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New Shop in the Raw #7: Unisaw Outfeed Table

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Blog entry by builtinbkyn posted 01-09-2016 01:59 AM 2202 reads 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 6: State of the Shop Part 2 Part 7 of New Shop in the Raw series Part 8: Making a Functional Workbench »

Started this a few days ago, but haven’t had much opportunity to be in the shop to get it finished. I ran into an issue of my own making. I saw it coming, but thought “Ah maybe it won’t happen.”

I used a piece of 3/4” AC for the bottom of the torsion box. It was a little warped but thought it would get pulled back when it was glued and screwed to the MDF that already had the center cells glued to it. Figured the 3/4” MDF with the grid was pretty rigid and the plywood would just conform. Well nope. Wasn’t happening. Put a bow in the top of about 1/8” or more at the center. I should have used another piece of MDF or a 1/2” sheet of finish grade ply, but I had the 3/4” AC and wanted to use it so it wasn’t hanging around the shop.

Now I was at a loss to try and figure out how to make this not a total loss. The 3/4” AC was glued and screwed and wasn’t coming off. It was either fix it or cut the whole thing up. Cutting slots across the plywood that went 2/3rds thru the board relieved most of the stress that caused the bow, but not 100%. The remainder was done by rabbeting the maple skirts to fit over the edge of the top. Had to router the edge of the MDF to accept the rabbet.

Well I lived and learned from my hasty laziness. Here’s some pics of the unfortunate event that just added more work to something that shouldn’t have been that much work :)

Finally got a chance to use my miter saw station for some fabrication.

I realized I forgot to buy some pipe so I could make longer clamps for glueing the edges to the darn thing. Had to jury rig it, but it actually worked pretty well.

Made a nice little purchase from CL the other night. Sold my 12” Ridgid miter saw to a soon to retire NYC cop who makes wood toys and stuff to sell at fairs and picked up this Shop Fox mortiser from a different cop for $170 including the set of Grizzly bits that have yet to be used. Think it was a good score. I’ll be using it to build my workbench, when ever that may be :)

Oh one more thing. Picked up some flat neodymium magnets to make a jig for setting the knives on the jointer. Bought extra and used one on the fence to hold up the lever. Works great! :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)



10 comments so far

View Reaperwoodworks's profile

Reaperwoodworks

94 posts in 395 days


#1 posted 01-09-2016 04:05 PM

You are going to love that mortiser! They are so great.

-- Website: www.reaperwoodworks.com, Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_ognomZyK6V0VwdokBcixw

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#2 posted 01-09-2016 11:02 PM

Thanks Reaper. I want build a beefy workbench so I can learn to use hand tools and need a rock solid surface for doing so. However I’m not sure I want to do all of the chiseling grunt work to get there LOL Who knows? Maybe I’ll give it a try, but I’ll have the mortiser as a backup :)

I installed the outfeed table today. I sanded it, but it still needs some work like easing/chamfering the edges and routing out miter slot extensions for a sled. Then it needs some protective finish. However it’s flat, rock solid and level with the Unisaw. Whoohoo! :)

I actually got to use the table for a little project for someone very special to me. I’ll post that as a little project later.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View bearkatwood's profile

bearkatwood

1195 posts in 472 days


#3 posted 01-10-2016 01:47 AM

C’mon man your killin’ me here. That place is too clean, make it dusty already!

-- Brian Noel

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#4 posted 01-12-2016 03:15 AM

Brian I take the pics after I’ve cleaned up. There’s one below with some dust LOL

Had a busy day, but did get a couple of hours in the shop. I cut some recesses in the top to receive maple strips for miter slot extensions. I started with the Dewalt 611 and a 1/2” bit which I proceeded to burn up. Wasn’t a good choice, but the Bosch 1617 was in the router table and I was lazy. Had to pull it out anyway since the 1/2” bit was shot. Went to a 3/4” with a 1/2” shank and made short work of the hardboard and MDF. I sanded everything flush, but ran out of time to do the miter slots. Had a Rangers/Bruins game to get to at the Garden. Ah there’s always tomorrow. ;)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#5 posted 01-13-2016 10:26 PM

A few more hours in the shop to route out the miter slots, apply finish and flush up the outfeed table up to the cast iron top. I had to hog out the back side of the outfeed table to fit over the angle iron on the rear of the saw top.

I think I’ll replace the Unisaw side table with a matching top to the outfeed table, but that’s for another day.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#6 posted 01-17-2016 05:58 AM

Short post on a long day. Had some time to make the matching extension wing after picking up the Jet 15” planer today :) The seller was a nice guy and had a really nice shop. Unfortunately he’s breaking it down for a move, but the shop was well outfitted and you could see he paid attention to detail in everything about the shop. Took three of us plus a solid 2×10 and about a minute to get it onto the bed of my truck.

Just needs another coat of finish and some wax so it matches the outfeed table.

And the new toy

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1045 days


#7 posted 03-07-2016 03:39 PM

Hello – I have enjoyed seeing and reading about all the great work going on with all your shop-build projects. I am in the same general mode, completing a shop build project. In my case, it is converting a two car garage to dedicated shop use. It began with adding insulated interior wall and ceiling surfaces, so it was a concrete-up conversion. I have taken about 25 months doing it so far. I expect another 2 or 3 to go. I have not done the great documentation of it all that you have, and have not been posting any news on this effort. My options to only do part time work on this project makes it painfully and embarrassingly slow. Someday I intend to provide a shop tour type post here, but it isn’t ready for that.

One of my projects was to construct a built-in cabinet style workbench. For the counter top, I used plywood supported by a 2×4’s. It is built, and very strong and I am very pleased with it. On top of the plywood, I added a layer of 3/16” hardboard (This sheet material is one that I have always called it “Masonite”, but that brand name is not associated with the sheet I bought form Home Depot.)

In your pictures you appear to have used a similar hardboard product for table tops, and you talk about finishing it. I can’t find it if you have given any details about how you finished that surface. I think you have applied a finish, and then waxed that surface.

My question, finally: What finish did you select to put on the hardboard surface?

(This came out to be a long-winded question, apologies to the readers…)

Jim
Houston TX

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#8 posted 03-07-2016 04:30 PM

Hey Jim. Thanks for reading and yes, sometimes things go slower than we hoped they would. I just experienced that in building the bench. Thought I’d knock it out in a week and it took several LOL

I finished the hardboard with a water-based floor finish which I had a gallon of left over from doing my floors at home. I thinned it quite a bit and applied multiple coats. I then applied some Johnson Paste Wax as a top coat.

Being a working surface, there’s not much more I’ll do to protect it. I expect it to get scratched, dinged and some spills of glue and finishes. However the wax has helped keep it somewhat free of the glues and finishes and they easily scrape off if I miss wiping them before they dry. If the tops need it down the road, I’ll sand them again and reapply the finish.

Looking forward to seeing the progress you’ve made in your shop.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

138 posts in 1045 days


#9 posted 03-07-2016 08:02 PM

Thanks. There are similar thoughts about the usage here, Bill. I added the hardboard as a smooth, sacrificial working surface, that can be cheaply replaced when it is too ugly to look at any longer. But i already have a few water stains on it, and got to thinking about how to coat it to retard such staining. I like the floor finish idea. Did you sand the smooth surface, or just apply that finish to it as it came from the manufacturer?

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

651 posts in 401 days


#10 posted 03-07-2016 08:13 PM

Just applied it to the factory finish. It soaked in pretty readily. I think I applied 4 coats. It was thinned by about a third. I lightly sanded between coats. The product is Basic Coatings Emulsion in satin.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn :)

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