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Need to find new storage for my lumber

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Blog entry by daiku1 posted 11-30-2008 11:11 AM 941 reads 0 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

in my current shop, I built home-made storage arms out of 2×4’s and plywood. Most of my lumber is stored horizontally. I would like to move my lumber out of the shop and into a storage building, where I would like to store it vertically. I need to do this to gain some space for a jointer/planer coming my way.

I am somewhat worried about warpage. Can anyone tell me if they have had good luck with vertical storage? Any tricks?

-- jim



5 comments so far

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593 posts in 3437 days


#1 posted 11-30-2008 01:36 PM

Hi Jim,

Here in Japan lumber mills store almost all their lumber vertically, even the really big slabs. The wider and thinner planks though are usually stored horizontally but anything under 6 inches or so don’t. Obviously this is done for the very same space—or lack of—reasons.

I refer you to one of my older posts in case you want to see how it’s done.

Interesting handle that of yours by the way. My father in law is a semi-retired daikusan, as well as his father was. Actually, the later built both homes where we live in nowadays. Now that I think of that, his workshop still has tons (literally) of lumber stored vertically in the same way. Some of them are about 15 ft long and the humidity here is freaking high all year long, so I bet you’ll be safe as long as you isolate the end grain from the floor and put some sort of barrier in it to prevent the increased absorption of moisture coming up from the ground.

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daiku1

24 posts in 3264 days


#2 posted 11-30-2008 02:07 PM

I have always admired traditional Japanese joinery. The handle I picked up after studying Japanese joinery at a local college here in Northern California. We are blessed to have terrific resources for learning Japanese carpentry. I learned marking using Sumitsubo and sumisashim, used a sashigane, marked out using the centerline system and measured in Bu! I also cut my lumber with a ryoba saw, but most importantly, I learned to sharpen my Nomi and plane blades without jigs thru focus and patience. Not bad for a German Squarehead with an Irish bent!

I was lucky enough to participate in the Kezuro-Kai demonstrations here as well. I try to incorporate japanese joinery in my western-style work where possible.

There is nothing like pulling a nice thin shaving of Port Orford cedar on a damp winter morning. Say hello to your father in law for me with much respect.

-- jim

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593 posts in 3437 days


#3 posted 12-01-2008 03:44 PM

Wow, very interesting background you have Jim. Please, share more of that with us, something tells me that you have a lot of interesting stuff to tell us about.

Love the sumitsubo, have an old one my father-in-law gave me a few years back. The new ones are pretty expensive though. I’d never imagined meeting a Westerner who measured in bu! If you are interested I sell carpenter’s squares marked in bu among all the other stuff. Although obviously they won’t show up on stock even when the store will finally be updated. :o)

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daiku1

24 posts in 3264 days


#4 posted 12-02-2008 07:35 AM

To be honest, I didn’t mind measuring in bu, but my ink work wasn’t the best with the “bamboo pen” :) Being a left hander, I had a tendency to smear things like I do on paper! I was lucky enough to acquire a few nice planes from an importer here in the Bay Area, but unfortunately he passed away a few years ago. He operated out of his garage and had a tremendous assortment of natural waterstones as well that he would let you try out before you bought them. So sad to see him pass on. I also was inspired while spending two summers in Fort Bragg at the College of the Redwoods fine woodworking program. Really helped with my hand skills, particularly in planing.

-- jim

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593 posts in 3437 days


#5 posted 12-04-2008 11:39 AM

Too bad about the passing on, this kind of personal relationship in business is almost impossible to find nowadays.

I guess being a lefty doesn’t make things easier for you in such things. You should write in Japanese in the traditional, more formal way, up to down, right to left. That would solve your problems (although it would create another, like learning a few new alfabets.)

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