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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'thos moser'

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #10: Building Dovetailed Drawers

422 days ago by DustyMark | 2 comments »

Dovetailed DrawersThere are many functional means of building drawers that will stand the test of time. I believe a fine case piece, such as the Dr. White’s Chest, warrants drawers assembled with dovetail joints. Watch this video to see my detailed description of building drawers with half-blind dovetail joints using the Leigh dovetail jig. This photo shows the drawers at the dry assembly stage. The joints are tight enough to handle the drawers prior to glue up. The end grain...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #9: Turning Knobs

446 days ago by DustyMark | 0 comments »

I like to turn the knobs on the cases I build. Dr. White’s chest has a total of twelve knobs. I’m not a skilled turner, but that hasn’t stopped me from building a lot of furniture with turned parts. Turning a batch of knobs that is “identical” could drive a turner to another hobby. However, it’s not too difficult to turn out a batch that matches “close enough.” Remember, this is a handmade project and hand-turned knobs scream craftsmanship. Watch this video to see how I turn out the kno...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #8: Hanging Doors

451 days ago by DustyMark | 0 comments »

Mortising the HingesHanging doors involves a mixture of precise work and some trial and error. The first step is to choose a hinge and then mortise the case frame to receive the hinge. A common approach for hinge placement is to locate the top of the upper hinge even with the bottom of the upper rail and locate the bottom of the lower hinge even with the top of the lower rail of the door frame. I should have thought ahead and routed these mortises before assembling the case. However, I fo...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #7: Raised Panel Doors

452 days ago by DustyMark | 2 comments »

Raised Panel DoorsBuilding a set of raised panel doors might seem like a daunting process. However, it’s simply a sequence of steps that, granted, use most of the tools in a serious hobbyist’s wood shop. Wood movement is an issue here since the panel grain runs perpendicular to the grain of the top and bottom rails of the door frame. Watch this video to see how to build a raised panel door in one 25-minute video. This blog entry also includes links to eight individual videos that highligh...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #6: Trim

453 days ago by DustyMark | 0 comments »

TrimChests and wardrobes benefit greatly from the added visual detail of trim applied at the top of the case. Watch this video to see how I cut the cove for the trim on my Dr. White’s chest. Trim after application and prior to final sanding. Out-of-focus shot of the temporary fence set-up I used to make the cove cut. Be sure that your clamps have a good hold. Often, the areas under or near the edge of the table saw are difficult to attain a good clamp hold. NOTE: Years ago,...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #5: Case Legs

454 days ago by DustyMark | 3 comments »

Case Legs Watch this video to view the leg construction and track my progress on the face frame. I like legs that are cut in two planes on a tall case like Dr. White’s chest. This gives the legs a more fully formed look. I used a wider lower rail with a mortise and tenon joint at the base of the face frame rather than a narrow piece with a dovetail joint. Our vacuum floor attachment will still reach under the face of the case to suck up dust balls! The sides of the original Dr. Whit...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #3: Case Construction and Glue-Up

456 days ago by DustyMark | 4 comments »

Design Considerations Watch this video to explore design considerations. Solid wood case construction must take into account wood movement. Wood expands and contracts across the grain and does not along the length of the grain. When wood is glued across grain over a long span, it will split when it contracts. NOTE: The drawer frames and the back are all pre-assembled. The back is a mortise and tenon frame which contains six floating solid-wood panels. Clamping rehearsal withou...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #2: Multiple Mortise and Tenon Joints

457 days ago by DustyMark | 0 comments »

Multiple Mortise and Tenon Joints I’ve owned a Leigh dovetail jig since the early 90’s. I started with the 12” model that I used for drawer construction. I switched to the 24” model so that I could join the top of a case to the sides with a through dovetail joint. I bought the M2 multiple mortise and tenon attachment for the 24” D3 jig prior to building a book case that was to hold a tremendous amount of books. I wanted more glue surface and strength than a rabbet joint could pro...

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Building a Dr. White's Chest #1: My Interpretation of Thos. Moser's Design

458 days ago by DustyMark | 8 comments »

What to Expect This blog series will highlight some of the techniques I use in solid wood case construction. My previous blog, about building the New Gloucester rocker, covered nearly every step in photographs with an occasional video. This blog will not detail every step along the way, but will rather explore key details of case construction using primarily videos. The videos are “rough takes” since I’m not going to spend the extra time to edit them. In those situati...

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2009 Woodworking In America Conference @ St. Charles, IL

1808 days ago by Andy Brownell | 2 comments »

Well, the recent conference in St. Charles, IL was one heck of an event. The keynote speaker Thos. Moser stopped by the Gorilla Glue booth before the dinner and presentation. What a thrill and inspiration to meet a great American craftsman and business man. He and his wife were truly pleasant people. I’m interested to hear from any other Jocks out there who attended the event. I’ve got more details on the whole event on my other blog here.

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