LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'zebrawood'

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View Jace McDaniel's profile

ATTN OKLAHOMA WOODWORKERS!!

05-10-2017 02:49 PM by Jace McDaniel | 0 comments »

So I noticed after looking on Facebook that there were no woodworking guilds in Oklahoma that I could fine so I’ve made a Facebook page titled woodworkers Guild of Oklahoma basically just because a lot of other states have a guild and my hopes are to build some networking and make some relationships with some other woodworkers locally because to be quite honest I don’t have but one friend who is a woodworker and he can’t do anything right now because of a personal injury. ...

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View Jace McDaniel's profile

NETWORK AND EXPAND! #1: NETWORKING IN OUR COMMUNITY*MUST READ*

04-24-2017 11:43 AM by Jace McDaniel | 0 comments »

Hey guys i just thought I’d talk about the importance of networking with each other in the woodworking/maker community. Social media is a HUGE platform to show your work and meet other woodworkers all over the world( i think we all know this) but i just wanted to share my usernames for my platforms in hopes you guys could give me a follow and ill return the favor. Its all about growth and i have a dream of making this my way of living and you wouldn’t know how much it would help m...

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View Madmark2's profile

100 foot cabinet shop #2: Accuracy, accuracy, accuracy . . .

02-13-2017 04:23 AM by Madmark2 | 5 comments »

Wood has three dimensions and the table saw cuts both X (length) and Y (width) The Z (thickness) axis needs a lunch box planer. The table saw has the Incra rip fence and miter gauge so X and Y are covered. Z however needed some help getting the same accuracy as the saw. One of the benifits of digital gauges is that I can see the reading without squinting or having to bend down. I have a digital height gauge to set the saw height and set the router bits consistently. Repeatability is...

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View Madmark2's profile

100 foot cabinet shop #1: Thoughts behind the shop and working standards

02-13-2017 01:50 AM by Madmark2 | 3 comments »

Used to have a shop, X got in the divorce. :( Fast forward 15 years & I have 2/3 of 1/2 of a garage to build a cabinet shop in. The core of any shop is the table saw and within my (retired) spending limit I got a brand new Grizzly G0715P. Simultaneously with the saw purchase I added an Incra LS-III rip fence and an Incra miter gauge. I’m disabled and can’t walk / stand a lot so everything is within reach of my chair in front of the saw. I’ve got most all of th...

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View Ron Stewart's profile

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #4: Final Steps: Top Trim, Shelf, and Finish

12-28-2016 11:17 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

Top Trim The top assembly “sandwich” is trimmed by 1/8” thick poplar slats that rest on the outer edges of the leg tenons. This trim and the legs form what is a metal frame on the original table. I cut the trim from the same board I used for the legs. I attached it much like a trim carpenter installs base or crown moulding. I temporarily placed the top backer/triangles subassembly on the base, used a miter saw to cut the first piece (nibbling away until it was exactly ...

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View Ron Stewart's profile

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #3: Legs

12-28-2016 10:31 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

The table’s legs are tall and thin, with a diamond shaped cross section. The outward-facing edges are beveled to 120 degrees to match the angles of the top hexagon’s vertex angles. After puzzling over how to cut those angles, I found a simple solution: make each leg from two triangular prisms, each with a right-triangular cross section. Then I could cut each leg half with a single 30 degree rip on the table saw. I was able to cut all of the leg parts from a 3.5” wide x 0....

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View Ron Stewart's profile

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #2: The Top Assembly

12-28-2016 06:49 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

The top assembly is a three-layer sandwich approximately 1 1/8” thick. The bottom layer is 1/2” thick MDF hexagon. I had never cut a hexagon before, so I searched the web and found the excellent article Cutting Hexagons on a Table Saw by Don Snyder (a fellow LumberJock who goes by StLouisWoodworker) to use as a starting point. The large size of my hexagon (23 3/4” across the flats) made it difficult to follow the article to the letter, but I did the best I could. The ...

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View Ron Stewart's profile

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #1: Introduction

12-28-2016 04:22 PM by Ron Stewart | 2 comments »

This series of blog posts outlines some of the construction details of my Hexagonal Cocktail Table project. As I mentioned in the project description, this table is a reproduction of a commercially available table. The original has a metal frame and legs. My table is all wood and MDF, and attaching the slender legs to the relatively thin table top proved to be quite a challenge. I’ll cover that more in a later post. Earlier this year, I retired from my position as a software engin...

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View RyanT's profile

Cremation Urn

10-09-2016 05:16 AM by RyanT | 2 comments »

Good evening fellow lumber jocks,this is my first blog. i have posted a few projects and have looked at almost every single project on here (there is a lot) just to get some inspiration/ideas of what i could make. I think about 3 years ago now i stumbled upon a video posted by the Wood Whisperer, i was hooked at that point and wanted to buy every tool i could think of right off the bat (just ask my wife :)). In these last 3 years i have learnt alot more than i thought i could (learn from your...

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View MadMark's profile

Pipe Making #1: Introduction

05-18-2016 04:03 PM by MadMark | 2 comments »

This is a first draft of what should become a nice illustrated tutorial on making a pair of one piece pipes. The pipe making process is much more complicated and needs a lot of tools to make. Pipe making requires: Table saw Drill press (several bits) Band saw 4” Stationary Belt sander Oscillating Spindle Sander 1” belt sander 8” disc sander ROS sanding @ 120 & 240 Hand sand with sanding sponge At this point the pipe is ready for finishing. ...

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