LumberJocks

Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'tablesaw'

  • Advertise with us
View Jon Parker's profile

"New" Table Saw #1: Getting Started

10-28-2008 06:49 AM by Jon Parker | 2 comments »

Earlier this summer, I acquired an old 10” Craftsman table saw at a garage sell for $35.00! I already have a newer Craftsman 10” table saw. I got the old one with the intent to fix it up and build an all-in-one table saw, router table, sanding table, and storage center. I am finally getting started tonight by breaking it all down and starting to remove some rust. Whoever owned this thing previously sure didn’t take very good care of it. I’ll continue to post and g...

Read this entry »


View teenagewoodworker's profile

Commisions #13: money box #2

10-23-2008 12:58 AM by teenagewoodworker | 4 comments »

So i finally got some work done today on my box. first i started by making the bottom. because i am using thick material for the sides i wanted to add some rigidness to the box so it is a 1/2” thick poplar bottom and i did the bevel with a hand plane. rather than set up machinery or anything. then it was time to focus on the dividers. these are hard because they are very thin stock and to get them good they have to fit right. so what i did was cut them and did almost what resembl...

Read this entry »


View CloneZero's profile

Woodwork Joints

10-16-2008 09:07 PM by CloneZero | 3 comments »

Woodwork Joints : Where wood meets wood to stick! If you need to connect two pieces of wood, this blog is an excellent resource. Lot’s of useful and clear illustrations too. Table of ContentsDOVETAIL GROOVING JOINTS FOR CURVED WORK MISCELLANEOUS JOINTS PUZZLE JOINTS SHUTTING JOINTS THE BRIDLE JOINT THE DOVETAIL JOINT THE DOWELLING JOINT THE GLUED JOINT THE HALVED JOINT THE HINGED JOINT THE MITRED JOINT THE MORTISE AND TENON JOINTTHE SCARF JOINT THE TONGUED AND GROOVED JOINT

Read this entry »


View CloneZero's profile

Woodwork Joints

10-16-2008 08:56 PM by CloneZero | 0 comments »

Woodwork Joints : Where wood meets wood to stick! If you need to connect two pieces of wood, this blog is an excellent resource. Lot’s of useful and clear illustrations too. Table of ContentsDOVETAIL GROOVING JOINTS FOR CURVED WORK MISCELLANEOUS JOINTS PUZZLE JOINTS SHUTTING JOINTS THE BRIDLE JOINT THE DOVETAIL JOINT THE DOWELLING JOINT THE GLUED JOINT THE HALVED JOINT THE HINGED JOINT THE MITRED JOINT THE MORTISE AND TENON JOINTTHE SCARF JOINT THE TONGUED AND GROOVED JOINT

Read this entry »


View mhawkins2's profile

Hard lessons #4: In Search of the Perfect Miter

10-16-2008 04:25 AM by mhawkins2 | 8 comments »

I am beginning to think that a dead on PERFECT miter is about like big foot or the Loch Ness monster. We’ve all heard of it, a few claim to have achieved it, most of us probably don’t believe it. I am an engineer in occupation and by nature, so when I say perfect; I mean PERFECT. Dead on 45 degree not 44.99 nor 45.01. The vertical face of the wood is completely vertical as is the blade so the sides don’t tilt. And the wood is absolutely of consistent thickness so the re...

Read this entry »


View lew's profile

Kitchen Treasures #1 Making the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin #4: Glue Up and Trimming The Blank- The Final Steps

10-06-2008 01:45 AM by lew | 16 comments »

Before starting this section, I forgot to add to pix into the previous post. This is the spacer strip used to reposition the blanks for the second cut. The spacer goes between the blank and the fence. This shows the blank seated against the rear stop and the blank is labeled to assure it is not reversed during the various cutting operations. I found it easier to glue if I oriented the blank with the diagonal cut facing up. I use an old restaurant cutting board as a gluing wor...

Read this entry »


View lew's profile

Kitchen Treasures #1 Making the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin #3: Making the Saw Cuts For the Strips

10-05-2008 10:22 PM by lew | 3 comments »

Once the blank has the layout lines drawn, it is time to cut the slots for the ellipses. The first step is to set the blade height. When the cut is made, there should be about 1/8” of material left holding the two sides together. This really aids in the glue up by keeping the pieces aligned. Set the blank on the jig and adjust the angle and the end stop so that the front SHORTER layout line is positioned to the LEFT side of the blade cut. Orientation is when you are standin...

Read this entry »


View Dan'um Style's profile

Quartersawn oak frames and Sandzen and Scarab stoneware tiles

10-05-2008 07:03 AM by Dan'um Style | 11 comments »

In process photos of oak frames and tiles I’m working on this weekend. 10 5 2008 The texture on the back of the scarab is made with ground glass impregnated into the wet clay and then fired to around 2000 degrees. finished scarab with bronzed finish. ...

Read this entry »


View jim1953's profile

what brand of blade do you use

10-05-2008 04:50 AM by jim1953 | 18 comments »

what brand blade do you use on your table saw Iuse frued blade 24 teeth I bought it to rip oak and it cuts so smooth,I use it all the time

Read this entry »


View lew's profile

Kitchen Treasures #1 Making the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin #2: Laying Out the Blank

10-05-2008 04:24 AM by lew | 4 comments »

This second part will concentrate on the layout of the rolling pin blank in preparation for cutting the slots. Create a blank that is 22” long and 2” square. Locate the center of the length (11”) and carry a line around the blank. The ellipses are 11” long and made of three pieces of 1/8” thick materialLayout a mark 5 ½” on either side of the center line and accurately carry the lines around the blank. To assist in laying out the diagonals, use a 3/8” thick spacer gauge, drawing lines...

Read this entry »


« prev 1 ... 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 ... 213 next »
2124 entries


DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com