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New Home Workshop #17: An Improvement and a Necessity

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Blog entry by builtinbkyn posted 03-30-2018 12:21 AM 810 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 16: This Is What Was Supposed To Be About Part 17 of New Home Workshop series no next part

Today I added compressed air to the shop. I purchased the two outlet RapidAir Master Kit and installed it. It was as straightforward as it gets. One outlet is located near the compressor which is next to the DC in the other room. I’ll use that one to air clean the filter on the DC. The second supplies the ReelWorks hose reel which will service the shop. Right now and for the foreseeable future, I’ll be using the 5.5gal California Air Tools compressor I already own. One day I may upgrade to either a larger compressor or add a reserve tank to this.

I have to say, I’m really impressed with the ReelWorks hose reel. The hose is supple and compliant, unlike some I looked at. So it makes it more user friendly with pin nailers and palm sanders. It also has a detailed exploded parts view on the instructions. The reel is serviceable, unlike others. I had another reel in the shop in Brooklyn and the spring went wonky and never retracted properly. I had to add a hand wheel to use to retract the hose. It wasn’t serviceable with no replacement parts available from the mfg.

The necessity was making something I should have a long time ago – a cart for holding/moving/transporting the two 10’ slabs of honeylocust I picked up for my dining table. I’ve been struggling with moving them around while working on the shop. Not fun. But making this cart was quite a bit of fun. I used some small casters I had laying around. Works like a charm. I put some eyelets on the outriggers so I can lash the slabs down and to the cart, but the clamps are probably a better option.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)



7 comments so far

View BB1's profile

BB1

1211 posts in 1045 days


#1 posted 03-31-2018 02:19 AM

That cart looks like a great problem solver.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2653 posts in 1138 days


#2 posted 03-31-2018 02:51 AM



That cart looks like a great problem solver.

- BB1


Thanks Barbara. It’s really a back saver :) Not sure why I didn’t think of doing this sooner.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View BB1's profile

BB1

1211 posts in 1045 days


#3 posted 03-31-2018 03:15 AM

Do you have the table design all planned out? Looks like some nice slabs, I haven’t worked with honey locust.

That cart looks like a great problem solver.

- BB1

Thanks Barbara. It s really a back saver :) Not sure why I didn t think of doing this sooner.

- builtinbkyn


View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2653 posts in 1138 days


#4 posted 03-31-2018 03:20 AM

Not fully. I know it will be flat and smooth, but that’s about it lol I do have a few ideas. Just have to commit to one :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View BB1's profile

BB1

1211 posts in 1045 days


#5 posted 03-31-2018 01:20 PM

Should be a fun (although big) project. Maybe a matching food/water stand for Willie too? :)


Not fully. I know it will be flat and smooth, but that s about it lol I do have a few ideas. Just have to commit to one :)

- builtinbkyn


View IndyM3Scott's profile

IndyM3Scott

6 posts in 299 days


#6 posted 03-31-2018 10:00 PM

I’m always AMAZED by the stuff that you just “whip out in an afternoon” – most of those projects end up taking me days or weeks and they never look as nice as yours…

Two questions:
1. did you add any kind of condensate trap or do you just drain the compressor tank occasionally? I just finished re-plumbing my compressed air – I have a large 5HP compressor in the garage and two smaller two stage compressors in the basement that i use for various things, but I had never really done it “right”, so when I started to re-route something and realized I had a lot of condensate, I re-did the whole system. Put the compressor in the next room and ran about 30’ to my main drop with the condensate trap and pressure regulator installed and then back up overhead to distribute through multiple drops around the shop and up and out to the garage and attic. The thinking was that the 30’ between the compressor and the initial/main drop would give enough distance to let the air warm up and condense any water out of it before it got to the condensate trap/regulator and that was at the lowest point in the system, but haven’t really done enough with it to prove all that out yet… I couldn’t really see any condensate trap in your system so wasn’t sure how you were addressing that topic.

2. I also had my dust collection planned to go in that same room where I moved the smaller compressor – kind of next to the shop but out of it for noise and space considerations. But then the more research I did, the less I wanted it near the shop or even inside the house… The really dangerous particles that are too small to see are the hardest to capture and they get sucked throughout the house, so I’d about decided to build a little lean-to cabinet on the side wall of the basement and move the dust collection outside where the really dangerous stuff can dissipate away. How in-depth did you review before locating yours as you did? Because it would be nice and easy to just plumb it in where it is rather than build the cabinet outside, but the materials I was reading had really scared me off of keeping it inside.

Thanks for any input… You have some awesome projects, as usual!!

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2653 posts in 1138 days


#7 posted 04-01-2018 02:36 AM



Should be a fun (although big) project. Maybe a matching food/water stand for Willie too? :)

Not fully. I know it will be flat and smooth, but that s about it lol I do have a few ideas. Just have to commit to one :)

- builtinbkyn

- BB1

Barbara, I’ll make something for Wille too ;)


I m always AMAZED by the stuff that you just “whip out in an afternoon” – most of those projects end up taking me days or weeks and they never look as nice as yours…

Two questions:
1. did you add any kind of condensate trap or do you just drain the compressor tank occasionally? I just finished re-plumbing my compressed air – I have a large 5HP compressor in the garage and two smaller two stage compressors in the basement that i use for various things, but I had never really done it “right”, so when I started to re-route something and realized I had a lot of condensate, I re-did the whole system. Put the compressor in the next room and ran about 30 to my main drop with the condensate trap and pressure regulator installed and then back up overhead to distribute through multiple drops around the shop and up and out to the garage and attic. The thinking was that the 30 between the compressor and the initial/main drop would give enough distance to let the air warm up and condense any water out of it before it got to the condensate trap/regulator and that was at the lowest point in the system, but haven t really done enough with it to prove all that out yet… I couldn t really see any condensate trap in your system so wasn t sure how you were addressing that topic.

2. I also had my dust collection planned to go in that same room where I moved the smaller compressor – kind of next to the shop but out of it for noise and space considerations. But then the more research I did, the less I wanted it near the shop or even inside the house… The really dangerous particles that are too small to see are the hardest to capture and they get sucked throughout the house, so I d about decided to build a little lean-to cabinet on the side wall of the basement and move the dust collection outside where the really dangerous stuff can dissipate away. How in-depth did you review before locating yours as you did? Because it would be nice and easy to just plumb it in where it is rather than build the cabinet outside, but the materials I was reading had really scared me off of keeping it inside.

Thanks for any input… You have some awesome projects, as usual!!

- IndyM3Scott

Thanks Indy. I try and give it my best effort. But sometimes it doesn’t work out the way I envisioned ;) And with so much on my plate, I don’t have time to think. I just have to do and hope for the best lol

I didn’t plan out the air for the shop in much detail. For now and until I replace the compressor, I’ll just drain down the system from the tank valve. However the Rapidair components make it easy to make changes.

Locating the DC outside isn’t really an option for me because of the logistics of the shop’s location. Below grade on three sides and the fourth being a courtyard/driveway that would be impacted negatively by the DC. I know I should probably be more concerned with the ill effects of the dust created by woodworking, but I do my best to mitigate it in the usual manner. Fortunately the shop’s HVAC is detached and separate from that of the rest of the house. I also created an airlock of sorts. I placed a second partition between the door leading up to the main part of the house and the shop. Hopefully that’s enough. I haven’t noticed any accumulation of dust in the house from the work I’ve done so far.

But that’s again. Keep me posted on what you decide to do with the DC and make a blog about it. I’d be interested in seeing the progress.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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