LumberJocks

Not quite in the workshop... #3: Insulation almost done, door seals installed. WOW what a difference...

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by dbhost posted 01-10-2010 05:12 AM 1016 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: But rather above the workshop... Insulating a day late and a dollar short. Part 3 of Not quite in the workshop... series Part 4: Attic insulation complete, outlets installed, curcuit just needs final connection. »

I am now fully insulated in the ceiling with the exception of the last 2 feet before the common wall, and the niche, which has some insulation, just lousy insulation is all…

When I had sunlight out today, I installed the garage door side and top seals on both doors, and while there is still one spot in the doors where sunlight bleeds through (gap between panels) I have now eliminated the breeze coming in through the closed doors. This is something to celebrate!

So now the results…

Current outdoor temp. 30 deg F. Wind of 15 mph.
Current shop temp, 70 deg F. No wind except for the wind I create :-)...

Now mind you, only one of the doors is insulated, and even then, only 3/4 of the way (ran out of Reflectix, and changed my mind on HOW to insulate it…).

The space is presently being heated by a Mr. Heater Portable Buddy heater, admittedly on the high setting…

I think… insulating the remaining attic piece (and continuing through the house…) not to mention the walls, and doors.. will mean that the heater will be sufficient on LOW setting through most weather like this… And honestly, this is oddly cold for us…

If I had it to do all over again, there is one thing I would do different…

I used half rolls that were encapsulated in plastic, and half not encapsulated. The stuff in plastic keeps the fiberglass off of you WAY better… Even with the respirator, safety googles, gloves, long sleeves etc… This was a hard project on the body.

Now on to other, better projects, like burning out stumps and putting up a fence…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



10 comments so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#1 posted 01-10-2010 05:59 AM

Did I say I hate to work with fiberglass? Gets between your fingers, down your shirt, up your nose….........

Sounds like you are nearing success. And the other projects sound more instantly satisfying, although you will enjoy the insulation for a long time.

I thought of you when I read a book, “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind”, by William Kamkwamba and Bryan Mealer. It is an autobiography of William, and it is the ultimate “do it yourself” book, and the ultimate “make do with what you have” book, Authors site. Don’t know what you read, other than wood working machine manuals (-: I read this on my Kindle. Finished it on the plane on the way down here to Hawaii. It has interesting commentary on the impact of religion, and magic, in Malawi, and probably African countries in general. It has a section that drags on about a terrible famine in 2002, but finally ends. That last part is quite exhilarating. It makes it more enjoyable to have a little knowledge about electricity, magnetism, and physics. It’s right up your alley. Don’t know if you have read it, but except for the caveat about the length of the famine part, it is quite enjoyable, and in the end quite upbeat.

Took a nap this afternoon, finally totally relaxed and winding down.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1890 days


#2 posted 01-10-2010 06:26 AM

Woodworking stuff, Tech stuff (A LOT of tech stuff, Linux books specifically…), scripture, poetry (Big fan of Robert Frost), Sci Fi like Orson Welles, Heinlein, etc… and a lot of stuff on history, and the like… From the sound of it, I might just like that book…

I definately inherited the DIY genes from both of my parents… It’s sort of a crazy thing when you think about it… But I learned from bad experiences a long time ago, that contracted labor doesn’t always give you the results you want…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#3 posted 01-10-2010 09:32 PM

I think you would like that book, both from the obvious DIY side, and also from the religion-culture side. It’s not a must read, but, except for the famine part, and I have admit, the author almost made you hungry, it is a good read. The famine part is dragged out a little I think, but the author got home his point well. If nothing else, it points out the necessity of having large scale commerce, to soften the vagaries of the environment in any one region. I haven’t read a lot of poetry lately, but did in my youth. Frost and Poe were a couple of my favorites. I can’t find a good selection of Frost in ebook form. I have the works of Poe on my Kindle. Have you ever read The Brothers Karamazov? I think I am becoming masochistic, because I have a copy of it on the Kindle and hope to slowly work through it again. Heavy on religion, philosophy, ethics, etc.

When I was in grade school, and into junior high, I would carry one of 3 leather bound copies of Poe’s works to school with me. They were not very big, about 3/4” thick, and held about 1000 pages each, printed on what believe they called india manila paper, although all I find is references to india paper, which bulks 1000 pages to the inch. I believe this was even finer. I was entranced by the amount of literature crammed into one of those small volumes. The books had been a gift to my father.

I started to talk more about my Kindle Dx, but will put that in my blog. It is not very useful for books heavy with illustration, meaning most woodworking books. But otherwise is great for my purposes. Suspect it would be good for scripture especially, and some tech writing.

Think I told you before that I am not into Linux because of the legacy stuff I need, and the needs of my business. Don’t read much tech, but I used to. Not counting manuals, reviews, etcl. I read a fair amount of tech news on a regular basis, old habit.

So have to relinquish the computer soon. Sherie and her mother want to talk to Sherie’s brother Doug on Skype.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

13056 posts in 1992 days


#4 posted 01-10-2010 09:47 PM

The more insulation the better. I just read a long article on one of my news websites that this cold weather is the precursor of a major weather change. I won’t go into details here, but basically research shows that the weather is going to be cold like this for the next 20-30 years. I’ll go out on a limb here to say that I believe this prediction. (yes, I am a global warming skeptic) The summers could be cooler too. We’ll see. Anyway good insulation is important. It will keep you warm and save some money in heating bills. Continued good luck with your project.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5385 posts in 1890 days


#5 posted 01-10-2010 10:27 PM

I tend to agree with your assesment that things are getting ready to get, and stay colder for a while. I studied geology for my science electives in college, and you can see through depository record the changes from hot to cold in cycles over time… The Sun heats up and cools off, heats up and cools off, the earth in turn, does likewise…

I am NOT insulating out of any PC agenda, but out of financial responsibility. The summers here are really more of an inspiration to insulate than the winters, but this winter has been unusually cold, and wet.

I’d be interested in that article you read though. Could be interesting…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#6 posted 01-11-2010 02:53 AM

But be careful when comparing Mike and you, David. The Anchorage climate is influenced some by the Japenese current, I believe. But Norway’s, and much of europe’s, climate is influenced by the Gulf stream. David, you are influenced by the Gulf whether it streams or not (-:

The Wikipedia entry seems pretty even handed in addressing the issue Gulf Stream and probably has more technical information than I can handle. Lot of stuff written recently about the cycling of the gulf stream as related to the melting of ice sheets and such, if my feeble memory works correctly. If there are any experts out there, chime in and correct me.

I thought the note about the gulf stream stopping for 10 days in 2004 was startling, I had not heard that before. So thought I would inject a little wind, or is it hot air, into the word stream….................(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#7 posted 01-11-2010 03:57 AM

And here is another link Gulf Stream BBC

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#8 posted 01-11-2010 04:12 AM

Mike
And I too have a lot of skepticism about the political position, because it is not scientific, about global warming. 10000 years ago Canada and the northern USA were covered by a 10000 foot thick ice sheet.

Tell me that global warming has not been around for a while. As typical of politics: exageration, lack of context, posturing, etc all the mental abberations associated with lack of intellectual honesty and integrity are there. There may be a man made acceleration of the phenomenon, but if it is built into the climate cycles of the earth, it will occur whether we accelerate it or not. I think there have been times when the earth was essentially all tropical, again if there is an expert out there correct me please. 10,000 years is a blink of the eye in geological time, cycles short and long are the norm. My question, is there any way to know where we are in the various cycles, long and short term. Apparently, information is accumulating that changes can be quite abrupt.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

13056 posts in 1992 days


#9 posted 01-11-2010 12:55 PM

With all due respect to folks who are concerned about global warming, Jim, I am glad to hear that not everyone immediately agrees with the concept. Younger folks having been deluged with global warming info since they were born, and so it is not surprising that they are convinced of it’s truth. However, these same people are also concerned about the environment, and that in my view is a much more important consideration. We have only one earth to live on, so we should avoid poisoning it. As the custodians of the earth we humans also have a responsibility to keep the planet safe for other species.

This is getting way off the topic of woodworking and beginning to sound like a political rant. I hope nobody is offended by my words. We all have our own opinions and we still don’t know who is actually right or wrong. It reality it wouldn’t matter if we kept our environment clean. That includes land, sea and air. Regardless of where you stand, you might find the article on the link below of interest.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1242202/Could-30-years-global-COOLING.html

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3664 posts in 1822 days


#10 posted 01-11-2010 08:17 PM

I agree with your point 100%. The arguments about global warming should be kept separate from thoughts about environmental protection. Environmental protection is something I agree with whole heartedly.

Yes, best not drift off into politics. Sent you a couple of PM’s and a link or two. Well, off to woodworking stuff….............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase