LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'tool'

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Shop Tools #2: Work Sharp - The Wood Tool Sharpener Review

05-27-2007 01:34 AM by WayneC | 43 comments »

I have been looking for a sharpener for a while and came close to coughing up $250 for the Jet clone of the Tormak when the woodworking show was in town last month. I had also seen the Work Sharp on the web. Dan Like had seen one in action and given it his endorsement. There is a video of it on thier web site if your interested in seeing it in action. Wood Magazine has a review of it as well as a video of it in action. Two weeks ago when I was on my way home from the bay area I stopped ...

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Shop Tools #10: DeWalt 925 Radial Arm Saw

10-23-2007 05:43 AM by WayneC | 29 comments »

I have been resisting buying a Radial Arm Saw (RAS) for at least the last year. I have a great Sliding Compound Miter Saw, Router, and Table Saw. The only operation that seemed to be quick with a RAS that I could not easily do with the tools I have is making cross cuts using a dado set. Last week Blake posted a project where he did a wonderful job restoring a 1959 DeWalt Radial Arm Saw. I really loved the job he did. Sunday afternoon I was browsing Craigslist and saw an ad for a saw si...

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Handplane Reference #4: Web Resources

04-08-2007 04:34 AM by WayneC | 36 comments »

This is a list of links that I will maintain that are related to handplanes. This is primarily intended for my own use, but feel free to add to the list if you have some favorites. Manufactures Anderson Planes – Handmade Infill style planes Brese Plane – Handmade planes by Ron Brese. Also has blades for making planes. Classic planes – Infill plane manufacture Galoot Tools – High Quality Handcrafted Plane Blades and Chisels. Holtey – Infill...

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View mafe's profile

Low angel shoulder plane DIY (Div style plane) #1: Making the body part one.

05-24-2011 11:23 AM by mafe | 48 comments »

Low angel shoulder planeBecause it’s fun…. Before you start reading I want to tell that I finally managed to make it run!It was giving me a headache, but once I found out the problem it was right on. Here is a video showing it in action. But I will blog a improved version also in this blog serie. Not so long ago I followed a class here on LJ with Stefang where we build a bucket, part of this project was to make a convex hand plane (Krenov style). So what have this...

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Handplane Restoration #15: Stanley Bedrock #605 Jack Plane

05-07-2007 04:14 AM by WayneC | 7 comments »

Today was a day with a lot chores to be done, so I picked a plane to rework that required little effort. This is a Stanley Bedrock plane from the mid-1930s. Bedrock planes are Stanley’s preimum line of handplanes. They were made in sizes from #2-#8. All of the planes are numbered in the 600 series (e.g. 603, 606, etc.) The early planes had a rounded side similar to normal Stanley Bailey planes. In the early 1900s the planes changed to a more square side as you can see from the ph...

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Handplane Restoration #23: Stanley Bedrock 603 Type 6

10-11-2007 02:32 AM by WayneC | 18 comments »

I really like the Stanley Bedrock style planes and on a whim bid on and won this plane last week. I will be replacing my current #3 with this plane in my bench plane set. If you have followed the blog, I set a goal of putting together a full set of Stanley bench planes. The set is now pretty much complete with a little tuning planned. For example, I would like to replace my Sargent #8 with a Stanley 8C or perhaps a Bedrock 608 and have been slowly looking for one. Also, I still need to r...

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Handplane Restoration #14: Stanley Bailey #5 1/4 Junior Jack Plane

05-04-2007 06:41 AM by WayneC | 16 comments »

Another long week at work, so I will post another of the planes that is in good shape. This plane is a Stanley Bailey 5 1/4 Junior Jack Plane. I purchased this plane on ebay and it arrived in the mail today. It came with it’s original box and is in good shape. This is another plane that was used for training woodworkers. It is 11 1/2”Long, 1 3/4”Wide and weighs 3 3/4lbs. This plane was made from 1921 until 1983 and this one appears to be a more receint model. It ca...

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Intarsia Basics #2: Preparing Your Wood and Pattern for Cutting

04-11-2012 01:20 AM by KoryK | 18 comments »

Intro: Hello to all and welcome to the first installment of Intarsia Basics. Before we can start cutting we need to select the wood we want to use and get our pattern ready. Wood Choices: I prefer to start with stock that is one inch thick because that gives you a lot of depth that you can work with. It will require a little more sanding on some areas but it will help to give your piece a 3D look. It is your choice if you prefer to stain your wood to achieve the colors or use exot...

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Shop Tools #4: JessEm Mite-R-Excel™ Precision Miter Gauge with Dual-Indexing Angle Location

06-02-2007 02:14 AM by WayneC | 16 comments »

David posted pictures of his new miter gauge and was looking for some pictures of other miter gauges. I commited to show some pictures of my Jessem miter guage. The first step in using my table saw is removing the Peacock. (Deb has named him LJ). The box on top of the table saw is a Biesmeyer Over Arm Saw guard that is waiting to be installed. On to the miter gauge. It is a JessEm Mite-R-Excel. It has a 24" fence and can extend to 36" The gauge has a Dual-Indexing Angle Location ...

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Shop Tips & Tricks #12: Making Long, Round Things in Wood - with the Norwegian Dowel Cutter

04-15-2013 11:10 PM by GnarlyErik | 5 comments »

Sometimes you need long round parts made from wood. Prior to the 19th century, specially made wooden dowels often served where nails, screws and bolts are used today. For instance, in barn building and shipbuilding, ‘trunnels’ were used to fasten timbers together and planks to a ships ribs. Outside of lacking the strength of of metal, trunnels are not affected by electrolysis and do not rust, important considerations in ships – although of course they can eventually rot. The word ‘trunn...

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