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Upcoming projects and designs. #6: Working on a cedar planter box...

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 1606 days ago 1403 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 5: Back onto the wide drum sander... Part 6 of Upcoming projects and designs. series Part 7: Thoughts on scrap wood. The Hurricane Ike damaged fence saga continues... »

The projects keep getting heaped up on me. Last night was a directive to get the not yet fully refinished cabinet doors out of the shop and back onto the kitchen cabinets. My fault, I have been taking too long with them, and refinishing is only a stop gap anyway, we are building new doors and drawer fronts to give the kitchen a whole new look…

I managed to get about a half hour of shop time last night and finished sawing and planing down the cedar 2×4s to 1.5” x 1.5” actual.

I want to cut a 3/4” x 3/4” rabbet in this stock, and haven’t decided how I am going to approach that. I am considering doing non through cuts and simply sawing out the notch instead of setting up the dado and giving my DC dust bin that much more to hold… However I need to double / triple check the height of my riving knife as I believe the one for the Shark Guard sits just proud of the top of hte blade. If that’s the case, I need to come up with a splitter for my saw before I can do that. And I might as well dig out the dado set then…

Okay the planter box is sort of a silly project. LOML saw these planters at Lowes for something like $75.00 each, and it was PAINFULLY obvious it was made from nothing more than 1/2” cedar A.K.A. fence pickets. Well heck, I had those… and Cedar 2x stock, so I took a quick measurement, asked her how deep of a planter she wants, sketched up a probably bad idea on a napkin and went to work…

Width of the planter is 24”, Depth is 14” and height is 14”. I will use a couple of coats of deck stain, and attach the bronze stars I got at the garden center (see my workshop, the pic of my pegboard has one of them on there) on each end to give it that “Lone Star” feel…

She wants to try to grow bluebonnets in it. If that succeeds, I am going to use that planter, her flowers, my old cowboy boots, and hat for some photo opportunities to maybe make up a very personalized Christmas card for this year…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



5 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#1 posted 1606 days ago

David
Be careful about staining the inside of those planters….....seems to me I remember somewhere about issues with certain finish products and planters and their plants. I had pretty good luck with BLO and planters of various sorts made out of plain old exterior plywood, nails, and exterior quality glue. Those planters never died, and I have a couple that were just used to start seedlings that I converted to use in the shop eventually. The BLO kept them in good shape.

Should get a blog entry today, was working this weekend, had a couple of deliveries, but the telephone was quiet so I got in some shop time.

Like the idea for the Christmas card….........

Later….......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1837 days


#2 posted 1606 days ago

Hmmm…

My thought was on the Deck / Fence stain stuff from Thompsons. Gives it a deeper red tint, and unfortunately I am painfully aware (I spilled about a quart on my lawn a couple of years ago…) it doesn’t seem to phase live plants…

I might look into BLO though. I use it a LOT. I just hadn’t considered it for an exterior project…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#3 posted 1606 days ago

David
I don’t think the exterior is important as to the planter. Also, seems to me the problems are with the preservatives with copper and other nasty metals. I think I built a couple of plywood low planters for seedlings in Kentucky, finished them with BLO, and then retreated probably once or twice over the years, and now they are in use in the shop over 25 years later. I not sure BLO fairs as well in climates like Texas has, so the Thompson’s may be better, especially for the exterior.

BLO is easy to apply though, so when you empty the dirt out when replanting, recoat the interior. At the price for the cedar, this may be overkill, but when I build something, I find it will last for decades with reasonable care, as opposed to store bought, which tends to fall apart quickly.

There is some information about it on the web. I found only one statement that would suggests an issue for use on the interior of the planter here….....http://aoyagisgardenbox.blogspot.com/. At that site there are some other suggestions for the interior of the planter, weed barrier, etc.

My gut reaction would be to treat the exterior with the Thompson’s of your choice, and use BLO or something else on the interior, or nothing at all, might work with cedar.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5378 posts in 1837 days


#4 posted 1606 days ago

My thought was exterior with the Thompsons, interior unfinished. I have done completely unfinished (exterior) cedar planters in the past, and they lasted 10 years + before they grew feet and walked off. (Totally different story…).

The previous planters were of course painted on the inside with several coats of plain black latex exterior paint.

No worries with that at all. Lillies loved those things…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3623 posts in 1769 days


#5 posted 1606 days ago

David
Sounds good to me. I worry about the long hot growing things they are exposed to there, and the tendency of BLO to mildew (apparently pure BLO will not mildew, but you have to make sure it is pure, and does not contain any raw linseed oil …...that’s my interpretation of my web search). Up here, where the degree-days are so low, and the much of the year is below freezing, BLO fairs well.

Seems we both are into BLO for interior stuff, although I use a lot of WATCO nowadays. I had a gallon of clear stuff for one of Sherie’s looms that she sold, so I am slowly working my way through it over the last 15 years or so. Fortunately, WATCO stores well.

Raw cedar lasts forever up here….....unless you put it into the ground.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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