LumberJocks

Solving the problem of a pesky pedestal

  • Advertise with us
Blog entry by builtinbkyn posted 08-11-2018 03:38 PM 571 reads 0 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I have this rather ugly pedestal that supports a glass top for the kitchen table. It came with the house. Not being ready to or having the time necessary to dedicate to building what I want, for now, I decided to fix a few issues with this one.

There’s a new floor in the kitchen. This beast of a pedestal, heavy and metal, doesn’t have a bottom. It sits on the edges of the folded metal which would not only scratch the new floors, when the floor is mopped, it leaves a rust ring. Not good all the way around.

So yesterday I made up a segmented base from some walnut. For something pretty simple in concept, it took a good part of the day to do, mostly because the walnut was rough cut, a little twisted and I don’t yet have my jointer/planer. It would be nice to enjoy doing a small project like this all by hand, but I have so much to accomplish, I just need to get things done.

I’d like to inset the pedestal into the base, but some of the sides of the octagon are off a bit. That would just take longer because of the dimensional inconsistencies in the pedestal. So I’ll make up some thin walnut trim to wrap it to connect the walnut base to the pedestal. Then I’ll nail in some glides and call it a day.

Here’s a bit of the work in progress. It needs to be glued, profiled and finished. Then the pedestal needs to be sprayed with a new color as the faux finish is chipped and doesn’t go with anything else in the kitchen.

I blew the dust off the PC biscuit jointer. Haven’t used it in over ten years. Kind of glad I had it though :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)



14 comments so far

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3170 posts in 2428 days


#1 posted 08-11-2018 04:24 PM

Bill, you mentioned that it was “rather ugly” and I thought, “How bad could it be?” Its worse. I am amazed that somebody actually designed and made that thing and then somebody else actually paid money for it. I know beauty is in the eye, but I’m thinking temporary blindness was involved here. It reminds me of a mutant alien octopus. I fear that you are stuck with it because probably the recyclers wouldn’t take it.

Have fun creating its replacement when it reaches the top of your “to do” list. :)

-- Art

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#2 posted 08-11-2018 04:34 PM

Yeah ugly was a pretty kind description lol

The glue-up was fun ;P

No matter how organized you think you have it or how organized you think you are, panic usually sets in after the first drop of glue hits the wood lol Now off to spray the ugly alien octopus :O

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#3 posted 08-11-2018 09:53 PM

Wooohooooo! After EIGHT LONG WEEKS the tile guy is 100% done, finished, complete and cleared out of here! They finished up today and cleaned up their mess which we battled over for, well, the last eight weeks. Happily he offered to pick up the bill for a professional cleaning service so I didn’t just have to take it out of the holdback I had on hand.

I don’t know how some people conduct their business the way they do. In the end the work is fine, but there were some bumps along the way that he needed to correct. They could have been averted and should have been. Not only did he have to rip up newly laid 2’x4’ porcelain tile, I can’t tell you how many times his guys cleaned the floor only to mess it up again the following day. Hours wasted. But he was here three times in eight weeks and let the job run itself. That’s all on him.

In the end, I can’t imagine how much this job cost him in profit. Very foolish way to do business. I estimated the job to take three weeks. I know, with the guys I had working for me, I could have done it in that time. Heck we did work like this in that timeframe. Unfortunately for me, those eight weeks felt like I was captive in my own home. Captive to the mess and captive to having people in the house every day. Man I need to drink and drink well lol

Well at least I was able to get things I wanted to do done in a timely manner. Ugly pedestal is drying. I put a coat of medium Danish oil on the walnut and made up some trim for it. I think I’m leaving well enough alone and not profiling the walnut base. The square stock goes with what’s going on with that pedestal anyway.

On to bigger and better things after a good meal and a few drinks :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View jbay's profile

jbay

2733 posts in 1070 days


#4 posted 08-11-2018 11:43 PM

Isn’t that going to raise the overall height of the table? (looks like about 1 1/2”) ??

I see a chair leg raise project in your future. lol

-- “Hanging onto resentment, is letting someone you despise live rent-free in your head.” (Ann Landers)......

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#5 posted 08-12-2018 02:35 AM


Isn t that going to raise the overall height of the table? (looks like about 1 1/2”) ??

I see a chair leg raise project in your future. lol

- jbay


J the final height was obviously something to consider when doing this. However the table will be +-30 5/8” with the glass top. The pedestal is 28 5/8” high without the walnut base. The base is 1 3/8” and the glass top is 5/8”. That would make a reasonable table height. A table height between 30” and 31” is pretty standard. There’s no way on God’s green Earth I’d make chairs for this table lol Never even entered my mind. But it will work for now.

Not sure where this pedestal came from or if it was repurposed from something else. My guess is it originally had a marble top of 1 1/2” or it had some other kind of base. The pedestal with an open base sitting on the raw edge of the steel doesn’t make sense to me.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View jbay's profile

jbay

2733 posts in 1070 days


#6 posted 08-12-2018 03:12 AM

Good deal, I was thinking it was 30” to start with. Like you say, 30 – 31,
although I don’t going over 30 1/2 unless it can’t be helped.

I think painting it a different color might help. white or maybe a brown. Depends on what other colors are in the room with it.

EDIT: Just went back and read that you’re going to repaint.

-- “Hanging onto resentment, is letting someone you despise live rent-free in your head.” (Ann Landers)......

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#7 posted 08-12-2018 04:14 AM



Good deal, I was thinking it was 30” to start with. Like you say, 30 – 31,
although I don t going over 30 1/2 unless it can t be helped.

I think painting it a different color might help. white or maybe a brown. Depends on what other colors are in the room with it.

EDIT: Just went back and read that you re going to repaint.

- jbay


Yeah I sprayed it with some DTM paint I used on some exterior architectural metals around the house.

You know I think the pedestal was originally oriented the other way – meaning the bottom was the top and vice versa. I’ve seen the design using that center member with the ball at the end. My memory tells me it was inverted where the ball was at the bottom.

Ah well I’ll live with the ugly table for now. I don’t have time to make one and I don’t want to spend time and money looking for one I will probably replace. Besides, it will be surrounded by chairs and mostly hidden lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4898 posts in 883 days


#8 posted 08-12-2018 12:48 PM

I see your enjoying your fine table yet looks like the best thing you ever did :<))
no comment on table base except you should recreate out of all walnut LOL

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2696 posts in 753 days


#9 posted 08-12-2018 02:11 PM

I don’t know how some people conduct their business the way they do

I know exactly what you mean, Bill. Nearly every contractor I’ve worked with (and there have been a bunch in my 1929 house) has done something like this that cost them or me money in the end.

The guy who built my basement bathroom, last day, post inspection, he dropped a hammer in the shower, cracking the basin. Cost me $100 to get it repaired. Had an aftermarket bidet installed on the toilet down there, and he plumber drilled into the pocket door while mounting the remote on the wall. I just plugged the holes in the door with dowels. My sweetie got a new furnace, and the guy who put in the filter box used too long of screws so the filter wouldn’t fit in. Took them two extra trips to fix that. And these are the good contractors.

Nice job on the base. It’ll get you by until you can build a nicer one.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#10 posted 08-12-2018 08:45 PM

Dave I’ve had dinner out every night for the last three weeks – basically when the tile guys finally got into the kitchen. Sometimes I was at a friends house and quite a bit at local restaurants – the majority of the time eating at the bar alone, though sometimes I was with friends. Understandably, no one wants to have a diner guest for three weeks straight or have dinner out for that duration of time. Anyway, I did get to meet people and often the discussion went to why I moved to “The Burgh” and so forth. The subject of the work also came up. I can’t remember one person being shocked by the story. Last night there was a guy having dinner next to me. He’s from AZ and runs a company that does retail commercial interiors. His main client is Barnes & Noble. He’s here doing some reno work down the road at the mall. He told me the same situation exists in AZ – a lack of qualified contractors. You say it’s the same in MN. Where are all the tradesmen? Maybe they’re only doing high end work, but I consider my job high end. Heck I’ve have countless trades thru here only to tell me they’re too busy. I think they’re just afraid they’re not capable of doing quality work.

Well as for my fugly table. It’s looking less fugly since the paint job. I’m just cutting and pinning the trim to the base. It looks ok and will do for now. Oh the final height with the 5/8” glass will be 30” plus 1/4” for the glides I applied to the bottom. ;p

Oh this is what it looked like in the kitchen prior to the floor replacement. You barely see it with the chairs around it :)

Polished, white porcelain tile was not for a single guy with a large German Shepherd that likes to run in the yard. I needed my own personal porter to mop it each morning. I think banks may have those, but not me lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#11 posted 08-12-2018 10:48 PM

I forgot I took this pic. I bet this pedestal was oriented the other way and had a piece of plywood inserted in it with ceramic tile or a piece of marble as the finish. I know I’ve seen this ugly thing somewhere. Maybe it was originally a plant stand outside a catering hall lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2696 posts in 753 days


#12 posted 08-13-2018 12:35 AM

Where are all the tradesmen? Maybe they’re only doing high end work, but I consider my job high end. Heck I’ve have countless trades thru here only to tell me they’re too busy. I think they’re just afraid they’re not capable of doing quality work.

I had two contractors I was very happy with. One closed up his business here in MN and moved to CA to take care of his ailing father. The other closed up his (successful, but not wildly so) shop, and became a foreman with one of the really big companies here in town. He spends about half as many hours on the job now, building conference rooms for lawyers and doctors, and has time and money to do small projects for fun.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2650 posts in 1111 days


#13 posted 08-13-2018 03:51 AM


Where are all the tradesmen? Maybe they’re only doing high end work, but I consider my job high end. Heck I’ve have countless trades thru here only to tell me they’re too busy. I think they’re just afraid they’re not capable of doing quality work.

I had two contractors I was very happy with. One closed up his business here in MN and moved to CA to take care of his ailing father. The other closed up his (successful, but not wildly so) shop, and became a foreman with one of the really big companies here in town. He spends about half as many hours on the job now, building conference rooms for lawyers and doctors, and has time and money to do small projects for fun.

- Dave Polaschek


Dave I think all the good contractors are busy building and outfitting high end bunkers for the elite lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View steliart's profile

steliart

2822 posts in 2859 days


#14 posted 08-13-2018 08:39 AM

Well I also find this leg design over killed … more is less … personally I would have try to use just 4 or even 3 of those, but I guess is too late now and that’s just me and the way I think

-- Stelios L.A. Stavrinides: - I am not so rich to buy cheap tools, but... necessity is the mother of inventions !!!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com