LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'veneer'

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Thick Veneer from France...and other places #6: Gold in the Garden

04-15-2017 01:02 AM by shipwright | 25 comments »

For the past few months I have been tracking down members of the Barberry family (Berberidaceae) for its amazing yellow wood. One member (Berberis vulgaris I think) was the material used for the yellow flowers in classic French marquetry.Anyway, last fall I was able to get a few small pieces of Agarita (Mahonia trifoliolata) from LJ Jerry (nubsnstubs) in Tucson and I used it in the marquetry I did over the winter. It was an amazing colour and just to top it off, it was luminescent under black...

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Exposed Finger Joint Box #1: Intro (The Body)

02-21-2017 07:20 PM by splintergroup | 5 comments »

I’ve had several inquiries for plans or more info into the details of my exposed finger joint boxes I’ve been building of late. Plans get complex and are often best explained in some detail, hence this project blog. Lots of pictures and details, hopefully clear and not too boring 8^) A set of dimensional drawings (4 pfd files) can be downloaded here It’s next to impossible for drawings like these to contain all the details. These boxes have simple structure, but a l...

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View Ron Stewart's profile

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #4: Final Steps: Top Trim, Shelf, and Finish

12-28-2016 11:17 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

Top Trim The top assembly “sandwich” is trimmed by 1/8” thick poplar slats that rest on the outer edges of the leg tenons. This trim and the legs form what is a metal frame on the original table. I cut the trim from the same board I used for the legs. I attached it much like a trim carpenter installs base or crown moulding. I temporarily placed the top backer/triangles subassembly on the base, used a miter saw to cut the first piece (nibbling away until it was exactly ...

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Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #3: Legs

12-28-2016 10:31 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

The table’s legs are tall and thin, with a diamond shaped cross section. The outward-facing edges are beveled to 120 degrees to match the angles of the top hexagon’s vertex angles. After puzzling over how to cut those angles, I found a simple solution: make each leg from two triangular prisms, each with a right-triangular cross section. Then I could cut each leg half with a single 30 degree rip on the table saw. I was able to cut all of the leg parts from a 3.5” wide x 0....

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Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #2: The Top Assembly

12-28-2016 06:49 PM by Ron Stewart | 0 comments »

The top assembly is a three-layer sandwich approximately 1 1/8” thick. The bottom layer is 1/2” thick MDF hexagon. I had never cut a hexagon before, so I searched the web and found the excellent article Cutting Hexagons on a Table Saw by Don Snyder (a fellow LumberJock who goes by StLouisWoodworker) to use as a starting point. The large size of my hexagon (23 3/4” across the flats) made it difficult to follow the article to the letter, but I did the best I could. The ...

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View Ron Stewart's profile

Building the Hexagonal Cocktail Table #1: Introduction

12-28-2016 04:22 PM by Ron Stewart | 2 comments »

This series of blog posts outlines some of the construction details of my Hexagonal Cocktail Table project. As I mentioned in the project description, this table is a reproduction of a commercially available table. The original has a metal frame and legs. My table is all wood and MDF, and attaching the slender legs to the relatively thin table top proved to be quite a challenge. I’ll cover that more in a later post. Earlier this year, I retired from my position as a software engin...

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View Lazyman's profile

Hot Hide Glue Experimentation #2: First Project with Hot Hide Glue

11-08-2016 03:03 PM by Lazyman | 2 comments »

So after getting setup with a hot plate and an antique glue pot, I decide to try making an entire project with HHG. The reason that I decided to explore HHG in the first place was to use it to apply some veneer to a shadow box mirror frame so I decide to use it for the assemply as well. The shadow box will be square (40”x40”) about 4” deep with a 31” round mirror. I decided to use some 1/2” plywood instead of 3/4 to keep the weight down. The back is recessed ...

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View DonSol's profile

Basketweave Box w/Roses #2: Part 3 Using the window method

10-10-2016 12:34 AM by DonSol | 5 comments »

In the following drawing the book “The Marquetry Manual” by William A. Lincoln tells you the window method is done by starting with the farthest piece in the background. This would be #1 in the top drawing. Instead of following the lines in the drawing drawing when you come to an adjoining piece you over cut (dotted lines) into the adjoining piece. Put glue all the way around it, with a tooth pic, I put my glue in aplastic coffee can lid. Wait for the glue to dry then draw or t...

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View shipwright's profile

Marquetry School #9: Prepping for Piece by Piece Course

08-20-2016 01:14 AM by shipwright | 5 comments »

Fall classes are rolling around in a few weeks and there’s something new. I now have students who have enough experience to benefit from a piece by piece class and two will be taking advantage this September. This means that I have to prepare a palette of colours, grain patterns, and species of veneer in packets of four for them to design their pieces around.Today, I selected and cut thirty-five packets complete with backers (no front “wasters” on piece by piece packets). To...

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Thick Veneer from France...and other places #5: Ever Seen $500 Worth of Cow Bones?

04-26-2016 01:26 AM by shipwright | 20 comments »

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Well this one is more like half a thousand dollars. Yes, by the time you convert euros to Canadian dollars and pay the shipping from France that is about how it works out. You may not think this is a very good haul of cow bones for the price but in fact the two bundles in the middle were thrown in free with my order so in fact it could be worse. Actually I am very happy with my new purchase and can’t wait to use some of this material. ...

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