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Creating Wood Inlay Bandings...A Step by Step Process #13: Wood Inlay Banding Made Easy

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Blog entry by Bob Simmons posted 605 days ago 2575 reads 8 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 12: How to Glue Up Wood Inlay Banding Part 13 of Creating Wood Inlay Bandings...A Step by Step Process series no next part

How to make wood inlay banding the easy way. This YouTube woodworking video focuses on a simple way to make an elegant & decorative wood inlay banding of maple & walnut. The two contrasting hardwoods create a striking design that can be inlaid into furniture, jewelry boxes, pictures frames, and much, much more.

Beginning woodworkers as well as experienced craftsmen can watch the video and quickly learn how wood inlay banding can be easily made on the band saw. The technique for making wood inlay banding on the band saw using cross cut sleds is an idea conceived of and developed by The Apprentice and The Journeyman. Feel free to use this woodworking method when you decide to make your own wood inlay banding.

Your comments are welcomed!

Watch more woodworking how to projects & videos on YouTube…
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...

The Apprentice and The Journeyman
...Learn more, Experience more!

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com



11 comments so far

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7622 posts in 2654 days


#1 posted 605 days ago

GREAT!

More Tips & Techniques on making Bandings!

Really COOL…

Thank you again… you’re doing good!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1616 days


#2 posted 604 days ago

Joe…

A simple and elegant wood inlay banding that is easy to make. Thanks for watching.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Northwest29's profile

Northwest29

685 posts in 1092 days


#3 posted 604 days ago

Bob, another great video. Sure do appreciate you’re taking the time to share your techniques with the rest of us folks. If those pieces get much smaller you will have to use tweezes to do the glue ups. (-;

-- Ron, Eugene, OR, "Curiosity is a terrible thing to waste."

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1616 days


#4 posted 604 days ago

Northwest29…

Thanks for taking a look. You bring up an excellent point.

Part of the curiosity of wood inlay banding is “how did they get all those tiny pieces together.” It seems like the smaller the segments are, the more curious one becomes.

With this in mind, it becomes more of a challenge for the woodworker when creating smaller bandings.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Roger's profile

Roger

14161 posts in 1406 days


#5 posted 603 days ago

Sure appreciate your how-to’s Bob. Very delicate work for sure.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1616 days


#6 posted 603 days ago

Roger…

You’re always welcome. The inlays were just installed into cherry picture frames. That’s for another video though.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View tomd's profile

tomd

1727 posts in 2372 days


#7 posted 600 days ago

I have a question. When you cut your banding strips on the bandsaw what size and tooth count blade do you use ? I ask because you want a realitively smooth cut and narrow cut to get as many strips as you can out of a glue up. PS: Thanks for the video.

-- Tom D

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1616 days


#8 posted 600 days ago

Tom D…

The band saw blade being used in the video is The Woodslicer from Highland Hardware. It is 1/2”...3 – 4 teeth per inch….skipped tooth blade.

It delivers a relatively smooth cut and offers a narrow kerf allowing for a maximum number of banding strips out of the glue up. The blade has performed well.

Thanks for watching.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View MrJesse34's profile

MrJesse34

34 posts in 747 days


#9 posted 586 days ago

i know this is probably silly of me, but what is the blue thing you are using to hold the wood against the bandsaw? I am very new to bandsawing and i’m just using two push sticks right now.

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1616 days


#10 posted 586 days ago

MrJesse34…

Thin Rip Jig info…

Thin Wood Strips Cut on the Bandsaw

Thin Rip Jig articles & videos.

This is a technique that I have developed and works very well for ripping uniform strips on the band saw. The blue thing is a Rockler thin rip jig. It has a roller bearing on the “nose” of the adjustable jig. The jig is on the right side of the band saw blade and is secured in the miter gauge slot by turning a star knob. The roller bearing distance from the blade is the width of the desired cut.

The band saw fence is to the left of the band saw blade. The material is positioned between the fence and the roller bearing. Since the desired cut is the distance between the roller bearing and the saw blade, the wood to be cut always references off the roller bearing of the jig. After each cut the fence is loosened, slid over to the material which is referenced to the roller bearing.

The fence and the roller bearing “trap” the material on each side so that the material is simply pushed straight forward. Using this method, a woodworker is able to safely produce uniform veneer thin strips of 3/32”. I find this method to be much better than the traditional method of ripping veneers.

If you watch more of my woodworking videos, you will see exactly how the thin rip jig is a part of the ripping process.

If you like, you can see all my woodworking videos on YouTube. Feel free to subscribe.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View MrJesse34's profile

MrJesse34

34 posts in 747 days


#11 posted 586 days ago

THANK YOU!!!

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