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How to Build a Sofa/Couch #4: platform finished...almost there!!!

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Blog entry by dakremer posted 05-25-2010 11:49 PM 25482 reads 4 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 3: Finished springs, starting on the Back Rest Part 4 of How to Build a Sofa/Couch series Part 5: Sofa upholstery complete, legs next.... »

I am sorry I do not have a lot of time before going to work, so I will not be able to write a whole bunch. I finished the platform today. All that is left is the backrest. I will hopefully have that finished tomorrow, and then all that is left is the pillows, and legs. Here are some pictures of what it looks like so far. sorry this has to be so short, but I am running out of time…if you have any questions, just ask me, otherwise maybe I can post more about it later on – i just wanted to get something posted because I wont have time to do it later tonight. I hope everyone is enjoying and have a great day!

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-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!



14 comments so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2306 days


#1 posted 05-25-2010 11:52 PM

pretty awesome!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112104 posts in 2235 days


#2 posted 05-25-2010 11:55 PM

It’s been cool watching

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Eli's profile

Eli

141 posts in 1664 days


#3 posted 05-26-2010 12:36 AM

This is awesome! Well done on hand tying the springs, too. I’m really interested in upholstery and I’m really glad I found your posts.

How did you determine how much webbing to put? On the seats I’ve done, I fill the space with webbing. But I’m only doing chair seats so far. I’ve been told that tightly knit webbing is European and less webbing is more common to America, or maybe it was the other way around. That webbing with the red stripe is the best kind, though.

Are you using tacks or staples? Any horse hair? Did you sew the cushions, too?

Again, this is fantastic. Keep up the great work and thanks for posting.

Eli

View Russ's profile

Russ

356 posts in 1735 days


#4 posted 05-26-2010 01:09 AM

Awesome work. Keep it up.

-- Russ

View j_olsen's profile

j_olsen

155 posts in 1829 days


#5 posted 05-26-2010 01:11 AM

i’ve always thought of doing a couch but just never knew where to start
with that said—a big thanks for the blog

-- Jeff - Bell Buckle, TN

View Beginningwoodworker's profile

Beginningwoodworker

13341 posts in 2331 days


#6 posted 05-26-2010 01:18 AM

Looks good.

-- CJIII Future cabinetmaker

View smartlikestick's profile

smartlikestick

52 posts in 2236 days


#7 posted 05-26-2010 03:22 AM

That is really awesome. Can I ask how the costs of all the specialized material compare to just buying a couch?

-- -- Mike Beauvais

View Caleb James's profile

Caleb James

149 posts in 1587 days


#8 posted 05-26-2010 03:33 AM

I have been wanting to do a project like this. Nice to see the concept.

-- http://www.calebjameschairmaker.com, http://www.kapeldesigns.com

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2455 posts in 1749 days


#9 posted 05-26-2010 05:34 AM

Eli – The springs were definitely the hardest part!! they took FOREVER to do….but in the end it is worth it because it is a FAR better system than any other spring system (for sofas, etc). As far as the jute webbing – I placed all of my springs inside the platform (on the ground) to see how I wanted to space them out. Once I did that I marked the edges of the wood where the spring rows/columns would be. Then I just stretched my webbing along those lines. I thought what I had was enough, but the more I think about it, i’ve spent so much time making this thing, I’m going to fill the rest of the holes with more Just Webbing to make it as strong as possible. By the way…the “webbing with the red stripes” is called Jute Webbing, and it is definitely really nice, and strong. The twine I used to tie the springs together is also called Jute twine – very strong stuff. I am using staples – not tacks. To hold the twine to the frame i just used some 3/4 roofing nails. And I have no sewed the cushions YET..but plan on it. I started this thing, i’m going to finish it – and do all the work myself. All the sewing is all my own – first time ever doing it. anyways, let me know if you have more questions or if you want more details/help on anything – thanks a lot!

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2455 posts in 1749 days


#10 posted 05-26-2010 05:42 AM

Smartlikestick – Actually I am making this couch for VERY cheap. All the springs were salvaged from people throwing their couches away. So was some of the foam – for padding the arms, etc. I also got all of the dacron (the fluffy white stuff) for basically free – Menards was using it as snow for the christmas display and were throwing it away – I bought probably 50 yards of it for like $5 – dacron usually runs like $4 a yard – so HUGE savings. All the wood (since its just pine) only cost me about $20. The foam will cost me about $60 and the all the fabric was about about $120. Besides that, and staples and twine, and a few other smaller items – thats all the cost. I think it’ll end up being about $200 total once I’m done. But even if i bought all the materials new, you could still build it for cheaper than buying a new one. A “good” new couch, with 8-way-hand tied springs will run you atleast $800-1000. You can get cheaper couches obviously ($400+) but the spring system is not as good, and wont last as long. Plus even better – I built this couch to the EXACT size I wanted. I wanted it really deep, and long enough where I can lay down without bending my knees. So it really al depends on the circumstances. Maybe when I’m all done building it, I’ll put it on craigslist just to see how much I could sell it for!!

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2216 days


#11 posted 05-26-2010 04:16 PM

Very interesting. Did you find plans or some procedure, or did you just figure it out from destroying other couches to harvest the springs? I totally understand being able to lay down on the couch. I’m going to miss our couch when we go cruising.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View CaptainSkully's profile

CaptainSkully

1190 posts in 2216 days


#12 posted 05-26-2010 04:17 PM

Very interesting. Did you find plans or some procedure, or did you just figure it out from destroying other couches to harvest the springs? I totally understand being able to lay down on the couch. I’m going to miss our couch when we go cruising.

-- You can't control the wind, but you can trim your sails

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2455 posts in 1749 days


#13 posted 05-26-2010 04:19 PM

I figured out how to make the couch just from tearing apart other couches! As far as the sewing and springs though, I went to the library and learned how to do it – but then I kind of did it my own way too! Yes, the laying down part is key – after work, no one wants to take a nap in their bed, they want to plop down on the sofa and watch some TV…and thats exactly what I plan on doing :) :)

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View Eli's profile

Eli

141 posts in 1664 days


#14 posted 05-27-2010 02:25 AM

This is a great resource and there’s a very good book about traditional upholstering methods: http://www.evenfallstudios.com/woodworks_library/woodworks_library.html.

I accept your info for info deal and I’ll have a blog on upholstering a slip seat for you shortly. :)

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