LumberJocks

Shoe Rack #2: Working on edging

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Blog entry by David Craig posted 01-20-2010 06:56 AM 2732 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: Building the carcass Part 2 of Shoe Rack series Part 3: Time's Up »

For those that are just tuning in, this was originally a quick project for a friend to just have something to throw her shoes on. Crap wood was used, old plywood, nasty aged paint on some of the pieces and now she decided she wants it in the entryway so I have to try and figure out how to make it look halfway decent…

So now I have the carcass built, still needs some sanding and some repair of the cracked plywood areas. That will be remedied by a think layer of sawdust and glue. This will be painted and most of the flaws hidden. This is not a work of art, this is a practical project to hone and practice skills and practice some problem solving. It is my belief that a good woodworker can take some crappy pine and can make it look better. A poor woodworker can take some beautiful walnut and make it look like crappy pine. So while I have been honing my skills, I have been working with the poor stuff, salvaged and found wood.

So here is the task for today. I had to come up with something to hide the plywood edges.

carcass with exposed plywood edges

Not very pretty… Even though painted, the edges will still look like plywood. So this is a good practice session on covering those up. Had I not already fastened the top, I could have built a face frame, which would have covered up most of the edges and just would have left the top edge which could have been covered by edge banding tape or molding. Unfortunately, the top is already fastened so no work with face frames today. I don’t really want to do the edge banding, just makes it look like another box from Walmart and the goal of this is to make it look a little cooler than it looks right now. So, I went with the following plan. Cut a board to length. route the edge on the table router, then trim off the edging. Voila, instant molding. (And I thought Handyman magazine had no reason to nominate me to the Woodworkers Hall of Fame…)

I didn’t go with anything fancy, just some cove edging. The cove would slim the top of the edge down so that there would be very little mixed wood where the plywood meets the board. I held up a piece just to give the general idea -

carcass with cove molding

I will run it along the edges so that the open space is framed. This will not reduce the open space for the shoes to fit and, once mitered and trimmed, it will give a more appealing look.

Now why am I going through such pains to explain, step by step, a process where I am working with a crappy piece of wood in an effort to make a slightly above mediocre piece?

For one, this simple project covers a multitude of basic woodworking skills. It involves routing, sawing, dadoing, rabbeting, measuring, mitering, building a basic frame (which is the starting point of cabinetry, box building, bookcases, etc.) and most importantly, using your head to think through a problem then using your tools to make that thought a reality. And secondly, show other new people out there that not everyone out here is a lifelong woodworking guru. You all are fantastic people, modest, supportive, and very skilled. But I have to tell you all that, speaking from a newbie perspective, sometimes showing your work to you folks is like playing Mary Had a Little Lamb to Eric Clapton. So if there are other new people out there feeling a little intimidated, it doesn’t hurt for them to know that there are others in the same boat who are practicing, experimenting, and starting at the beginning also.

I am happy with the couple hours I got to spend in the shop today. I felt good about working out a solution and putting the plan into motion. It may not be the most original, but it was a good exercise in problem solving and shaping the wood to meet the little vision in my head.

Thank you all for reading, and happy woodworking!

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.



9 comments so far

View woodworm's profile

woodworm

14164 posts in 3056 days


#1 posted 01-20-2010 07:29 AM

A great project and the edging trim work looks very nicely profiled. Looking forward to seeing it completed.

p/s….your shop made clamping square from wood ply looks very nice!

-- masrol, kuala lumpur, MY.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2581 days


#2 posted 01-20-2010 09:40 AM

Now you know how it is
when you desided to enter the hall of fame you get the demands and trouble

Dennis

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2800 days


#3 posted 01-20-2010 12:05 PM

Hey David, I just had a similar problem. I made a fly-tying caddy for my grandson out of Birch ply with box joints. The joints looked ok, but the top rim and a little shelf below showed the ply edges like on your shoe rack.

To make it look better, I sawed a thin strip of solid Birch and sanded it to a consistent thickness of about 1/8”, ripped it into strips a little more than the thickness of the ply and then glued it onto the edges with miter joints and later planed it to the surface with a block plane on the outside edges and chisel inside.

It really improved the overall look and make it into something much nicer. I think with little touches like that we can get a lot more out of our projects. I see you are doing something similar and it should look nice when finished.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2574 days


#4 posted 01-20-2010 02:06 PM

Thanks for the comments fellas.

Masrol – Thanks for the encouragement and the comments. The right angle clamps work really well and are quite simple to make. I had a blog on the process here in case you are interested :)

Dennis – Yep, once family and friends find out you are a hall of famer…look out! Thank you for the morning chuckle.

Mike – Once again you highlight what I love so much about this community. You share a tip on how you resolved a similar problem. Kindly giving kudos at the same time you offer your own experiences. Thank you for that.

And just to give everyone a little chuckle…

I was reading the comments via email. In the middle of these was a comment by someone that said “I like the color” I almost spit coffee all over myself. Then I realized it was for a different project :)

Thanks again all for the read and the comments,

David

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2581 days


#5 posted 01-20-2010 07:20 PM

you are welcome
but it seems to me that I was the only one that had read the tag (humor) and take your word
litterly as they were said and I got confused when read the blog later with the others comments
and said to my self did I missed something when I translate it in my head

Dennis

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2574 days


#6 posted 01-20-2010 07:29 PM

I think you translated it right Dennis. Handyman Magazine has a habit of sending out form letters inviting you to their lifetime membership. The form letter tells you that you got the letter because your work has been “recognized” and that the membership is the equivalent of being in the “woodworking hall of fame.” So I wrote out a sarcastic letter of thanks to the lumberjocks here because I found the form letter so hilarious. Obviously my work is not worthy of such a true honor and others were just relaying their own experiences with the company. It is a legitimate organization and their magazine is excellent, but their advertising is so cheesy and full of ego stroking. But I do believe you got the humor of what I was saying and you were on track.

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 2581 days


#7 posted 01-20-2010 08:42 PM

but I read it as it was a joke from some L Js becourse off the earlyer post of a shue rack you made
and I wasn´t aware off that lausy way of advertising yes I have seen a lot other similar mails from
queer persons and compani´s like those that selling 15000 plans on ebay and the only thing people get
is crap with broken link´s

but I still think you made a good funny story

Dennis

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3154 days


#8 posted 01-23-2010 02:18 AM

Everyday is a learning experience here : ) Nice project …hope to see the outcome soon !

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View David Craig's profile

David Craig

2136 posts in 2574 days


#9 posted 01-23-2010 08:01 AM

Thanks for the kind words Dusty. Yes, there is a wealth of knowledge here and I love sucking it all in :)

-- There is little that is simple when it comes to making a simple box.

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