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Let's Make Picture Frames with the Dedicated Miter Sled

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Blog entry by Bob Simmons posted 12-15-2010 07:05 PM 9684 reads 11 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch

“Learning never exhausts the mind.”
Leonardo da Vinci…(1452-1519) Architect, musician, anatomist, inventor, engineer, sculptor, and painter.

Making picture frames in the woodworking shop is fun especially when we have a system in which to work. In this case we are making the frames from picture moulding that was made on the router table and also on the table saw using dado blades. The dado on the moulding will house the decorative wood inlay that we have previously created in the shop. (It is nearing the Christmas Holidays at the time of this writing and we have quite a few gifts to make.)

Cutting a miter for a picture frame

The picture frames that we are making have mitered corners so we are using the dedicated miter sled for the table saw. The sled is set up to cut perfect miter joints and this will allow us to go into production mode as we are building 12 picture frames at this time. Each frame will display pictures that are 5” x 7”. The picture moulding is of a Peruvian wood called Camala.

Discover more about the 6 important steps used to Make Picture Frames.
......................................................................................

Visit…The Apprentice and The Journeyman

..................Learn more, Experience more!

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com



10 comments so far

View BreakingBoardom's profile

BreakingBoardom

615 posts in 1835 days


#1 posted 12-16-2010 01:25 AM

Where did you get all the clamps you use on the mitered corners and what kind of clamps are they? Probably before my time I’m assuming. Which isn’t long ago since I just started woodworking about a year ago.

Update: Just went to your blog and see you have them listed there. Pretty neat little clamps.

-- Matt - http://breakingboardom.wordpress.com/

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7950 posts in 2806 days


#2 posted 12-16-2010 01:39 AM

Yes! The groove was there… I saw it! Seeing is believing…

Another very good video, Bob!

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1768 days


#3 posted 12-16-2010 02:04 AM

Matt…I purchased these clamps early on in my career and have gotten a lot of use out of them. These clamps very much simplify the task of clamping miters joints. They are pure gold. These clamps can be found on my here. Hope you enjoyed the article!

Joe…Yep, the groove is there all right and awaiting wood inlay banding. When you believe, it you will see it. Thanks much!

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View dakremer's profile

dakremer

2492 posts in 1845 days


#4 posted 12-16-2010 04:48 AM

Bob, dont those spring clamps leave little holes in the wood though?? or are those sanded out??

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1768 days


#5 posted 12-16-2010 05:28 AM

dakremer…Good question!

One has to be mindful of the hardness/softness of the wood being used because you don’t want to leave little holes due to using these sharp pointed spring clamps. That could be a real problem especially after the finish has been applied right?

Here’s the deal….
1.) When I am using spring clamps on this project I am fully aware that this miter joint will become a spline miter joint. So the spring clamps are placed where the 1/8” walnut spline will wind up being glued. (The miter joint will be cut on the table saw using a spline miter jig and then a walnut spline will be fit into the saw kerf.)

2.) Once the walnut spline is fit and the glued has dried I will take the picture frame to the disc sander to remove the excess walnut of the spline joint. If there were any little holes in the wood due to the spring clamps they will surely be removed at this time.

If you have concerns with the spring clamps…test it on scrap of similar wood first. Will you be able to sand the project to eliminate the little holes?
.....................................
Aside from this project…There may be instances where little holes could appear. So, a woodworker has to be aware. Maybe he is using to much clamping pressure and maybe needs to back off a little. This is where experience come in play. There are times that we as craftsmen make mistakes and a goodcraftsman learns from his mistakes and moves forward. It is all part of the growing process of being a woodworker.
In a nutshell. I have used these clamps for over three decades. They secure a miter joint better than any other method than I have seen. (especially with curved and rounded moulding where it would be hard to clamp in another manner.) Try them and you will love them.
Thanks for asking.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7950 posts in 2806 days


#6 posted 12-16-2010 05:39 AM

Bob,

“Joe…Yep, the groove is there all right and awaiting wood inlay banding. When you believe, it you will see it.”

If I remember correctly, that was one of your very first videos… or pretty close… (??) :)

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1768 days


#7 posted 12-17-2010 08:06 AM

Joe…The dado for the picture frame moulding was created 3 videos ago. Creating Picture Frame Moulding.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7950 posts in 2806 days


#8 posted 12-17-2010 08:56 AM

Bob,

I was referring to awaiting wood inlay banding
... didn’t we do that a long time ago?

Isn’t that the step you’re about to do… again? :)

Thank you for your great work.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1768 days


#9 posted 12-17-2010 08:57 PM

Joe…The more you work at the craft, the more you learn. The techniques used in the previous video that you are referring to have evolved. The newer videos will also show more details of the process. My goal is to continue learning and to share with those who are also interested in learning. If there is one thing in life that is constant it’s change. As woodworkers we must evolve as well.

“Learning never exhausts the mind.”
Leonardo da Vinci…(1452-1519) Architect, musician, anatomist, inventor, engineer, sculptor, and painter.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7950 posts in 2806 days


#10 posted 12-17-2010 09:59 PM

Yep, you’re right… Keep on a lernin and teachin…

Thank you,
Joe

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

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