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Rebuilding Quick Ratcheting Bar Clamps (Harbor Freight)

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Blog entry by Randolph Torres posted 12-03-2011 02:41 AM 1561 reads 1 time favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

3 Tools Required

1. Drift pin driver
2. Philips screwdriver (small)
3. Standard Screwdriver (small)

There are four ways they can fail:

1. Compression, Braking, Bar worn, Glue obstruction.

First on the dynamic end remove the drift pin, this will allow you to remove the compression assembly. After removing the compression assembly remove the five face plate screws, remove the face plate. Inside you will see 2 springs, and 2 dogs, one is the compression dog the thicker one, the other is the brake.

Trouble shooting—If the compression assembly is not moving 3/16~1/4 then remove the compression dog and rotate it 180 degrees axially not end for end (the penitration is not centered) Reassemble in reverse order.

— If the brake is not holding (what is gained from each compression is lost when the handle is released) remove the brake dog and rotate it 180 axially.

When reassembling push the release button while driving the bar through the compression assembly. You do not have to replace the drift pin unless you want to.

The bar can be reversed, but the end pin will have to be driven to stick out the opposite side. It fits into a slot on the fixed end.

These fixes will give another life to these clamps. PS Once in a while you will find that one of the dogs did not go through the hardening process correctly so the metal will be weak and wear out quickly. This can also be fixed with a round file and a torch reface the sharp grabing edge with the round file then heat treat the dog using a propane torch then quench the dog to harden the steel. CLAMP ON Woodworkers

-- another tip from cooperedpatterns



8 comments so far

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2429 days


#1 posted 12-04-2011 08:10 AM

thanks, I’ll try it.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2429 days


#2 posted 12-04-2011 08:11 AM

oil or water quench?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7950 posts in 2806 days


#3 posted 12-04-2011 08:18 AM

Good tips… hope I can remember this…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Randolph Torres's profile

Randolph Torres

295 posts in 2282 days


#4 posted 12-04-2011 08:14 PM

Mr. Survivor: you can use either the object is to freeze the the cristals then if you want you can reheat it then place it in sand to cool slowly annealing it.

-- another tip from cooperedpatterns

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2429 days


#5 posted 12-04-2011 08:17 PM

I thought there were 2 different steels, oil and water quench. There are some that it doesn’t matter?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Randolph Torres's profile

Randolph Torres

295 posts in 2282 days


#6 posted 12-05-2011 04:05 AM

I don’t understand 2 different steels. This is a mild carbon steel.

-- another tip from cooperedpatterns

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15090 posts in 2429 days


#7 posted 12-05-2011 05:33 AM

I think someone on here was explaining tool steel. That is where I got the idea.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Randolph Torres's profile

Randolph Torres

295 posts in 2282 days


#8 posted 12-06-2011 03:38 AM

There are many many types of steel I don’t think this is any exautic steel but I can tell its been heat treated and has a medium carbon content. I you see one of the dog with a arc it has been bent by the lever and it most likely missed the heat treatment at the factory it will also loose its sharp edge needed to grip the bar.

-- another tip from cooperedpatterns

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