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Why I like Vintage Tools #8: The Finished Scroll Saw

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Blog entry by brianinpa posted 11-16-2008 11:43 PM 8629 reads 1 time favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 7: A work in progress. Part 8 of Why I like Vintage Tools series Part 9: Dunlap Belt/Disk Sander »

Two weeks worth of work standing behind the wire brush, shaking and spraying paint, and it is now useable. It’s not completely finished yet, but it is close enough to it.

The only things left to do are repainting the logo plate, finding or making a cap for the pump tube, and remake the model number plate.

I also need to get the right size belt to fit properly (I think I am going with the link belt), but I put one on to make sure it works and it cuts fine.

The motor is an old Wagner Electric ¼ hp motor that a little bit of work to fit this application, but I think it adds to the appearance of this vintage saw.

When I made my sister in-laws music stand, I went out and bought a new Craftsman scroll saw. I was cutting ¼” oak and the saw was being overworked the entire time. Today I was cutting some ¾” pine without any hesitation. I have a slightly used scroll saw for sale: anyone interested?

When I was all finished for the day, I had to move the saw off of my table saw and onto my work bench. This saw now requires two people to lift it. The next project will probably be a mobile stand to mount it on.

It has come a long way in a short time.

Thanks for reading and I hope you see that just becasue it is old and dirty, doesn’t mean it can’t be cleaned up and used for another 60 years. I am really liking this gold and black color scheme.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.



20 comments so far

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4438 posts in 2709 days


#1 posted 11-17-2008 12:43 AM

A great job, Brian. It looks like it works as well as it ever did. Sure makes those plactic marvels look sad.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View SteveKorz's profile

SteveKorz

2131 posts in 2461 days


#2 posted 11-17-2008 01:45 AM

Fantastic! I really like that gold and black. Nice restore…

I love making old, run down things new again. Great job on this.

-- As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another. (Proverbs 27:17) †

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1810 posts in 2470 days


#3 posted 11-17-2008 01:47 AM

“Sure makes those plactic marvels look sad.”

Thanks Thos., my thoughts exactly.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View Gary's profile

Gary

42 posts in 2225 days


#4 posted 11-17-2008 01:55 AM

I love the old saw. I have one, a sears and roebuck, that I got off ebay for 99 cents because no one wanted the poor thing. I stuck a power cord on it and it worked, so I will be cleaning it up and have some pics soon.

-- Gary, Missouri

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1810 posts in 2470 days


#5 posted 11-17-2008 02:03 AM

Steve,

The colors match by Craftman 100 table saw, and after I restored my plane, I knew I was restoring all my Craftsman tools to this color.

Gary,

I look at how much I have spent for this saw – $10.00, and almost all my tools ($40.00 is the most I have spent), and wonder why people give this stuff away.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View blackcherry's profile

blackcherry

3201 posts in 2570 days


#6 posted 11-17-2008 02:24 AM

Vintage glory nice fine nice work…Blkcherry

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1810 posts in 2470 days


#7 posted 11-17-2008 02:35 AM

Thanks Blccherry.

A guy I went to school with has a car shop that deals with mostly old chevys. He calls it Old Gold. That’s how I look at these tools.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View Bureaucrat's profile

Bureaucrat

18329 posts in 2399 days


#8 posted 11-17-2008 04:20 AM

Thanks for reading and I hope you see that just becasue it is old and dirty, doesn’t mean it can’t be cleaned up and used for another 60 years.

I believe this statement applies to more than just tools! Maybe some woodworkers too!

-- Gary

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1810 posts in 2470 days


#9 posted 11-17-2008 04:22 AM

At 40 plus I am beginning to think the same way about myself. I think I clean up pretty well, but my wife would probably argue with me about that.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1011 posts in 2233 days


#10 posted 11-17-2008 05:02 AM

I love old woodworking machines and the people who restore them. Nice job. The old machines are so honest. No gizmos, or worthless add-ons. I’ve been buying some older (but not vintage, yet) equipment off CL. Half the fun is cleaning them up and restoring the missing parts.

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View Bob42's profile

Bob42

455 posts in 2537 days


#11 posted 11-17-2008 02:29 PM

That came out great!

Nothing like an old tool.

It looks like you put on a new dust cover, I have the same saw and would like to know if you made it or was able to purchase it and if so , where?

-- Bob K. East Northport, NY

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1810 posts in 2470 days


#12 posted 11-17-2008 02:38 PM

Dave – Thanks and you are so right! No frills on this one, and it is 10 times better than the one I bought new.

Bob – I had to break out the sewing machine and figure out how to make a dust boot. For now this one will do, but I want to make one our of canvass rather than one of my wife’s sheets. She didn’t like it when she tried to use the sheet and saw a big chunck missing from the corner.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View marcb's profile

marcb

762 posts in 2420 days


#13 posted 11-19-2008 05:21 AM

Very nice, I still have to finish the jointer I received before I jump into my scroll saws. I bought a pair of them earlier this fall and need to get at least 1 done for my friend for XMas

Mine are both King-Seely models as well, though the motor doesn’t mount to the casting.

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1810 posts in 2470 days


#14 posted 11-19-2008 05:30 AM

marcb,
Thanks! I really like the King-Seeley lines and how they work. I guess an added benifit is that they don’t break. Every one of Craftsman tools are older than I am, I only wish I was running as smooth as they are. One problem you might experience is that if you restore one tool, then you will want to restore the other and then you will have to buy some more…
Good Luck.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View ratchet's profile

ratchet

1304 posts in 2534 days


#15 posted 05-22-2009 07:08 PM

Nice job! I’m amazed at your wrok. Did you use any eletrolytic rust removal techniques?

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