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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'trestle table'

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Trestle Table #15: Flatten Table Top

09-29-2016 03:17 AM by HappyHowie | 0 comments »

It has been about a week since I glued my cherry hardwood table top together. As you might remember if you have followed my blog, I also make clamping cauls that I used during the top glue up. Even though I used these cambered cauls I still had some ridges at the jointed edges. I intended to use only my #6 bench plane and my #4 smoother to flatten both sides of my table top. I began that process and quickly wished that I owned a low angle jack plane. I was tempted. What I did do was to ...

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Trestle Table #10: Tested Plunge Router JIG

09-16-2016 03:39 AM by HappyHowie | 4 comments »

I finally tested the plunge router mortising JIGs I made yesterday. I will need much more experience in using the router to make mortises. I used my digital caliper to measure the depths I was getting. For some reason the depth settings was not reliable, as yet. Went I route my mortises in the trestle table’s leg assemblies I will check the depths I have cut with the calipers. I am still not decided whether I will square the routed mortises or round the tenons.

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Trestle Table #8: Glue-up Trestle Table Top

09-11-2016 01:15 AM by HappyHowie | 0 comments »

I performed a full dry glue-up test for this table top. This test included the clamping cauls I made. It became obvious that a 7 or 7 1/2 length bolt would have been ideal, or use of more washer. Instead I broke out my tap and die set to add more 5/16”-18 threads to each bolt. Once the bolts were ready I did a full dry fit. I trimmed the length of the two long boards on my table saw. I jointed the edges of each board so I would get dead-on flat panles; I alternate the su...

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Trestle Table #6: Complete Cambered Cauls

09-04-2016 10:29 PM by HappyHowie | 2 comments »

After using my planer yesterday to cut the cambered ends, I drilled holes two inches in from the ends of each caul. I selected a 3/8” drill bit in order to easily fit the 5/16 diameter bolts I purchased yesterday. Besides laying the bolt on my bench and testing the thickness of a 5/16” and a 3/8” drill bit along side the bolt, I also drilled a test hole in a scrap board. I selected my 3/8 inch drill bit for my cambered cauls. After marking a line two inches in from ...

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Trestle Table #5: Cambered Cauls

09-04-2016 01:55 AM by HappyHowie | 2 comments »

In order to make sure the table top I will be gluing will be flat and so I can keep the thickness I have milled to separate board, I am making cambered cauls for clamping. I want the boards to retain their milled thickness of 13/16 inches so I can cut curved edges to the table top. I read somewhere during my research that softwood lumber is okay for clamping cauls. I bought three 2 by 12 by 8 feet redwood planks today at Lowes. I selected the planks that where very straight. Also most ...

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Trestle Table #4: Mechanic Duties

09-02-2016 07:33 PM by HappyHowie | 2 comments »

If a woodworker is going to have electrical and mechanical equipment in his shop he should also acquire the skills to setup and repair those machines, or keep a mechanic handy. They won’t be cheap unless they are sons or brothers. I have both who are very skilled. I have tried to have them teach me what I need to know. If they have done tasks like wire in a panel or box then I attempt to copy their work. I heard my planer yesterday begin to make a loud racket. This morning I found t...

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Trestle Table #3: Milled and Cut Leg Assembly Parts to Final Dimensions

09-02-2016 04:15 AM by HappyHowie | 0 comments »

Today I took the 6/4 lumber parts that I had initially milled to rough dimensions so I could finish the milling process by cutting them to final lengths and widths. I left approximately a 1/16” in their widths from the table saw cuts so I could use my bench planes to remove the blade burns and saw marks. I also smoothly removed the surface’s planer marks from all flat surfaces. For the two batten parts that call for 5/8” thick timber I chose to resaw the 1 inch thick boa...

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Trestle Table #2: Finished Milling my Lumber Today

09-01-2016 02:46 AM by HappyHowie | 5 comments »

Today I continued working on my 4/4 lumber parts by running the boards through my 15 inch thickness planer. I selected the boards I will use for the top. By selecting them now I made sure they were milled to the same thickness through my planer. One board needed further planing that the other four so they ended up becoming 13/16th inches thick instead of 7/8 thick. I wanted the top as thick as I could get from my 4/4 rough sawn timber. I am happy with what i got. A board I had in my lu...

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Trestle Table #1: Milling 6/4 Rough Sawn Lumber Parts

08-27-2016 11:38 PM by HappyHowie | 0 comments »

After several days of study and analysis, I decided I would make a trestle table for my granddaughter Torrence. It boiled down between this relatively small trestle table or a shaker style writing desk with two drawers under the table top. Each would be approximately the same size of about 60 inches long and 30 inches wide. Frankly, the decision really came down to my desire to make a beautiful trestle table; one with great curves and shapes. Actually this trestle table’s top will...

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Leg and support joinery

04-21-2016 04:29 PM by Tooch | 2 comments »

After fixing the holes in the legs, it was time to square up the top supports and begin on the large motise and tenon joints on the underbracing. I started by finding the center of the supports and measuring out from there: After that, I carefully marked out what needed to be removed: I used a combination of a 3/8” mortise bit (for the corners), a 2” forstener bit (for the large middle section), and a hand chisel to clean up everything else. A dado bit on th...

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