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Making a few tools for the wood lathe #5: Finishing the handles and mounting the blades

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Blog entry by Bob #2 posted 09-11-2007 06:28 PM 2077 reads 0 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 4: Making up the handles Part 5 of Making a few tools for the wood lathe series no next part

Once the first handle is finished I cut it free from the stock and re center the tailstock on the remaining blank.
I will now refine the handle shape except for the part in the jaws and fit the ferrule.
p.s. The tool mark BEDAN is actually a bead scraper – my bad . A bedan only has one side sharpened.
handle 8
Once the ferrule is fitted, I wrap electrical tape around it about 4 times and remount the handle the other way around to finish the back end. I generally use a small skew to sneak up on the tail stock point then finish the remaining coat of lacquer over the entire handle. I use lacquer becausee it seems the most durable for this stuff and doesn’t warm up in use and get sticky.
handle-9
handle-10
I will let everything dry for 24 hours then fit the shank of the tool on by placing the blade in my vise and tapping the handle home with a rubber mallet.
Here are the two tools finished except for some epoxy resin in the spacing left from drilling the handles.
handle10
As the need presents I will quite often make up a tool in a hurry promising myself to remake it “cosmetically” in the future but that never seems to happen.

Here’s a few that I have made for various tasks:
handle-11
The top two are the ones just made and the others are scrapers and similar.
The bottom one is a file contoured to produce a continous shape on a bowl I was developing.
The one with the round shaft in the middle I used for cutting an ironwood box. I brazed on a carbide tip on that one.
Just to finish this segment, I grabbed a piece of Manitoba Maple (Box elder), fresh cut and mounted it on the lathe to try the skew/gouge.
handle-12
Mountains of long curly ribbons of beautiful smelling wood shavings. I love turning this wood green!
Next I grabbed the new skew gouge and it works well to make continous beads with the advantage of being able to top the beads with the same tool.
I must try it on dry wood to see how it planes the surface.
It wanted to take too much off on this wet stuff.
My bead technique needs some practice as the beads I made in my excitment look more like mushrooms!
handle-13

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner



9 comments so far

View David's profile

David

1970 posts in 2890 days


#1 posted 09-11-2007 06:36 PM

Bob -

Excellent tutorial, beautiful photos and wonerful work. I think you have inspired us to investigate making our own tools. Yours handles are furniture grade works of art!

David

-- http://foldingrule.blogspot.com

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2782 days


#2 posted 09-11-2007 07:04 PM

Excelent insite to making your own tools. I have made some handle for some existing tools, but I cannot find any material at the moment for the ferrules – maybe I will have to go with 1” copper water pipe.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2773 days


#3 posted 09-11-2007 07:39 PM

Thanks fellas:
I enjoy this part of the hobby so a little metal work is fun for me as well as flat wood work.
Dave: Once you get the basics, grinder hand grinder and some kind of hacksaw the opporunities are limitless.
As the price of tools today one needs a bit of a buffer.

Toni:
I got those ferrules at Lee Valley and I keep an assortment in my shop.
I see them also in Craft supplies in the U.K. www.craft-supplies.co.uk
Copper pipe will work just as well but you have to be careful with it as it has no taper on it and can give you extra work fitting.

Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3051 days


#4 posted 09-11-2007 08:17 PM

Great blog Bob, I finally took some time to go through your series.
It brought back some memories of a general metals class I had in high school 60 years ago. I made a cold chisel, & center punch. Also a hunting knife. We used an oven for hardening, but used a torch for the tempering. You’d hold a flame to it, & and watch the colors, & when straw color was at the edge, we’d quench it in oil. You can see the colors when grinding a drill bit , or chisel if you let it overheat. when the color changes to blue, no more temper.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2912 days


#5 posted 09-11-2007 08:18 PM

ah… wow!

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2773 days


#6 posted 09-11-2007 08:25 PM

Dick:
That’s how I learned to heat treat metal too.
I have done dozens of tools over the years that way.
I made my first hunting knife from a bastard file as a kid in the north.
I must have spent 2 weeks cutting the darn thing up to make the tang and upper gullet.
We pretty much made everything in those days. (no, Not the good old days) <g>
I found out quickly that if you wanted special tools in this lathe hobby you need a couple of jobs or some forging skills. <g.
Bob

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Bob Babcock's profile

Bob Babcock

1804 posts in 2838 days


#7 posted 09-11-2007 08:34 PM

Great stuff Bob. Beautifully done. My list of things to try keeps getting longer and longer.

-- Bob, Carver Massachusetts, Sawdust Maker http://www.capecodbaychallenge.org

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 3051 days


#8 posted 09-11-2007 08:35 PM

My Son has my hunting knife down in Arkansas. I’ll see if he can take a picture of it, & send it to me.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2788 days


#9 posted 09-12-2007 11:45 AM

Great, Bob! I missed this one as it breezed on by the latest blogs while I was at work. Excellent!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

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