LumberJocks

my attempt at a Maloof style rocker

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Blog entry by Paul posted 01-15-2011 07:14 AM 2398 reads 6 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch

We all love this rocker and so I though I’d have a go at one.
My wife and I have a house with a nice size porch and so we went out and bought these cute to be assembled rocking chairs to sit on out there. They are the most uncomfortable chairs I have ever sat on in my life. After 15 minutes in them I have to get up and move around to get the blood moving again. They look nice from the street and accent the front of the house but that’s about it. With the shop calendar clear, I have decided now is the time for me to try and make one. I had posted in here for advise on who’s tutorial of the Maloof to use and I received many good responses and they mostly directed me to three different ones. I though that I would order order a video from all three and then after seeing the videos decide who’s take on this chair I would build.
Just by chance and for no other reasoning, I ordered Charles Brock’s first. I have watched the video two times completely and read his directional book which is part of the package. After seeing the video I see that there are many tools that I will need to buy to get though this chair. I spent a few hundred dollars on tools and so have decided to build this chair before purchasing any other video. This video is good and the book is nicely done as well. This is not to say that I won’t build someone else’s chair next but right now I’m eager to get started. I will say that I like very much what Hal Taylor has done with the back of the chair, making it flexible. His chair might be the next one.
My woodworking experience is minimal at best. If you check out my projects you will see that I have not been working with wood for years. With three kids and a small business I have to make ( and sometimes sneak) time to work in the garage. This project will take a while.

Here we go….........!

I went to the lumber yard and purchased walnut.
I paid about 8 dollars a B/F. I don’t know the market so I am not sure if I paid good or not.
after jointing and plaining I finished just shy of 1 and 15/16. The directions suggest not being less than 1 13/16 so I’m good there.
I still have to finish cut the length. The seat can be a straight panel seat or a few angle cuts on the boards and the seat is coopered. Either way, the seat will have to be grinded to the liking. I”m going to cooper at the recommended 3 deg. I will be using biscuits to reinforce the seat.



27 comments so far

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3100 posts in 1686 days


#1 posted 01-15-2011 07:55 AM

Attempting Sam’s rocker has always been in my mind.
I will certainly be watching your progress with great interest.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1509 posts in 1445 days


#2 posted 01-15-2011 09:04 AM

Wow that is some thick walnut.. I love the look

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View Tim Dahn's profile

Tim Dahn

1481 posts in 2317 days


#3 posted 01-15-2011 01:00 PM

You can’t go wrong with any one of the three chairs you were considering, should be fun to follow along,

-- Good judgement comes from experience and experience comes from poor judgement.

View GerryMurray's profile

GerryMurray

22 posts in 1445 days


#4 posted 01-15-2011 02:58 PM

I too, want to build a Maloof style chair, Have been waiting to pull the trigger! Hal Taylor, has my eye at this point!I love what he has done with the back supports!
Good Luck! Enjoy!

View sras's profile

sras

3946 posts in 1881 days


#5 posted 01-15-2011 03:54 PM

Looking forward to your story!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View MShort's profile

MShort

1732 posts in 2170 days


#6 posted 01-15-2011 04:49 PM

I too am looking forward to seeing the build in progress on this one. I have this project on my wish list of to do’s as well. Good Luck on your project.

-- Mike, Missouri --- “A positive life can not happen with a negative mind.” ---

View Paul's profile

Paul

217 posts in 2204 days


#7 posted 01-15-2011 08:24 PM

Today the whole house is sick with fever except for me. Not much time for the garage.
I’m waiting on some tools so there’s not much I can do for the front legs until they arrive.
I used 3M spray adhesive to glue down the plan onto the particle board for the side profile template of the rear leg. There is a notation on the plans to be sure the two contact points for the seat and for the arm rest are parallel. considering the orientation of the photos These two points are facing the bottom. The easiest way for me to do this was to line the most outer spot with the edge of the particle board. then I used the table saw to shave the board to the most outer line. Then I cut through the wast and crept up on the second line with the table saw using the fence again. This ensures the two lines are parallel referencing off the fence. The rest will be trimmed on the band saw and then sanded.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1803 days


#8 posted 01-16-2011 04:46 AM

This is on my list of things to attempt this year, although it might have to wait until next year.

So, I will have to live vicariously through your blog.

I wouldn’t mind eventually doing all 3-chairs: Hal Taylor, Scott Morrison, and Charles Brock. I’d also reaaly like to take the class that Charles Neil and Randy Child will be holding, especially since Randy has templates that were given to him personally by Sam Maloof.

Did you buy about 40-BF of walnut?

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Paul's profile

Paul

217 posts in 2204 days


#9 posted 01-18-2011 03:42 AM

I was able to get some garage time this weekend while the family was sleeping. I cut the seat boards down to 20 wide. I made an error and cut too much off of board 2 and 4 during trimming and after my cuts I was short 1 1/4. Rather than remake those two I remade 3 the center board. I made it wider to make up the difference.
I cut the plans and used 3M spray adhesive to attach the seat section to a piece of non corrugated board. That template will help you mark the center of the seat, the beginning of the pommel, the outline of the carving area, the arches at the front of the seat, and the spindles. All those markings are on the seat as well as the marks for the biscuits. I will be using #20 biscuits to reinforce the seat. There is a 2 1/2×3 cut on each corner of the back to receive the rear legs. There is a 1 3/4 dado to receive the front legs. I’m waiting on a rabbiting bit which will go over those two different cuts to make tenons out of them. In my garage the band saw is just kind of there. It’s a 16 delta that was given to me. I honestly never used it for a wood projects. I hardly use it for anything. The guy who gave it to me is a metal guy and not a wood worker. I traced the profile of the rear legs on to rough stock and cut them on the band saw.I had a hard time cutting through 2” stock with that saw. The garage was full of smoke from smoking wood. After a little research I believe the speed on the saw is spinning the blade too slow and probably not the right blade. I want to Grainger today and bought another pulley and and belt. It now spins faster. They didn’t have any blades in stock so I ordered some wood blades in different widths and teeth per inch so I can use the saw better.
The profiles of the rear legs are roughed out and have to be routed to the template. I’m waiting on that bit also. That bit is a 2” spiral flush trim bit.
I only squared out stock for the front legs. Once the tenons are completed on the seat the mortises on those legs can be cut and rounded over to slip right on to the seat.
The seat is sculpted through scraping and grinding to achieve the desired contour. Charles Brock actually takes a bunch of stock out with the band saw before the glue up. He does this to boards 2,3 and 4.
By my next post the four legs should be fitted to the seat and some of the sculpting started.
From the one photo it doesn’t look like there’s been a lot done but I have been over and over the book and video to get to this point. I’m trying to get though this with out any expensive or timely mistakes.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1803 days


#10 posted 01-18-2011 03:50 AM

Definitely sounds like you should put a new blade on the bandsaw, at the least.

What did you order for blades?

Glad to hear you were able to get a bit of time to make some progress here!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1803 days


#11 posted 01-18-2011 03:54 AM

Definitely sounds like you should put a new blade on the bandsaw, at the least.

What did you order for blades?

Glad to hear you were able to get a bit of time to make some progress here!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Paul's profile

Paul

217 posts in 2204 days


#12 posted 01-18-2011 05:15 AM

I ordered a 1/4” 6TPI 1/8 14 TPI and 3/16 4TPI skip tooth. I’m sure each has it’s purpose. I’ll play with each and see what does what best.
And always open to suggestions or advise here..

View lanwater's profile

lanwater

3100 posts in 1686 days


#13 posted 01-18-2011 08:58 AM

It looks like it is shaping up.

I can’t wait to see the seat carved up.

-- Abbas, Castro Valley, CA

View Paul's profile

Paul

217 posts in 2204 days


#14 posted 01-27-2011 08:51 PM

I had some time this week and here’s what I was able to get done:
I received some deliveries and that helped me go further. Can’t work with out the tools.band saw blades arrived and I put on a 6TPI blade and it cuts this wood real easy.
The biscuits came and so I glued up the seat. The instructions actually directs you to cut some of the bulk away in the seat before gluing but I only cut a little around the pummel. First time around I want to take it slow. I don’t want to cut something away that I might not want removed. I’ll carve the seat away with the grinder. I try to understand everything thoroughly before going forward. I watch the video on each segment about 10 times….. More than once I have fallen asleep watching the video..
The router bits also arrived and so in the first photo you can see the areas routed out for the legs to be received.

I cut the front legs and cut an extra one. I found a local guy who will turn them for me and we decided that an extra leg would be a good idea for trial. It worked out good because I got to try the joint before making the two final legs.

Here are a few photos of the leg joined with the seat. Notice how nicely the leg sits to the seat. In the photo the leg is just placed , no hardware or clamp.

The directions also call for removing some of the bulk before turning the front legs. I did this on the test leg and will do the other two later. If you look closely at the pine leg you will see just outside of the dados there are scratch markings. Those markings are created when the leg is set in place and then take an awl and scratch at the seat line. When removing the bulk with the band saw I am to stay above those lines and then later when shaping, the remaining wood is feathered in to the seat.

I have routed out the rear legs from the template. I still have to remove some bulk from them and then prep them for the joint. This involves gluing a backer board to the joint area and then cutting it at 6 degrees which gives you the classic narrow at the back look.

I know you’all are waiting for the shaping of the seat….....Soon

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1803 days


#15 posted 01-27-2011 08:59 PM

You’ve made some really good progress since your last post! It’s all starting to take shape now… keep it coming!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

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