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Not quite in the workshop... #2: But rather above the workshop... Insulating a day late and a dollar short.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 01-08-2010 04:46 PM 974 reads 0 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Making room and clearing junk out of the way... Part 2 of Not quite in the workshop... series Part 3: Insulation almost done, door seals installed. WOW what a difference... »

This current cold snap has done something I haven’t been able to do in the last couple of years, convince LOML that I need to add more insulation to the house, AND insulate / seal the garage…

I guess morning commutes in the Houston metro area at 26 deg F got her attention…

So last night, the first 3 rolls of R 30 got packed into the rafters above the shop. I have 6 to go in order to fully pack the garage / workshop ceiling with insulation. Unfortunately my local Home Depot didn’t have but 3 rolls of R30 in stock. I have 2 more to check, and 2 Lowes to check tonight.

With the toolbox in the bed of the truck, I am kind of limited to about 10 rolls strapped down, so before the entire house is insulated, I will have a LOT of trips to the home centers…

With any luck, tonight gets 10 more rolls brought in, and new garage door seals. I have to replace some of the trim on my doors anyway, so this is a good time to add seals…

I am looking at by the end of the weekend, having the garage ceiling insulated and moving forward into the main house at least 3’ over the kitchen / laundry room. The garage doors should be sealed up, and Reflectix fully installed on one of the overhead doors.

If I can keep this pace up, I can have the entire shop insulated, doors, walls, ceiling, long before the summer gets here… I’m just hoping I can get some winter benefit out of this project this year too!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



12 comments so far

View Fireguy's profile

Fireguy

132 posts in 1960 days


#1 posted 01-08-2010 06:39 PM

26 sounds like a heat wave to me. LOL

-- Alex

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1956 days


#2 posted 01-08-2010 06:47 PM

Maybe, but for coastal Texas, it’s not what we expect to say the least…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3684 posts in 1888 days


#3 posted 01-08-2010 07:57 PM

If you have to make a lot of trips consider a U-Haul trailer rental. Might be cheaper and a lot quicker.
I don’t know about you, but I sure hate handling fiberglas stuff, haven’t had to in a number of years. Our current house is reasonably insulated, especially the remodeled part. The rest is more modern, so it isn’t bad either. We have a combination of fiberglas rolls, blown stuff, urethane, etc. In any case, I don’t do it myself anymore.

I was going to write more, but I as I look at it, I think I will put it in my blog Maui blog entry just for fun, cause my buddies will be bugging me about it anyway. Will get to photos later

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1956 days


#4 posted 01-08-2010 09:31 PM

IF they have them in the 6 roll cases, and not busted out individually, I can haul about 48 rolls in the bed of my truck, strapped down with cargo straps of course. Honestly, I am grabbing as many rolls at a time that the budget can handle… Right now there are a dozen rolls in the back of my truck, next payday another dozen and so on until the attic is done…

I found out today about the 6 roll cases. The other Home Depot didn’t have them, they busted them out into individual rolls. In the case, they are pretty well compressed…

Over the garage, I have 2×10’s, over the rest of the house, 2×6 (insert obscene mumbling about build quality here…). The original insulation was a fiberglass / polyester blend. The glass fibers are holding up pretty well, but the poly is disintegrating in the hot Texas summers. In some areas, the loft is almost totally gone. I am rolling in new R-19 unfaced in those areas, and will roll out R-30 on top of that and the trusses…

I have one area, about 16’x 16’ above one bedroom where I am simply going to replace the insulation with fresh R-19. I would LOVE to be able to pack up with R30, but I need storage for holiday decorations and such, and the space over the garage isn’t big enough for camping, hunting, brewing, craft. At least the way it currently is. It is only about halfway decked. Part of this weekend’s projects will be to replace the attic decking as I go along, starting at the front of the garage, where it isn’t decked, and work my way back… Taking the T1-11 garbage out in the process, and putting fresh 5/8” OSB decking in…

The rolls they have now are encapsulated with a thin plastic, sort of like an ultra ultra ultra thin saran wrap. Not real durable in appearance, but it keeps the glass fibers out of the air and off my skin, mostly…

I was only able to find one garage door seal at HD today (annoying) but will be heading to another one after I unload tonight to get my OSB, I may have both seals to do this weekend. So if all goes well, the attic will be insulated and decked over the workshop, and the doors will be sealed, trim replaced (have had that in my stock for a couple of months now). The Reflectix on the one door should get finished this weekend. That will leave me with insulating the second door, and then the walls… That will be no fun. I have pretty badly damaged Sheetrock walls… I want to replace the Sheetrock at the same time as I do the insulation… And that should happen around the time I do my electrical improvements…

I AM making progress here, just not as fast as I would like. Then again, that fast would require a LOT more money than I have, and contractors which I don’t really trust…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3684 posts in 1888 days


#5 posted 01-09-2010 07:32 AM

I knew you would be creating, or maintaining, good storage area up there, it would be crazy not to. I was gonna say something, until you filled us in.

I remember in Fairbanks, the temp would drop down to 60 below or more and hover for a week (no exageration), and the damndest things would freeze in the house. We had walled off a quite useless door, and made a great dining room in one section of the old milled log house, with its old furnace and a 2” iron pipe feed system from the furnace, and, fortunately, some copper offshoots from that. The heating pipes in the floor next to that walled over door froze up. I figured out that I had to open up the ceiling in the partially finished basement below, and immediately they thawed out, they hadn’t burst because there was enought antifreeze in the system to prevent that. That was a place where insulation was a disavantage, needed air flow….....no pertinence to your situation, but interesting, your insulating brought it to mind. I had done that in one other place in the house prior to that. Over a period of time, cold like that seeps into the house. My subsequently screened off ventilation is there to this day, to prevent freeze up by that unseen door…...the house is still in family.

Have you ever seen sawdust insulation, my old cabin up near Central, Alaska, nearest town Circle (for the Arctic circle on which it, and my cabin resided), had it. It was not milled log, old fashioned log construction by some gold miner in the early 1900’s, with hemp, at least it wasn’t moss, between the logs. Wood floors, wood ceilings, gas lamps. It is also still in the family. Squirrels liked to eat through that wood floor, so I put a $1.00 bounty on them, which my son collected using my old Winchester repeating 22 rifle.

So much for insulation stories…......never got to my pictures, too many family things going on today, as it should be. Tomorrow brings pictures…...hopefully before anyone else arises….........so I can give them proper attention. Your insulation project sounds like one of those dogged things you got to do and keep after, and finally it is done.

Never have seen 2×6 rafters anywhere, but then, I have always lived in northern climes…....................

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3684 posts in 1888 days


#6 posted 01-09-2010 07:42 AM

Oh, and have you ever seen northern lights, in green, yellow and red, visibly form a pinwheel in the sky and rotate…........one late fall night, I got up to go to the outhouse at that cabin near Central, probably at 0100 hrs, and it was so extraordinary, I woke up my son to come out, shiver, and watch the natural fireworks….....what a phenomenon. Bet Mike and some Canadians can relate to that story…........

......tenuous connection…....but that is the way memory is…............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3684 posts in 1888 days


#7 posted 01-09-2010 07:47 AM

...........and one more thing….....insulation….warmer in the winter…......and cooler in the summer…..........you’ll get some use out of it this year….......you do have that attic well ventilated…...yes?

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1956 days


#8 posted 01-10-2010 12:17 AM

Yeah, my attic has 2 powered turbines. The soffit vents I think aren’t sufficient, but they meet code here. When I re-side the house (yank the stupid Masonite off, and put Hardi Panel on) I am planning on using fully perforated “Hardisoffit”. The stuff pretty much looks like peg board, but with a fake wood texture, and of course made from cement fiber…

I have the bad trim replaced, and the garage door gaskets installed now. 3/4 of the garage ceiling is now insulated, and the difference is night and day already.

My current outside temp is 42 deg F. With the radiator being on for less than 30 minutes, after installing the gaskets and buttoning up the garaage, it is already 65 degrees in there…

I am hoping that once all the insulating is done, I can just pop the radiator on low and keep the space warm even with cold snaps like this

As far as sawdust insulation is concerned, yes, I have seen sawdust insulation before. A friend of mine has a hunting shack that is insulated with cedar shavings he gets from a mill somewhere in east Texas. Definately NOT code, but it’s okay for what he is doing with it…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

967 posts in 1867 days


#9 posted 01-10-2010 12:49 AM

dbhost, if you are set on the hardi soffitt, then of course you will do it. But I know how dang heavy that stuff is, and you will need some help. Here is an option I used in S. Fl. 1/2 in. cdx ply, primed both sides and all end grain and cuts. I cut that to one in. shy of center of soffitt then attached fiberglass screen to the truss ends after I painted them and the bottom of the roof black. I then put up the ply (after painting of course) tight to wall and fascia, then 1×2 (primed and painted) cedar strips around the edges. Use a string for straight and it looks great. There is now a breeze through the attic. During the hurricanes, there was a big breeze!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1956 days


#10 posted 01-10-2010 05:02 AM

I’ve done the Hardi Soffit. Yeah I know it’s heavy, but I have help… I’ve seen soffits done like you suggest, and it is interesting, but I live on a Bayou, and the rats that come up would find a way through that in 5 seconds… Hardi will keep them out.

Of course there are some feral cats in the neighborhood now, hoepfully the rat population will start dropping off…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3684 posts in 1888 days


#11 posted 01-10-2010 06:03 AM

And it isn’t just the rats, squirrels have a knack for getting through screen as well. Had to do away with that stuff on my house….............

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1956 days


#12 posted 01-10-2010 06:28 AM

No squirrels in my neighborhood which is odd… There are a TON of them in town… But rats, rabbits, racoons in the bayou to spare. Rats and Racoons like to gnaw, and rip through anything they can to get into attics…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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