LumberJocks

Workbench #3: Leg assemblies

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by CrossGrain (Josh) posted 1033 days ago 1392 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Bench Top Part 3 of Workbench series Part 4: Photo Essay »

Last time, I had finished assembly of the benchtop but had neglected to get any pictures of it right-side up. I moved it onto the bed in the spare bedroom near my work area to make room for sizing up the leg stock.


I purchased poplar for the base of the bench since it is relatively inexpensive. I read something recently about poplar not being a good choice for a workbench base (not sure what the reasoning was), but I have already purchased it and done much of the sizing of parts from it. I’ll see how it works and can always replace it later if there is some issue with it. It has to be better than not having a bench at all!

Here are the two boards that I milled up the leg stock from:


To make the legs square, I ripped the stock to twice it’s thickness and crosscut to length to get 8 pieces. Gluing pairs of these pieces face to face gave me the four legs:


With some careful alignment during the glue-up, all that was needed was to scrape off the glue squeeze-out and some light card scraping of the joints to finish up the four legs:


Even though I won’t be moving the bench often once it is complete, I still want to be able to break it down for easier transport. The base will be made up of two end assemblies with knock down stretchers along the length of the bench. Each of the end assemblies will consist of two legs and an upper and lower stretcher, joined by through mortise and tenon. Here I’m laying out the locations of the stretchers on the legs and marking the length of the tenons.


The through mortises are made first on the drill press to hog out most of the material, then using chisels to square them up.


The tenons are cut on the tablesaw – no jigs, no sleds, no dado stacks – I just use the miter gauge at 90 degrees to the blade and keep nibbling away at the waste until a tenon is left. The top stretcher’s tenons are offset to align the top of the stretcher with the top of the legs and keep the mortise wall above the tenon from getting too fragile. Here is one set of legs and stretchers with the joinery cut:

I mark each piece with indications of orientation and each component of a joint with matching marks just to ensure that I can remember how to assemble everything.


A dry-fit of one leg assembly:


I plan to wedge these tenons during final assembly to help ensure a snug fit and add a decorative touch.

I still have to layout and cut some of the joinery for the knock-down stretchers and leg levelers before I can glue up the leg assemblies. More on that to come…

-- Josh, Virginia , http://crossgrain.wordpress.com



6 comments so far

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2244 days


#1 posted 1033 days ago

looking good!

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14583 posts in 1163 days


#2 posted 1033 days ago

it looks pretty good. I wouldn’t worry about replacing the popular. Popular is a little soft, but i’m betting it will last as long as you need it with a little care.

I like the budget idea, and who needs cloths anyway? Although, if I threw a benchtop on top of one of my wifes quilts, she hang me, so either yours wasn’t home that day, or your newly weds.

Nice job.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View CrossGrain (Josh)'s profile

CrossGrain (Josh)

64 posts in 1613 days


#3 posted 1033 days ago

Thanks guys.

@Don W – We’ve been married for 5 years, she was home, and the benchtop was clean—it wasn’t an issue.

-- Josh, Virginia , http://crossgrain.wordpress.com

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14583 posts in 1163 days


#4 posted 1032 days ago

:-)

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Don W's profile (online now)

Don W

14583 posts in 1163 days


#5 posted 1032 days ago

I’ve rebuilt carburetors on my kitchen table, and I’d who knows how many rifles were cleaned and rebuilt there. I am glad I now have a place to do each of these. I’m looking forward to the finished bench, but probably not as much as you. Thanks for the post.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View CrossGrain (Josh)'s profile

CrossGrain (Josh)

64 posts in 1613 days


#6 posted 1032 days ago

Ha ha – nice!

-- Josh, Virginia , http://crossgrain.wordpress.com

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase