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Complex Curve Veneered Box Series #3: Making the Inlay Lines

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Blog entry by Matt Nudi posted 12-08-2014 11:32 PM 1314 reads 0 times favorited 3 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 2: Making the box Carcass and veneering Part 3 of Complex Curve Veneered Box Series series no next part

So today was pretty fun. It ended up being a successful day at the shop making the inlay lines I was going to use. So for starters, I glued up using my vacuum press 4 sets of veneer sheets. The first 3 were black/white/black, and the last one was white/white/brown/white. The first is going to serve as the main inlay lines for the outside of the box, and the second will serve as the inlay lines for the inside of the lid and box opening. So here are all the sheets I was going to be cutting up.

The next thing to figure out was how in the world will I cut these. The table saw was the best choice, but I didn’t have a good way to secure the sheets. So I figured it would be easiest to do them all at the same time using some sort of fixture. This is what I came up with.

So it’s not much, but on the back side of the piece, I put a space board that the 3 screws go through that was the same thickness as the veneer layers. Then, the maple piece isn’t flat but rather is an arc, allowing for the force from the screws to be evenly distributed across the front and keeping the veneer flat and squeezed together entirely along the cutting surface. The general process that I’ll use is to cut for a little while, then reset the cross brace farther back, then keep cutting. I edged up one side on the belt sander, and then ripped the other to make sure everything is nice and square before proceeding.

So, the general cutting process was to put a piece of painters tape over the exposed edge, pictured on the edge on the left. I bumped the fence over the saw blade thickness plus some more for the thickness of the inlay strip.

And there you have it, a ton of little inlay strips ready to be used!

-- - Still a new guy to the craft, but always striving to learn more



3 comments so far

View grizzman's profile

grizzman

7798 posts in 2768 days


#1 posted 12-09-2014 12:08 AM

way to go matt, doing a project like this is so fun, especially when you’re learning a new way new techniques…keep having fun…

-- GRIZZMAN ...[''''']

View Julian's profile

Julian

1037 posts in 2155 days


#2 posted 12-09-2014 04:20 PM

You can also cut inlay strips without any waste by using a cutter/slitter with the veneer flat on a board. I saw this done by Steve Latta either on a DVD or on the web. Looking forward to seeing how you veneer your project.

-- Julian

View Matt Nudi's profile

Matt Nudi

121 posts in 1455 days


#3 posted 12-09-2014 05:53 PM



You can also cut inlay strips without any waste by using a cutter/slitter with the veneer flat on a board. I saw this done by Steve Latta either on a DVD or on the web. Looking forward to seeing how you veneer your project.

- Julian

If you want to check out my previous blog entry I have most of the veneering stuff on there. Although there is waste here, this is much much more time effective and accurate than cutting with a veneer saw for me, simply because this method cuts all 4 layers of inlay lines at once and I don’t have to worry if the veneer layers are perfectly flat since the screws clamp down on the layers and flatten them out. However for the rest of the project, I did cut everything with the veneer saw for the fine lines with almost no loss of thickness!

-- - Still a new guy to the craft, but always striving to learn more

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