear….........

Jim

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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