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At the Lathe #1: Urchin Shell Ornaments

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Blog entry by Brian Havens posted 12-12-2011 07:32 AM 2203 reads 8 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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I found figuring out how to make these ornaments quite a fun challenge.

(I already posted this video in my projects, but apparently that does not get it onto the LumberJocks Video Page)

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/57125#comment-1116565

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com



10 comments so far

View hairy's profile

hairy

2109 posts in 2284 days


#1 posted 12-12-2011 03:51 PM

Thanks for the great video. That’s among the best out there.

-- in the confusion, I mighta grabbed the gold ...

View Sanity's profile

Sanity

169 posts in 1442 days


#2 posted 12-12-2011 04:20 PM

Another great video, Brian. For additional inspiration you may want to take a look at the finials that Cindy Drozda turns.

-- Stuart

View Brett's profile

Brett

895 posts in 1511 days


#3 posted 12-15-2011 06:55 AM

Great project and very informative. Thank you for your inspiration with this video. Keep up the good work.

-- Hand Crafted by Brett Peterson John 3:16 http://www.TheCrookedNail.blogspot.com

View stevebuk's profile

stevebuk

57 posts in 1436 days


#4 posted 12-15-2011 01:31 PM

very informative, thank you..

View Donna Menke's profile

Donna Menke

576 posts in 3018 days


#5 posted 12-15-2011 08:49 PM

Very well done video. Great info about shopping around for the shells. Plexiglas and acetone was a new idea for a finish for me. How do you apply it? How much plexiglass to how much acetone?
Great drawings too- how did you do that? I am a draftsman and enjoy using pencils, but this computer graphis has interested me since I failed at leaning AutoCad back in the late 80s.
Your sliding mortise solution is nothing less than genius- I’m gonna have to make you my next buddy. I can learn a lot from you. The mortises don’t have to be in a dowel. It would be easier for me to make a hole in a square section length of wood and then trim it to an octagon. Drilling into the end of a dowels would not be my cup of tea.
Drilling the hole for the eye hook before turning the top. I never would have thought of that. Super.
This was very much appreciated, Brian. you done good. Donna

-- "So much wood. . .so little time!" www.woodworks-by-donna.com

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1857 days


#6 posted 12-15-2011 10:29 PM

Thanks everyone!

Sanity: Yes, Cindy Drozda’s work is indeed fantastic. In fact I have a have some completed lidded boxes that I have yet to post, some with finials for which I took my cue from looking at Cindy’s work.

Donna: I like the octagon idea. It may add to the idea of being able to repair an ornament if the shell breaks. After cutting the mortise in half, perhaps it would be easier to soften the CA glue with some acetone and remove the old mortise. A hexagon would be easier to grip the old mortise (perhaps even with a wrench) and remove.

I applied the plexiglass much the same way that turner’s apply CA glue finish, by wetting a cloth and touching it to the pen while it spins at a fairly slow speeds. I found applying it well to be a difficult task, which is partly why I do not use it any more.

The correct plexiglass to acetone mix is somewhat of a guessing game. For the solution I used on the shells, I filled a 1 pint mason jar about 1/4 full of broken plexiglass and filled with acetone. After about two days, the plexiglass will be dissolved and the solution will have a constancy similar to a light oil. I poured about 1/4 of that solution into a new 1 pint mason jar and filled the rest with acetone for a thin solution. My goal was to have enough plexiglass to harden, but not so thick that I got a film build.

I used Google Sketchup for the pictures. In this video I used only still pictures exported from Sketchup and used a fade transition, but in other videos, I have also exported whole animations as movies, and re-editied it with the other video clips. Best part: Sketchup is free.

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View Donna Menke's profile

Donna Menke

576 posts in 3018 days


#7 posted 12-16-2011 02:24 AM

Thanks for the careful explanations, Brian. I know that Sketchup must not be too difficult, but my computer skills are limited at best. I like my pencils and erasers. I have used some Ubuntu for coloring a drawing I did for a logo. It works a champ- much better at getting even color coverage. I edit my videos and burn copies of them, but this graphics stuff just doesn’t work for me. I’m glad you do it so well- looks fantastic.

-- "So much wood. . .so little time!" www.woodworks-by-donna.com

View slotman's profile

slotman

105 posts in 1208 days


#8 posted 12-17-2011 02:53 PM

Great video, great work, very informative & now I’m signing up for a class with Ashley Harwood.

-- Roger

View Brian Havens's profile

Brian Havens

194 posts in 1857 days


#9 posted 12-17-2011 11:50 PM

slotman: Lucky you. I have not met Ashley, but from what I can tell, I expect that she is an excellent teacher.

-- Brian Havens, Woodworker http://brianhavens.com

View slotman's profile

slotman

105 posts in 1208 days


#10 posted 12-20-2011 09:51 PM

I talked to her earlier today. She sounds like she knows her stuff & I’m set up for class in January. Only 2 hr drive for me to Charleston.

-- Roger

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