LumberJocks

A journey into the workshop. #54: Mor progress on the insulating and HVAC front.

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by dbhost posted 05-03-2010 05:41 AM 792 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 53: Lost suction in my dust collector. Something to look out for! Part 54 of A journey into the workshop. series Part 55: Cleaning therapy... »

After an insanely bad last 3 weeks (you guys were wondering where I was right?) I got back into the shop for a couple of hours this weekend. Not to do any woodworking projects, but to work on the sop environment some more…

I needed this shop time as a sort of Therapy. Like I said, the last 3 weeks have been truly awful. My sister in law went into the hospital due to complications of a long term fight with cancer. LOML and I were supposed to go to Oregon to visit with other relatives, but ended up in Ohio for my sister in law’s funeral. I come back to Texas, and my brother in law ends up in the emergency room for pnuemonia. And then the day he gets out of the hospital, my 14 year old Labrador died… Follow that up with a lousy week at work that ended up with a long term colleague of mine no longer being employed… I am grateful it wasn’t me… So yeah, I needed shop therapy…

Of course my wife wants me to talk about these things….

I guess she forgot about the differences between men and women somewhere over the years… I want to build, clean, fix, or take down something. That is how I am wired.

On Friday night, I spent probably about 2 hours cleaning the junk that came into my shop from my truck tool box off of the table saw, and made places for them, mostly on the black plastic shelving. I also got to test out my new / replacement HF 16 ga finish nailer (warranty replacement, long stupid story, just glad they gave me one that worked). and of course re-pegged a bunch of stuff on my peg board. I am now at the point where I think I am going to need a clam shell type cabinet with peg board inserts.

Friday also saw 4 sheets of 3/4” R5 foil backed foam insulation follow me home. Combine that with a liberal application of Liquid Nails for Projects, and I ended up with one of my 2 overhead doors fully insulated.

I’ve gotten most of my strong tie workbench cleaned off as well. Flower pots, link belts, and all sorts of other unrelated junk just needed to go!

I took the opportunity to fill LOMLs new cedar planter box with potting soil, so it is ready for plantings, and of course took the splitting maul to the stump in the back yard that is waiting to be burned out. I can bury the head of the maul halfway into the stump now. It is ready to be burned out I believe… I will be happy when all that is left of that stupid stump is a hole in the ground…

So the insulation in the attic is done, one of the overhead doors is done, and the stump is ready to get lit when I have a full, dry day to work with… My next steps, AFTER the stump is burnt out are…

#1. Finish pulling out what remains of the back fence including posts except of course the common posts with the neighbors fence sections.

#2. Install my new fencing, including a 36” gate. This will get all that pressure treated and cedar lumber out of my shop finally!

#3. Insulate the second rollup door.

#4. Borrow a friends 10×30 cargo trailer, and try to make my entire shop minus workbenches fit inside. Roll it to my BIL’s storage lot.

#5. Prep and epoxy coat the floor.

#6. Yank every bit of sheet rock from the east, and west walls, and the between doors portion of the south wall.

#7. Install and test sub panel, circuits, insulation etc…

#8. Install fresh sheet rock, tape & float.

#9. Paint entire inside of shop except floor of course, white

#10. Install rack systems.

#11. Move shop back in, and give trailer back…

#12. Run and test permanent DC plumbing.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



9 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#1 posted 05-03-2010 04:08 PM

Gad Zooks! That would take me a whole year. Doing the floor is something I want to do with my shop. It will be slightly easier to do than yours, because I can just boot the cars out for a few days and drag the shop stuff into the garage. I am going to have to address storage here pretty soon, I am kinda edging into it. That would be good goal for the summer, redo the storage, and paint the floor. Don’t want to wait till winter because I don’t want the cars outside then.

About to leave Chicago for Peoria, spend a couple of days down there, then off to who knows where.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1883 days


#2 posted 05-04-2010 02:58 AM

A piece at a time, and it will get done… I need to go buy a couple of cases of beer and call some friends for a BBQ, Beer, and Sheetrock party. (Sort of like an Amish barn raising, but beer is involved…)

I have a bunch of friends here that are wanting to help me with this project. (One guy has some boat woodwork I redid for him, another I helped rebuild his walls when termites got to him etc…) Our usual method is the guy that is hosting the party pays for beer, and BBQ or Pizza, and we just get it done…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#3 posted 05-04-2010 03:10 PM

Good system. I haven’t had to do too much heavy stuff lately. I avoid it usually. Sherie can help me with big items, she is nearly as strong as I am. Think that is the way to do it, just a good old barn raising party.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1883 days


#4 posted 05-04-2010 09:51 PM

More often than not, It’s a way of getting a bunch of friends together, and getting something done. We’ve done it this way since before we all went to college…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#5 posted 05-04-2010 10:47 PM

My home town was in northern Minnesota, until I went off to college. My parents told me ‘Leave town to go to school, don’t go to the local junior college, and then never come back. The economy here is on a non-stop slide.’

They were close to correct. My home town is slightly smaller than when I left 50 years ago. Fortunately, even if they didn’t have any money, I was able to support myself totally after my junior year in college, and never had to depend on them again. So I separated from my high schools friends, essentially all of them scattering to the winds as well. All over the country. My college friends did the same.

I am a product and a casuality of the age of mobility, need to go elsewhere for education when you live in a small town, the waning of small town life, mandatory miltary service, and the needs of my profession.

I suspect if I wanted some people to help, I could make it happen, but usually it just gets hired done due to my age, and the age of most of my friends.

........I didn’t really look at what was happening to me in life, until I got some perspective, many years later, and wondered why I was different, than some other people. That old saying, ‘life is what happens to you while you are making plans’, really makes a lot of sense to me…............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1883 days


#6 posted 05-04-2010 11:24 PM

Funny, I not only left my home town, and home state, but the entire region… My profession is as much a product of happy accident as it was intentional study and planning. Due to the strength of the Houston economy, most of my college friends are still here, for better or worse…

There are tasks that get hired out to professionals, and of course there are tasks that get hired out to strong backs and weak minds (shovel operation springs to mind). But things like insulation and sheet rocking is oddly enough, kind of fun…

I think age has something to do with it as well. We don’t get together for projects quite as much as we used to, which stinks. Not that I need the help all that often, but I do like getting together with friends and getting stuff done…

One of the big differences though is mandatory military service. I am young enough that military service was not only not mandatory, but when I tried getting into the Navy in 1987, the rules were so tight that due to an eye condition which my brother shares, I was given a PMR (Permanent Medical Rejection). I mention my brother because he joined in 1980 with the same condition, but with worse vision!

I honestly think for me, having friends work on projects with me, and working on friends projects is more of a social thing than a need the help to get it done. If I really needed the help to get it done, well I’m pretty sure there are some young guys that need a few bucks and don’t mind saving an older guys back to make those dollars…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#7 posted 05-05-2010 12:25 AM

This is very strange, but when I want a friend to help me, just for the social value…...........I have them assist me in surgery. One of my best friends, one of my family practice partners, helps me on about 50% of my cases. He has for the last 34 years, except for one year, before he moved to Anchorage to join me. Another few older friends help me occasionally. I just say to my nurse, ‘see if Dr.Soandso can help me, just for the fun of it.’ Different type of work.

Military? When I entered the Navy, early on in medical school, just to select the service, this was the scene. (I did not accept any money from them, but it was very important to select the right service).

I remember every word….....exact quotes…........

The inductor…........’hey you with the glasses, don’t know how you are going to get in’..........pause…........looks down at my info sheet….............’oh, physician. They would accept you with a seeing eye dog’.

Doctors with insulin dependent diabetes, and in wheel chairs, were inducted into the service. They used the real handicapped people stateside. Over 99% of all new physicians went into the military then.

...........a different era…...........

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5383 posts in 1883 days


#8 posted 05-05-2010 03:41 PM

I am guessing… I figure if I had tried to get into the Navy AFTER I got my degree and added training, I wouldn’t have any problem. If I was a decade younger, and more than 100lb lighter (working on that with my Doc and Weight Watchers…) I bet I could get in now…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3657 posts in 1816 days


#9 posted 05-06-2010 03:24 AM

The history of people going into the military includes draft dodgers, and people committing suicide because they were 4F, as WWII ramped up. My-era war, the Vietnam war, was controversial, but I just accepted the fact that I would serve and I did. My profession made my service somewhat different from the vast majority. But it was service none the less, but only had modest danger. That’s because the value to the service of my abilities was high enough, to shield me from risk.

My favorite story about my service illustrates this…......8 days after I entered the military, including all training, induction, medical exams, flying from Oakland to Taiwan, etc. Just 8 days later….. I was standing in southern Taiwan, at a facility, for which I was the Officer in Charge, and there was no one there to tell me how to do it. They got a lot of value, for a modest price. I came fully educated, understanding how to command….....I was expected to learn and adapt rapidly due to my education…......and I did…...........but I didn’t know who to salute….........(-:

My military service was a good experience….....and I am proud of what I did there. In fact it is one of the most important and vivid experiences of my life. It changed me, for the better. And I contributed what I could.

All in all, a good part of my life. I would do it over again in a heart beat.

I know…........ everybody has a different story, a different deal….....................many much harder, much less pleasant…..........but none the less, important.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase