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aftermarket miter miter guage

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Blog entry by Bob #2 posted 09-16-2007 09:46 PM 880 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s my take on an econo miter guage.
There’s quite a few out there and many costing a lot more than this one but this does the job for me so far.
If you feel you need a new miter guage as well this may not be the rignt one for you.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner



6 comments so far

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Robb

660 posts in 3396 days


#1 posted 09-17-2007 12:10 AM

Thanks for sharing, Bob. I haven’t upgraded my stock miter gauge yet, so I appreciate your thoughts on this one. You’re right about not necessarily needing to get the most expensive one; it’s easy to get caught up in thinking you have to spend a fortune to get something that will be functional.

-- Robb

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3483 days


#2 posted 09-17-2007 12:16 AM

Hi Robb: I have always believed in ”critical mass” as a function of wood working.
By this I mean , you must have all the tools necessary to produce a project.
The second phase should be upgrading the first stage. <g>
There is much to be learned by starting out humbly.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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Tony

978 posts in 3492 days


#3 posted 09-17-2007 11:20 AM

Thanks for the post -

I do not use the most expensive Miter Gauge either – but I do use the Osborne
EB-3 Miter Guide. It is not the most expensive, but I find it exteemly stong, acciurate and more importantly repeatable cuts. At just over a $100 – I wonder if its worth buying all the materials to make one – apart from the fun and experience.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3483 days


#4 posted 09-17-2007 01:43 PM

Hi Tony:
I can see some similarities between the Osborne guide and this one.
That follower riding the miter slot has me fascinated.
What happens when you get a wide board that reaches the edge of your table saw?
The video showed several cuts for miters shich seem dependant on the stop guide for accuracy rther than the triangle effect.
Still and all a good looking system.
Is is difficult to store?

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 3492 days


#5 posted 09-17-2007 11:45 PM

Hi Bob

If I have to cross cut very long boards, then I use a Miter/Chop or Radial Arm Saw, If I have to cut panels, I use a Panel jig or a Circular saw. I have used the Osborn for the full 42” without problems, I just find it easier to use another saw for long boards (especially heavy wood such as Oak and Maple)

What I like about the Osborne is the use of the bar for setting the angle. Not only does it add stability to keeping the angle, it also gives some rigity to the gague. (triangle are remarkably strong).

The stop guide only adjusts the length of cut – I used the Osborne for making the Latice boards – any errors with so many joints definitely show up.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

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Bob #2

3809 posts in 3483 days


#6 posted 09-18-2007 12:54 AM

Tony, you and I work a lot alike.
I recognized that Osborne set up being superior to most guides in that it makes the guide rigid where the others depend on the miter slot for stability.
I use a crosscut sled on my table saw for most short straight cuts and to be truthful, I have not needed a mitered cut of any extent since I did my office in tongue and groove clear cedar. Even then I used the miter saw (CMS) with extensions.
Cheers

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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