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FWW Workbench under way #2.

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Blog entry by dbhost posted 09-01-2009 04:26 AM 900 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Now where did I leave off? As I recall last I had gotten the legs cut, as well as the rails / spreaders cut. Progress since then has been somewhat slow in coming, but it is coming.

In the interim with the few moments of shop time I can muster, the Birch ply has been sourced, measured, cut, laid out, marked, drilled, countersunk, and lastly laminated. The rails and spreaders have been dadoed, the all thread has been cut and chased.

Quite a bit of work remains though such as for the Forstner bit set to arrive, the counterbores and holes in the legs to be drilled, the dowel holes to be laid out, assembly of the base, final measurement, cut and notching for the lower shelf, install the cleats, install the lower shelf, edge band the top, build the vise mount block, install the vise, install the top, build jaw face block, lay out and drill dog holes, make my own bench dogs, sand the whole thing down and finish it…

Part of my brain is wanting me to dado the legs and rails on the ends to accept a 3/16” peg board panel. The rest of me says no. Not sure which way I am going with this, but I am thinking I need to resist the urge to pegboard this thing…

I have some progress photos, but I will refrain from posting any until I get at least the top edge banded so there is something other than a stack of cut lumber and metal to look at…

I find with the nominal size plywood I am using, I end up with a funny situation. I measure 1-1/16” spacer needed to make my vise flush. Now I have 23/32” ply, which 2 layers is 1-7/16”, and I also have 15/32” ply which teamed up with the 23/32 puts me at 1-3/16”, which gives me just 1/8” shy of being totally flush. I think this is about ideal. But I could be wrong…

This is taking shape really quick for one of my projects. I am totally stoked about getting it done and getting some post workbench work done on it.

I know to a lot of the long timers might think this is a stupid project, but for me, restarting woodworking after 20+ years away from High School wood shop, or even access to the tools this project is another great learning experience for me. And even though it is a shop project, it is a woodworking project none the less, and it is helping me build my skill back up… And that in and of itself is well worth the time, effort, and expense put into it…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com



9 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112298 posts in 2264 days


#1 posted 09-01-2009 04:32 AM

Hey if your nailing two 2×4s together and then that’s your project than that’s cool .no one can say its a bad project. If you have fun and your trying that’s all that counts. Look forward to photos.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View KayBee's profile

KayBee

1009 posts in 1933 days


#2 posted 09-01-2009 07:40 AM

Shop projects are great. And in process pics are in process, not necessarily pretty or finished looking, but, ya know, in process. So show us some, we’ll love them.

-- Karen - a little bit of stupid goes a long way

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1918 days


#3 posted 09-01-2009 03:54 PM

Well it’s nothing to look at yet but here you go…

The legs are kiln dried 4×4s that haven’t spent much time in my shop, so I am keeping them in plastic to try to control the impact of humidity and prevent twisting…

The weather has changed, and it is MUCH drier this week than in weeks previous. This should be interesting…

I did have one problem last night. I went to look for my dowel centers and can’t find them… Looks like I need to make a trip to Woodcraft or Rockler. And sine Woodcraft owes me a glue spreader set… I guess I have to head out to the beltway again…

Rails and legs cut. Rails dadoed.

The Birch Ply cut and ready to get drilled and glued.

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2335 days


#4 posted 09-01-2009 03:57 PM

dont know where you came with the “stupid project” term. I think that a workbench is one of the best projects out there to hone your skills, and get something up and working. looking good so far ;) this is a good bench design.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1918 days


#5 posted 09-01-2009 04:56 PM

Thanks. I am using the bench project to re hone a lot of very rusty skills. I am a little worried about getting the edge banding right, honestly because I have upcoming projects that will need edge banding on plywood, which is one of the reasons I chose to go this route… I am considering using dowels and glue for the edge banding for a decorative touch. But so far the winning idea seems to be biscuits and glue. Not sure as the grain direction changes in the ply, and this ply appears to have 2 plies of MDF as to how well the glue would hold…

I am deviating from the official plan a bit, in order to hone skills they are not addressing YET in their videos, and to come up with the finished product the way I want it…

To be honest, I am glad I didn’t have to use a cutting guide, instead I have a miter saw, and of course the table saw and a helper…

Oh, for those with a sharp eye, the carpet on the extension wing is for the kitty condo project…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2335 days


#6 posted 09-01-2009 05:21 PM

sounds like you have my way of thinking – pushing the envelope a bit further and taking the opportunity to hone new skills when you can.

the workbench is a great project to hone those skills, since even if you screw up- it’s easier to fix, and not as even crucial at times as this is a workbench and will get beaten up anyways.

the videos are rather general, and really talk about the basics, it’s good that you take that as a base, and add more to your liking – this is a true craftsman!

another option for edge banding plywood is using a spline – personally, that would be my choice, as it does not require you to mess around with biscuit cutters, orientation, alignment etc. also a hardwood spline is stronger then biscuits, and all you need it a groove (using a router of your table saw) on both the plywood edge, and the hardwood banding.

one thing to keep in mind when edge banding plywood – is to keep all your edges STRAIGHT! to have a seemless joint with the edge band.

good luck! looking forward to see how it turns out.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1918 days


#7 posted 09-01-2009 05:32 PM

Uh. Spline? Do tell… I have used vinyl spline stuff I got at an RV store on Melamine in the past when I had to rebuild a dinette set in a travel trailer. Kind of this T shaped stuff…

Is hardwood spline line that?

I have also considered using veneer for the edge. I know the grains won’t line up, but at least it won’t be horizontal bands. Remember, this is a lamination of 2 pieces of 23/32” birch ply… So I will have to attach whatever to the edge, and flush trim it with the router…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2335 days


#8 posted 09-01-2009 05:43 PM

you can see spline edge treatment for plywood here

the nice thing about this is that it creates long-grain to long-grain glue contact, which is what you really want.

whatever method you chose to edge band your plywood – youll have to route the edges flush anyway.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1918 days


#9 posted 09-01-2009 07:24 PM

For those interested in the progress of the top… Still not much to look at, but better than just a stack of boards…
Bench Top lamination.

I should note, that bottle of Titebond II is now about 90% empty. Good thing I have at least a gallon and a half of that stuff left… (I use a LOT of Titebond II.).

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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