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Creating Wood Inlay Bandings...A Step by Step Process #9: Gluing Up Wood Inlay Banding

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Blog entry by Bob Simmons posted 673 days ago 1583 reads 3 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 8: The Feather Pattern Part 9 of Creating Wood Inlay Bandings...A Step by Step Process series Part 10: Diamond Wood Inlay Banding - 45 Degrees »

This method for gluing up wood inlay bandings is developed by The Apprentice and The Journeyman for the purpose of arranging & aligning the wood segments of the inlay banding pattern.

To learn more, read the complete article, How to Glue Wood Inlay Banding.

The Apprentice and The Journeyman
.....Learn more, Experience more!

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com



8 comments so far

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7686 posts in 2686 days


#1 posted 673 days ago

Nice demos, Bob… as usual!

In the first video:
There is a 1×3 behind your glue-up… do you have the edge covered with wax or clear packing tape to be non-stick?
Why didn’t you put down the outside pieces first instead of making a special glue-up of them?

Thank you…

You’re keeping our brains a movin… LOL

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Toninho's profile

Toninho

189 posts in 1462 days


#2 posted 673 days ago

It is always Wonderful watch their videos Bob!!
You are a great teacher!
Greetings from Portugal.

-- António Guerreiro https://www.facebook.com/bichosdamadeira

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1648 days


#3 posted 672 days ago

Joe…

Excellent questions you bring up!

”There is a 1×3 behind your glue-up… do you have the edge covered with wax or clear packing tape to be non-stick?”

1.) A board with a straight edge (like a 1 X 3) is important to keep the wood segments in alignment. 2.) Having that edge covered with wax or clear packing tape will keep the straight edge from forming a glue bond to the wood segments. 3.) Otherwise, the woodworker will have to work quickly enough to remove the straight edge before a glue bond is created.

I chose option 3. You will notice in the video that I remove the 1 X 3 straight edge immediately after aligning the wood segments. This is also a good idea in the respect that air will get to this side of the glued up segments thus allowing the glue to cure faster. Note: If it were summertime when it is hot & dry, I would not attempt this route. It would be better to apply wax or packing tape as Joe mentioned.

”Why didn’t you put down the outside pieces first instead of making a special glue-up of them?

There are 2 reasons why…

1.) The outside pieces that you are referring to are two thin outer veneers. Each veneer are of 3/32” thickness. If these were laid down first & then glued, both veneers could start to curl. If that happens, the segments to be laid on top of these veneers would not align as desired.

2.) The video shows a straight edge in place along with blue tape that will accept the 1st row of wood segments. The reason for the blue painters tape is that it allows for a controlled arrangement of the wood segments. It is quite important that these segments are in order as the overall integrity of the banding pattern depends on the good fitting of all the segments.

Thanks for watching and also for asking Joe.

Toninho…

Great to see you again! Thanks for your interest & feedback. My best to all my woodworking friends in Portugal.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Roger's profile (online now)

Roger

14408 posts in 1438 days


#4 posted 672 days ago

You sure have much much patience. Very good

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View Don Johnson's profile

Don Johnson

611 posts in 1415 days


#5 posted 672 days ago

Fascinating to see, and the lack of commentary makes it eerily compulsive to keep watching.

I assume that in years gone by, edge banding must have been constructed in a similar way, but without the use of power tools – bandsaw, planer, sander, etc. – it must have taken the craftsmen a long time to create each section and they would have needed considerable skills to get the component pieces accurate.

-- Don, Somerset UK, http://www.donjohnson24.co.uk

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1648 days


#6 posted 672 days ago

Roger…

Thanks. Patience comes from waiting for the glue to dry.

Don J…

Yes, I agree with you. To cut the components accurately and in a uniform manner, the craftsman needs to have a system that controls each & every segment of the entire wood inlay banding pattern. This is necessary when working with hand tools or power tools. While it is essential to have good solid woodworking skills, it is equally important for the craftsman to understand & adhere to a well thought out system. Better woodworking skills & better systems lead to better results.

Thanks for watching & contributing!

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1749 days


#7 posted 671 days ago

I do understand how I can come around sawing the small pieces with a handsaw
and a cutting box with a stopblock but I still have to be skilled enoff to ripsaw
to make inlaybandings so thin beside smoothing thin pieces isn´t the easyest task
with a handplane … :-)
the old masters realy did know what the tools was cable to do …. respect
are you up for any idea´s and the chalange to show that too…. lol

take care
Dennis

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1648 days


#8 posted 669 days ago

Dennis…
If you are asking me, I would recommend adding a band saw and a few band saw sleds. The band saw is too versatile a tool for me not to have in my shop. Plus, it is peaceful to work with.

I do have ideas how I would handle wood inlay bandings if I were working with only hand tools. My thoughts are…glue the segments up between thick sides. Then cut and plane the sides down so that they form thin outer veneers.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

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