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Operation Holtzapffel #4: Time for a trip to the sharpener

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Blog entry by Damian Penney posted 03-09-2008 02:28 AM 1101 reads 1 time favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Lumber Acquired Part 4 of Operation Holtzapffel series Part 5: Yup, that's sharp... »

So this afternoon I tried to shimmy my blades around a bit so that the notches in my jointer blades would offset one another. Here is a pic of the knives in question.

Nicked Blades

Well the results were less than satisfactory (this was taken in raking sunlight)

Stripey Board

So I’m going to head to Standard Saw Works in Oakland to get them sharpened on Monday. I’ve heard people asking for their jointer blades to be back beveled, can any LJers shed a little light on this?

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso



9 comments so far

View ben's profile

ben

158 posts in 3336 days


#1 posted 03-09-2008 03:09 AM

Damian,

I can’t shed any light on back beveling, but thought I’d share an endorsement given to me. I haven’t had to sharpen my jointer or planer blades yet, but Jeff Lohr (a professional of over 30 years from whom I just took a 6 day course) swore that American Carbide was far and away the best place he had used for “ship your blades in a box, get ‘em back sharp”, for anything not made by Forrest.

http://www.american-carbide.com/

However, for this to work, you have to buy another set of knives. Sounds like a good excuse to me… ;-)

-b

View jcees's profile

jcees

1015 posts in 3265 days


#2 posted 03-09-2008 03:27 AM

Back beveling is mainly for use on “unruly” woods. The idea is likened to using a high pitch angled hand plane to avoid tearout. Not a bad idea but I wouldn’t do it to my only set of blades. Talk to your sharpener, he might have insights and experiences to relate. Schmooze him. Mine demands tribute in donuts first.

always,
J.C.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1141 posts in 3457 days


#3 posted 03-09-2008 03:30 AM

What are the cons to back beveling JC?

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 3463 days


#4 posted 03-09-2008 06:15 AM

I’m not JC, but I would think that the increased bevel angle would not as work well for softer woods. But, the jointer is not a finishing tool, so you’d probably be okay depending on the angle. Don’t know for sure.

I’d definitely buy another set of sharp blades, so you’ll always have sharp blades at hand.

Daren Nelson is a sharpener and an LJ…he may be able to shed more light…

What type of wood are you making the base out of again? Hard Maple too?

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View jcees's profile

jcees

1015 posts in 3265 days


#5 posted 03-09-2008 06:16 AM

Not so much cons as it is unnecessary, Damian. Cons might be that it wouldn’t work as well on softwoods, the planer has to work harder due to the steeper sheer angle, your sharpener will charge you double for that “extra” bevel.

So don’t misconstrue, standard angles for sharpening are just that, a standard. Which translates into, non-specific one size almost fits all nearly all of the time sort of approach to sharpening. So on any given Sunday any sheer angle is perfect for something and just plain wrong for something else. Kind of like wasabi and peanut butter. Hmmm…

So back to the point, a back beveled set of blades would be most warranted for processing that load of $15 dollar per bd ft. bird’s eye maple and just a waste on pine.

always,
J.C.

BTW, you should have two sets of blades anyway, so have at it, get one set back beveled and save them for the squirrely stuff.

-- When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world. -- John Muir

View Dorje's profile

Dorje

1763 posts in 3463 days


#6 posted 03-09-2008 06:42 AM

Ahh – JC gives good advice – and I love the wasabi and peanut butter analogy…that’s funny!

-- Dorje (pronounced "door-jay"), Seattle, WA

View Daren Nelson's profile

Daren Nelson

767 posts in 3371 days


#7 posted 03-09-2008 02:28 PM

I see I am chiming in a little late J.C. pretty much spelled it out. The pro is a back bevel can (again there are other factors, like feed rate/cut depth etc.) help with tearout on curly lumber for example. But one con is it takes more cutting power on everything else. I use alot of curly/quilted/birdeye/just downright funky wood, I am also a professional sharpener…my own knives are not back beveled. Right or wrong, that’s my $.02

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6821 posts in 3445 days


#8 posted 03-10-2008 02:39 PM

Hi Daren;

That’s some pretty good advice for only $ .02 The idea of a second set of blades doesn’t work.

That just leads to two sets that need to be sharpened, and the need to buy a third set.

I just went through my Forrest blades. About seven of them need to go out to be sharpened. Guess how I ended up with so many… I still have a couple fresh blades, so I think I’ll wait.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Damian Penney's profile

Damian Penney

1141 posts in 3457 days


#9 posted 03-10-2008 02:49 PM

Ha! That’s exactly what I’d end up doing Lee :)

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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