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Woodworking blog entries tagged with 'roubo'

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My Roubo Workbench. #5: Part 6 Sliding Deadman

01-03-2016 11:14 AM by joedillon | 3 comments »

When milling up the material for the bench at my firms workshop i created a right angled triangular rail for the deadman to slide across, a couple of opposing 45 rips followed by a 0 rip was enough to create the slide. This was cut to the shoulder length of the front slider, glued and clamped into position.The underside of the top received a 12×20mm groove between the two front mortices created by a router and parallel fence.I cut a birds mouth at the bottom and a tongue at the t...

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part 5 fitting the stretchers.

01-02-2016 08:33 PM by joedillon | 0 comments »

For me the stretchers would make or break the bench, if measured, cut and positioned incorrectly it introduce an instability in the bench and or make it next to unusable.I wanted them as heavy as possible so they ended up being 100*100mm.I clamped all the legs to the bench top and placed the stretchers against the legs and marked each on against its corresponding legs.I used the same mortice gauge to mark the tenons, scribed the shoulders with a knife and went to work cutting the shou...

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My Roubo Workbench. #4: part 4 Leg to benchtop joints.

01-02-2016 03:12 PM by joedillon | 3 comments »

At this point of the build I had a big decision to make, the original Roubo design details a through mortice and Tenon and sliding dovetail. Although I’m a carpenter I haven’t marked out a Tenon let alone a dovetail in over 20 years. My confidence in my joint cutting skills didn’t match my aspirations in keeping to the original design.I chickened out and decided that a single beefy mortice and tenon would do.Using a mortice gauge I acuarately marked the tenons in eac...

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My Roubo Workbench. #3: part 3 flattening and vice tribulations

01-01-2016 11:55 PM by joedillon | 1 comment »

I had taken the opportunity to sand and hopefully relitively flatten the bench top in the workshop, it looked nice but a couple of winding sticks and an 1800mm straight edge proved it was far from flat.My Stanley No5 1/2 was sharpened and I went to work. Thankfully there was little twist and after a few diagonal passes the worst of the bumps where gone. I reset the plane for a much shallower cut and began to plane with the grain until I got full length shavings.I didn’t go mad, I wa...

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My Roubo Workbench. #2: Part 2 Milling up the material.

01-01-2016 04:58 PM by joedillon | 2 comments »

I’m a carpenter, I fit out kitchens, offices, cafes for a specialist joinery firm that runs a modest workshop.By chance they had overordered a batch of Spruce pine and had no immediate use for it.After a brief chat with the boss and workshop manager, 7 of those boards were wheeled to a massive table saw, the legs, stretchers and top were cut to an oversize dimension and length, then surface planed and edged and then thicknessed.My intention was to hand build this bench over the Chri...

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My Roubo Workbench. #1: Concept.

01-01-2016 04:25 PM by joedillon | 0 comments »

I’ve yearned for a few years now to have my own space, my own small shop and build my own bench.I’ve been inspired by YouTube contributers such as Paul Sellers, Billy’s Little Bench to build my own bench, that I didn’t actually need a workshop full of powerful tools to create a sturdy, purposeful and beautiful bench. My initial problem was designing the bench, what goes where, dimensions, what type of joinery to use and how to execute it. I didn’t want ...

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Yet another workbench #5: Hardware 2 and Wrap Up

08-31-2015 09:49 PM by JonasB | 1 comment »

Parallel guide chain mechanism To make the chain mechanism, I used #35 chain and the sprockets are 10T with a 3/8 center. The chain is attached using two chain links. I had to do some metal working to create a few items: the brackets to hold the sprockets and a way of securing the chain at both ends. I had a 1.5” rectangular steel tube in my scrap collection so I used an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel to make both brackets that hold the sprockets with 3/8 bolts. Big box store ang...

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Yet another workbench #4: Hardware 1

08-30-2015 05:41 PM by JonasB | 0 comments »

Screw assembly The face vise screw mechanism is all DIY. Here are the piece parts. The hand-wheel has been kicking around my basement for 15 years. I remember buying it on Ebay for a project I never completed. It was too nice to throw away, so it waited and waited until now to find a purpose. The acme screw and nut I picked up on Ebay more recently. I cut the screw to length and drilled the hole that holds the hand-wheel setscrew. I found a 5 inch brass plate 1/2 inch thick also on...

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Yet another workbench #3: Wooden Parts 2

08-29-2015 05:36 PM by JonasB | 0 comments »

Top Assembly The top consist of two sub-assemblies: The lower half and the upper. The lower half is made up of two plywood sheets glued together, edged with maple and joined using doweled bridle joints. The doubled up plywood is attached to the frame using a basic butt joint strengthened with 3/8” dowels and glued down with epoxy. I used this method because my wood was not wide enough for the desired final dimensions if I rabbeted in the panel. This simple butt joint gave me some a...

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Yet another workbench #2: Wooden Parts 1

08-28-2015 05:35 PM by JonasB | 3 comments »

Leg Assembly Two leg assemblies are part of the support system for the bench. I was going to use glued up 2×4s, but found some 12/4 poplar, so sawed that to shape instead. The legs are 2.75” thick and 4” wide, and the top rail is 2.75” square. The legs are angled at about 15 degrees. The 2×4 approach would have simplified cutting the angled slots, but then you have the hassle of cleaning up the glued up legs. The large hunks of wood making up the legs give them a nice soli...

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