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New Home Workshop #14: Stepping Back and Taking Stock

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Blog entry by builtinbkyn posted 03-20-2018 01:36 PM 784 reads 0 times favorited 30 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 13: Duck!!!! Duct!! Part 14 of New Home Workshop series Part 15: Things Falling into Place »

Sometimes I need to step back from something to re-evaluate and readjust my approach when I feel things aren’t moving in the right direction or going as they should. Yesterday, I decided to rethink how I wanted to mount the ducts as the provided strapping really wasn’t working for me. The conditions above the ceiling aren’t favorable to begin with and the strapping, though it can be used to suspend the pipe, is better for strapping the pipe directly to a surface. Using it as a method to suspend the pipe below the ceiling, was creating some issues – namely not providing lateral support that would allow me to push the male end of one pipe into the female end of the other. With another set of hands, that would work. But doing this solo, well it was a futile effort.

So I headed out to HD and picked up some lengths of 3/8” threaded rod, couplings and mounting plates. This proved to be a much better approach. I used the strapping to make a bracket and then used pop rivets to fix that to the pipe. This made all the difference in the world. The threaded rod provides enough lateral support to resist movement when pushing the pipes together. This will also allow me to land the support where needed. I completed one section of pipe and took the rest of the day off lol This is how I will proceed to complete the remainder of this horrendous project. Thankfully that was also the last long section of 7” pipe. The remainder is reduced to 6” and 5” pipe.

Looking back I see I unknowingly chose the worst option in terms of duct pipe. I should have either bitten the bullet and went with the much more expensive option of using the quick-connect pipe or used the cheaper 24Ga. pipe that is more easily manipulated, cut to size and pieced together. My other option in hindsight, would have been to hire some pros to do this. I would already be up and running :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)



30 comments so far

View Dave Polaschek's profile

Dave Polaschek

2274 posts in 634 days


#1 posted 03-20-2018 02:01 PM

It’s looking good, Bill. The work now will pay off in future years enjoyment.

-- Dave - Minneapolis

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

3093 posts in 2309 days


#2 posted 03-20-2018 02:53 PM

Bill, who is Willie’s pal?

-- Art

View Arif DALKIRAN's profile

Arif DALKIRAN

118 posts in 153 days


#3 posted 03-20-2018 04:08 PM

it is very beautiful

-- Arif Dalkıran, Marmara sea, Buyukada, Istanbul, Turkiye, https://arifdalkiran.com/

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#4 posted 03-20-2018 04:50 PM



It’s looking good, Bill. The work now will pay off in future years enjoyment.

- Dave Polaschek


Thanks Dave. I’ll just look back on this part as a bad memory lol


Bill, who is Willie s pal?

- AandCstyle


Art, that’s Buster. Trust me, his name is appropriate. He’s a rescue. He lived outside of a deli in Brooklyn until the local cat rescue nabbed him. I was originally supposed to foster him, but he got attached to me ;) I have another cat – Missy. She was a ferrel from the yards between the the row houses where I lived in Brooklyn. There are lots of them.

She came into the yard one day looking all beat up. She’s small and only weighs about 5lbs and has what I learned is a “tipped ear” – the vet clips the tip of one ear so the rescue can tell from a distance that particular cat has already been caught and released – I had no idea at the time about this. I just thought she lost part of it in a fight. So after getting her to a vet and discovering she was a capture and release and had her shots, etc – the rescues trap them, get them neutered and shots and then release them again – I gave her a home. She’s not really a lap cat if you know what I mean lol And she can make the most blood-curtiling noise you ever heard, when she gets annoyed. But the three of them are ok together – usually ;P


it is very beautiful

- adali

Thank you Arif.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#5 posted 03-20-2018 09:08 PM

OK so no one could pay me enough to do this job and I’m sure no one would want to pay me to do it :O They either couldn’t afford to pay me the time it would take me, want to wait for the time it would take me or I couldn’t afford to do it because of the time it would take me to get the job done lol

I think back to jobs where all the trades were working. The tin knockers (I know they hate that term, but that’s what they’re known as on the job) were always hated – not individually of course, but as a trade on a job site. When they hit the job, you could hear a collective moan. To begin with, “They’re $#!& is always getting in the way.” Now of course their $#!& was an essential part of any construction project. It made the space environmentally livable/usable, but electricians, plumbers and pretty much everyone else moaned and groaned because a run of duct got there before they did with their service. I always told those guys, too bad. Work around it, which of course they hated hearing. The tin men were also “hated” because they came in with a ton of “stuff” and were gone in what seemed like a flash in terms of the length of the overall job. Huge boxes full of tin would litter the job, and then suddenly, they were gone.

I have gained new respect for what the tin men do and how they do it, making it look seamless and easy when it’s not that at all. Maybe, as in any trade, it does become easier, but it’s certainly not easy. Working from sometimes vague shop drawings and when spaces aren’t fully defined, is an X-factor that needs to be appreciated. So anyone that does this for a living, you have my sincerest appreciation. Now get over here and finish this up for me lol

OK so I’m moving slow. But better that than getting everything in place only to realize I made the pipe too short, which almost happened lol

Picked up some brackets to use as hangers. These work much better than using the strapping.

Finding my line.

Hanging (not myself lol) pipe.

Oh we were having a little Spring this morning, but now it’s snowing :(

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4096 posts in 764 days


#6 posted 03-20-2018 09:28 PM

i am graduate of ABC Trade school for sheet metal mechanic …i could tell you some stories Bill :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#7 posted 03-20-2018 10:04 PM



i am graduate of ABC Trade school for sheet metal mechanic …i could tell you some stories Bill :<))

- GR8HUNTER


Now you tell me? lol Man I’d still have my hair if you came here to take care of this for me. I promise I never would have utter the words tin knocker lol

Hey how about some tips? Should I have used some kind of lubricant on my pipes? Now keep it PG please lol

I bet you have some to tell. You guys are usually trying to pack ten pounds of baloney into a five pound sack and upsetting everyone in the process. And that’s not your fault. Blame the architect lol Well you have my fullest respect. I hate doing this :O

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4096 posts in 764 days


#8 posted 03-20-2018 11:01 PM

have you tried to crimp the ends Bill ?

1 time on a job first time i pulled prints it said bottom of duct shall be no lower then 9foot 10inch and the bottom of purlins were set at 9foot 11inch LMAO :<))
MADE ME HAPPY was scale work at a school

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#9 posted 03-20-2018 11:14 PM



have you tried to crimp the ends Bill ?

- GR8HUNTER

Is that what that funny looking pair of pliers is for? lol Yeah they’re crimped. I don’t have a crimping/beading machine like you guys have. This 26ga. stuff is tough to work with especially when you’re not use to working with it. Ah but it’s all good and almost done. I do wish I chose the quick connect pipe, but my wallet is glad I didn’t.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

4096 posts in 764 days


#10 posted 03-20-2018 11:23 PM

i think it looks real good …and yes 5 blade pliers thingy :<)) think they also use them on spouting

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#11 posted 03-21-2018 01:56 AM



i think it looks real good …and yes 5 blade pliers thingy :<)) think they also use them on spouting

- GR8HUNTER


Thanks Tony. I’ma a tryin’ :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View BB1's profile

BB1

1152 posts in 900 days


#12 posted 03-21-2018 02:31 AM

And now my shop vacuum and Dust Deputy seem to not be enough in comparison! I’ll not be jealous though, looks like you are going to have a great setup.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#13 posted 03-21-2018 03:39 AM



And now my shop vacuum and Dust Deputy seem to not be enough in comparison! I ll not be jealous though, looks like you are going to have a great setup.

- BB1


Thanks BB :)

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

5570 posts in 1190 days


#14 posted 03-21-2018 01:45 PM

Looking good Bill! As a machinist-turned-engineer, I can appreciate the view of an architect-turned-tin-knocker ;-) Seeing the same space from both sides of the fence can be invaluable…

I feel your pain with the weather… spent all weekend outside enjoying spring :-) Woke up this morning to this..

:-(

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2504 posts in 992 days


#15 posted 03-21-2018 02:08 PM

Kenny, I worked in the field before going back to school for my degree. So I was always aware of the space requirements for ME rooms and other services. Heading back into the field as a site architect/project manager, I was always annoyed by seeing the space allotted by designers for equipment. I can’t remember a time when there weren’t issues related to this. Architects/designers look at cut sheets and specs, but fail to understand the space necessary for hook-up, service of and the ancillary components that make up a system.

We’re having a bit of Winter :(

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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