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Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band Saw

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Blog entry by Bob Simmons posted 12-09-2010 08:41 PM 5703 reads 5 times favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

“Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.”
Albert Schweitzer… (1875-1965) Humanitarian, Theologian, Missionary, Medical Doctor

One of the challenges in making bandings of wood inlay is maximizing the material. We certainly do not want to cut the banding too thick or too thin as either would be wasteful of our decorative inlay that we took the time to make. We also want to be able to cut the wood inlay to a uniform thickness. Cutting bandings to an equal thickness is a sign that we are on the right track to maximizing our material. So, just how do we get the right thickness that is uniform?

Dial caliper measures the thickness of the banding

Read the complete article…Ripping Thin Strips of Wood Inlay on the Band Saw

Wood Inlay Bandings in Picture Frames

Related Videos and articles:
.....Creating Picture Frame Moulding
.....How to Make Picture Frames with Wood Inlay

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Visit…The Apprentice and The Journeyman

................Learn more, Experience more!

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com



5 comments so far

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7813 posts in 2748 days


#1 posted 12-09-2010 09:24 PM

Very good, Bob.

Question:
I was thinking of using a hand plane between each strip cut, which is easier than planing a thin strip.
I see that you just keep cutting strips one right after the other.
Do I have a point? ... or am I missing something?

I just noticed something else!
At first, I didn’t think there was much of a difference between:

1. Cutting the strips with the blade adjusted for the strip width and cutting each strip AT the fence.

. . . OR . . .

2. Moving the fence & wood to the bearing feather board, cut strip, Move fence, cut, etc. (as being done in this video).

BUT, now I see a distinct difference between the two ways of doing it!

In method #1, the first smooth-edge-to-the-fence is on the First cut only… after that, the rougher edge (just cut) is against the fence making not as easy to push through the cut as well as possibly regenerating a possible problem cut into those that follow…

In method #2, as in this video, the SAME smooth edge is ALWAYS against the fence making each cut as uniform as the first!

Method #2 is, by far, the best of the two methods… Yes?

Thank you.

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2415 posts in 1737 days


#2 posted 12-09-2010 10:30 PM

& here I just use the tablesaw !!!

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7813 posts in 2748 days


#3 posted 12-09-2010 10:35 PM

... and you could make almost twice as much banding (1/3 for sure) using the Band Saw…
... that’s what a Band Saw is for… making “banding”... (ha ha ha) :)

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1710 days


#4 posted 12-09-2010 10:39 PM

Joe…Great questions! ”I was thinking of using a hand plane between each strip cut, which is easier than planing a thin strip.
I see that you just keep cutting strips one right after the other.”

I prefer to just keep cutting strips one after the other. Why? Even tho there are somewhat rough cuts on each side of the banding depending on the bandsaw blade one chooses…it does not matter to me because one side of the banding will be glued into a dado and not seen. The other rough edge of the banding will be sanded smooth once the picture frame goes through the open drum sander. (If one does not have an drum sander then they would need to level this part of the banding to the surface of the picture frame or whatever project piece they are working on. In this instance a block plane and a card scraper could be used.)

“At first, I didn’t think there was much of a difference between:

1. Cutting the strips with the blade adjusted for the strip width and cutting each strip AT the fence.

. . . OR . . .

2. Moving the fence & wood to the bearing feather board, cut strip, Move fence, cut, etc. (as being done in this video).”

Go with #2…There is a huge difference between 1 and 2. _ #2 guarantees accuracy and uniformity (if the fence is in line with the “drift” of the blade.) Keep the material’s right edge against the bearing, adjust the fence along the left side of the material, and cut. Repeat the process. ...(I prefer using a bearing over a featherboard. A bearing jig is stationary. The bearing will roll iwhereas a featherboard can flex. One cannot maintain uniform thickness if there is flex.)_

Also, notice in this video or in previous videos that the material can be pushed part way through the blade and then the woodworker can simply walk around to pull out the rippings from the opposite side. Even tho the blade is still turning …it does not affect the piece being cut. This is a big safety factor when compared to trying to cut strips on a table saw.

Recommendation: Read the articles on my site as well as watch the videos. You will gain a better understanding of the procedures.

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

View Bob Simmons's profile

Bob Simmons

505 posts in 1710 days


#5 posted 12-09-2010 10:45 PM

DaddyZ…Now you have 2 choices! Choose wisely.

Joe…Yes, you will have more banding when using the band saw. This is a big deal if you make your own banding or not. It’s more efficient and much safer than using a table saw. (Perhaps it should be known as the banding saw;)

-- Bob Simmons, Las Vegas, NV, http://TheApprenticeandTheJourneyman.com

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