LumberJocks

Shopmade woodworking machinery #1: Shopmade oscillating spindle sander

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by corydoras posted 662 days ago 12055 reads 11 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch
no previous part Part 1 of Shopmade woodworking machinery series Part 2: Shopmade oscillating spindle sander: Testing »

Well, I have never blogged in my soon to be 40 yrs, so, I am stepping into new grounds here.
I have a couple of project posts here on LJ of homemade tools and such.
I am really into woodworking, and have been kind of since I was a kid.
No serious woodworking until the past 3-4 yrs.
but over the years i have made some furniture for nephews and nieses, and some for me.
Kribs, rocking horses, high chairs, entertainment centers shelves and so on.
Finally getting my own place and my own mancave in the basement, I started building my shop.
I have not posted any pictures yet, but it will come.

I did not pay enough attention to make the best out of the builds, when coming to square and tight fit, but after watching almost ever episode of NYWS, and every other available woodworking show, along with reading many magz, I am picking up a few tricks to getting better results.

I have always liked getting stuff to work out of other peoples trash, and my “throwing away stuff” muscle is poorly developed.
I happen to work as an automation electrician at at factory producing wall panels, and from scavanging dumpsters and so on, I alwas find something to bring home. We ofte dissmantle old machines, and I tend to drag home some stuff.
Enough of that.
What I am trying to say, I think I mabye more interested in building woodworking machinery than actually using these in real woodworking, but I hope to when my shop i complete.

This first part will be on building a OSS.
Sure this can be bought, although in Norway they are quite rear, and EXPENSIVE.
There are actually no really low end OSS on the market here, so Triton and JET are the only available, as far as I have found, but these are priced from 350-800 USD.

I may be a Yankee, but I actually hesitate buying this OSS, when I can have the enjoyment of building one.
Of course I could take a couple of hours overtime and buy a factory made one, but the I would loose the thrill to see if this is something that can be done, and produce a decent result.
If I dont succeed, well, than I am a couple of experiences richer.

Blogging about this build may not be the perfect thing but since this build is not done in a couple of evenings, I thought why not.

I have actiually done most of the building already, but I will post some pictures along with some comments, and see if there is any intrest in following this build out thre.

Have not made any sketchup drawings or made any decision on size yest, but I tend to build and develop as I go.

The thing i new i wanted was a 5” long spindle, and I wanted i sturdy, so the driveshaft was to be 20mm dia.
I know what you are thinking, this limits the possibility to run tiny diameter drums, and yes it does.

But i think I will be able to squeeze on a 24 mm drum.

The drums are homemade from 3/4” baltic birch plywood, stacked 7 in height, glued and trued and the centerbored in a lathe.

Double sided carpet tape on the drum an emery cloth abrasive in different grits are attached.
There is a slot in the drum to fit over a pin drilled into the shaft, ad the drum i secured with a bolt and washer on top.


A 550w motor is running this on a V-belt drive at a ratio 1:1. The motor is a 1450rpm

A second motor for the oscillation is a 9w geared motor producing about 100 strokes/min.
Stroke distance is 30mm

Linear guiding is an old guide from 80s german edgebanding machine dissmanteled at work, and the shafts are 40mm with ballbearing bushings


The ballbearing blocks for the drive shaft is made from solid oak.

There are some stop collars on the shaft also made from oak and tapped and threaded set screws in these.

The off center wheel and stroke rod for the vertical movement are also made from oak.

Motor mount and baseplate are 3/4” baltic birch with plastic laminate.

The machine cover are from the same material, and alu cornerprofiles, and an off market chineese stop/start switch

Top will be 30mm plastic laminated particle board with inserts to suit the diff dim drums.

Top size ended up 750mm x 480mm, so a decent size and good rest for the workpiece

Dust collection will be done through a 100mm port to the enclose underneath the spindle.
This is sealed with window weather stripping

The top has just been edgebanded tonight, and I hope I will get the top ready for assembly tomorrow.
Also need to make more drums of different sizes, and do the wiring of the motor.

As I have only single phase in my shop, i run 3 phase motors with capacitors, so the real effect is a fair amount lower than stated above.

But I have yet to stall the motor on a couple of tests today.

I will try shooting a video tomorrow.

End of part 1

Cory

-- ->Growing old is mandatory, Growing up is optional-<



13 comments so far

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

870 posts in 1889 days


#1 posted 662 days ago

Thanks for posting this. I’m not sure if I’ll ever get around to building one, but I do like looking at some of the ideas others come up with. I’ll be looking for part 2 and hoping it works well.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

109523 posts in 2082 days


#2 posted 662 days ago

Wow that’s some great engineering ,very cool.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

9578 posts in 1195 days


#3 posted 662 days ago

Very impressive design and workmanship but I’m thankful for Harbor Freight where these can be bought for $89 here as I don’t have the talent to construct one. You are doing a great job!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2154 days


#4 posted 662 days ago

very cool, and a very nice build!

the oscillating strokes seem quite fast at 100spm, do you find that this is a good speed?

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View corydoras's profile

corydoras

102 posts in 1002 days


#5 posted 662 days ago

Thanx for the compliments guys.Wish we had HF in Norway, I see a lot of stuff there that I could use, or modify to suit my needs.

I am not sure about the stroke freq. but I assume it will be no problem. it looks sensible, but i have not done massive testing.

-- ->Growing old is mandatory, Growing up is optional-<

View JarodMorris's profile

JarodMorris

165 posts in 881 days


#6 posted 624 days ago

Not sure about your HF, but the one by me has no Oscillating spindle sander for $89. The cheapest I see them go is $130. I’m taking a (not so) wild guess here and will say that this one is constructed better than the one from HF.

-- Dad: Someone was supposed to pick up his toys! Son: My name isn't "Someone".

View lolototo's profile

lolototo

2 posts in 563 days


#7 posted 563 days ago

Thank you it’s very nice work

and would you like please tell us more detail i need to build this machine but the photo lack explanations

please share the all individual parts separately and all steps to accumulate this machine

thanks in advanced

View corydoras's profile

corydoras

102 posts in 1002 days


#8 posted 562 days ago

Thank you lolototot.

As the machine is finished and in use, I really dont want to dissasemble it to take photos of each individual part.
All the photos I have is posted in this blogs 2 pages.

There is information about the parts in the text.
All the parts are salvaged parts and is not something that is comercially available in its identical form. i just took what i had laying around in my shop.

Here are some of the specs copied and pasted from the blog text:

1: The drums are homemade from 3/4” baltic birch plywood, stacked 7 in height, glued and trued and the centerbored in a lathe.

2: A 550w motor is running this on a V-belt drive at a ratio 1:1. The motor is a 1450rpm

3: A second motor for the oscillation is a 9w geared motor producing about 100 strokes/min.
Stroke distance is 30mm (I do not remember the gear ratio)

4: Linear guiding is an old guide from 80s german edgebanding machine dissmanteled at work, and the shafts are 40mm with ballbearing bushings

5: The ballbearing blocks for the drive shaft is made from solid oak (pillowblocks or flange blocks would be better, but as mentioned, I took what i had laying around)

6: Driveshaft is 20mm diameter

7: Motor mount and baseplate are 3/4” baltic birch with plastic laminate

8: The machine cover are from the same material, and alu cornerprofiles, and an off market chineese stop/start switch

9: Top will be 30mm plastic laminated particle board with inserts to suit the diff dim drums.

10: Dust collection is a 100mm port to the enclosure underneath the spindle.

Hope this helps.

But, I had now drawing or plan for this build. Just use whatever you can get your hands on, for free, or cheap.
if you are to by these parts you propably arebetter off buying a comercial one.

Best reg
C

-- ->Growing old is mandatory, Growing up is optional-<

View lolototo's profile

lolototo

2 posts in 563 days


#9 posted 562 days ago

thank you very much for your fast reply

but what about the mechanism of motors,how up and down movements occur with rounded motor in the same time
i think that there is a motor joint with (up and down) and anther motor just attached to make these to movements

please explain in more details this actions

and thank you again very much sir

View corydoras's profile

corydoras

102 posts in 1002 days


#10 posted 562 days ago

lolototo:
Check out this video, it shows both motors and the movements they make.
The stoke movement is only 30 mm, that is 15 above and below center of the pulleys in coplanar.
Hope this explains it for you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=8455lqKopLw#!

C

-- ->Growing old is mandatory, Growing up is optional-<

View kaerlighedsbamsen's profile

kaerlighedsbamsen

345 posts in 218 days


#11 posted 91 days ago

Just discovered your machines through youtube and now see that you are a member here as well. I think it is no shame at all liking to build/fix/tinker with machines rather than using them. Is’nt that part of what being a man is all about?
Great inspiration. Thank you for sharing!

-- "Do or Do not. There is no try." - Yoda

View Todd Swartwood's profile

Todd Swartwood

54 posts in 230 days


#12 posted 66 days ago

Well C,
I have been building cabinets and furniture since 1977 when I started in business for my self.
Now that I am retired and have a bigger shop than ever, I think I would rather build jigs and machines
to make woodworking more fun than actually using them. So I guess we are in the same boat.
I am a member of your you tube page, and have enjoyed watching you there. Glad to see you here
as well.
Todd

-- Todd Swartwood (Todd Swart-Woodworks)

View corydoras's profile

corydoras

102 posts in 1002 days


#13 posted 66 days ago

@kaerlighedsbamsen: You are correct, its called beeing a man:)
@todd628: I like your thinking:) We definately speak the same language, and I wish you luck on building jigs and machinery to fill up your shop. See you around, borth here and on YT

C

-- ->Growing old is mandatory, Growing up is optional-<

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase